FAMILY OF HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS and CATHARINE HELENA JAY

HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS married CATHARINE HELENA JAY

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Catharine Helena JAY’s Grandfather of course had been very much involved in the Colonies separation from England and the development of our Democracy. JOHN JAY had married Sarah LIVINGSTON, a daughter of the then Governor of New Jersey, William LIVINGSTON He was one of the early patriots and revolutionary founders of this country. During the Revolution he had been sent to Spain to try and negotiate support from the wealthy Spanish crown, then had gone to Paris to negotiate with Benjamin Franklin and Henry Laurens the peace treaty with the English, had return, been made Chief Justice of the new court by George Washington and then negotiated another unpopular treaty with England, and ended as Governor of New York and worked to pass the ratification of the new Constitution while Governor.

Their oldest son, Peter Augustus Jay, who married Mary Rutherfurd Clarkson, became a successful lawyer in New York City. They had eight children, four daughters of whom Catharine was the third. Peter Augustus Jay (January 24, 1776 – February 22, 1843) was the eldest son of New York’s only native Founding Father, John Jay. Peter was one of 6 children born to John Jay and Sarah Livingston Jay, and one of 2 boys (brother William was born in 1789) with 4 sisters: Susan (born and died in 1780); Maria (b. 1782), Ann (b. 1783) and Sarah Louisa (b. 1792)

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Peter Augustus Jay was born at “Liberty Hall,” in 1776, at the home of his grandparents’, the Livingstons, in Elizabethtown, New Jersey. Like his father, he graduated from King’s College, the precursor of Columbia University. Notably following his graduation in 1794, Peter Augustus acted as private secretary to his father in London for the Jay Treaty.[1] The young Jay studied law and established a practice in New York City with his cousin Peter Jay Munro, carrying on a family tradition of public service. He married Mary Rutherfurd Clarkson, daughter of General Matthew Clarkson, in 1807 [2 ][3 ] and they had 8 children. From 1812 – 1817, Peter Augustus Jay helped found the Bank for Savings (thereby contributing to the establishment of the New York State savings bank system). As a Federalist, he was a member from New York City of the New York State Assembly in 1816, during which time he was active in arranging the financing for the construction of the Erie Canal. He ran many times for Congress, but was always defeated by the Democratic-Republican candidates. From 1819 to 1821, he was Recorder of New York City. He was a delegate from Westchester Co. to the New York State Constitutional Convention of 1821. He helped found the New York Law Institute in 1828, which today is the oldest law library in New York City. Jay was President of New York Hospital (1827-1833), Chairman of the Board of Trustees, King’s College and President of the New York Historical Society (1840-1842). [4] For a time he was also a Westchester County Judge.[5]

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The Rye House: Under his father’s aegis, Peter Augustus installed European styled stone ha-has on the property and planted elm trees. His father John Jay died in 1829. In 1836, Peter Augustus contracted with a builder, Edwin Bishop, to take down the failing farmhouse that had been barraged by the British during the Revolutionary War. Reusing structural elements from “The Locusts” where his father grew up as a boy, Peter Augustus Jay helped create the Greek Revivalmansion that stands there today. Unfortunately his wife Mary would not live to see the house completed, as she died in Madeira on December 24, 1838. Peter Augustus Jay died in 1843 and the Rye house passed to his son, John Clarkson Jay.[8

Mary Rutherford CLARKSON’s father, Matthew Clarkson (October 17, 1758 – April 25, 1825) was an American Revolutionary War soldier and a politician in New York State. The town of Clarkson in Western New York was named after him. He was a great uncle of Thomas S. Clarkson, a member of the family who founded Clarkson University. Matthew Clarkson was born October 17, 1758 in New York to David and Elizabeth Clarkson. He was the great-great-grandson of Reverend David Clarkson (1622–1686), a notable Puritan clergyman in Yorkshire, England, whose sermons included “The Doctrine of Justification is Dangerously Corrupted by the Roman Church.” His great-grandfather was Matthew Clarkson who came to New York from England in 1690 as Secretary of the Province. He married Mary Rutherford on May 24, 1785, and Sarah Cornell on February 14, 1792. Clarkson died April 25, 1825.

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He served in the Revolutionary War, first on Long Island, subsequently under Benedict Arnold. He was at Saratoga and, later, on the staff of General Benjamin Lincoln, was present at the surrender of Burgoyne at Savannah (1779) and at the defense of Charleston (1780). He was also present at the surrender of Cornwallis. After the war, Clarkson was commissioned brigadier general of militia of Kings and Queens Counties in June 1786 and Major General of the Southern District of New York in March 1798. [edit]Political service When the war ended, Lincoln became Secretary of War and Clarkson became his assistant. He served as a member of the New York State Assembly for one term (1789–1790) and introduced a bill for the gradual abolition of slavery in the State. As a Regent of the University of the State of New York he was presented at the court of French King Louis XVI. He served as U.S. Marshal (1791–1792), State Senator 1794-1795, a member of the commission to build a new prison 1796-1797 and President of the New York (City) Hospital (1799). In 1802, Clarkson was the Federalist candidate for U.S. Senator from New York but was defeated by DeWitt Clinton. He was President of the Bank of New York from 1804 until his death in 1825. [edit]Town of Clarkson On April 2, 1819, the town of Clarkson was established by the New York State Legislature and named in honor of General Clarkson. Although there is no evidence that he ever lived in Western New York, he reportedly owned a sizable amount of land there, and he gave 100 acres (405,000 m²) to the town.

Children of Henry Augustus Du BOIS and Catharine Helena JAY
1. Col. Cornelius Jay DuBois, M.D., b. N. Y. City, Aug. 31, 1836; d. New Haven, Conn., Feb. 11, 1880
2. Peter A. Jay DuBois, b. Madiera, Spain Feb. 23, 1839; d. June 3, 1839. 3430.
3. Major Henry A. DuBois, Jr., M.D., b NY City. June 26, 1840; m. Emily M. Blois. He was Surgeon in regular army, and served in Civil War. They had 4 children.
4. John Jay Dubois, b.Newton Falls, June 6, 1846; d. Nov. 11, 1898. 3432.
5. Augustus Jay DuBois, b. Newton Falls Apr. 22, 1849; m. Adeline Blakeslee.
6. Alfred Wagstaff Dubois, b. Newton Falls Dec. 30, 1852. d. 17 May 1900 m Anna M Lictenberg
7. Mary Rutherford Dubois, b.NY City May 22, 1854. d Nov 6, 1919
8. Robert Ogden Dubois, b New Haven CT Jan. 19, 1860; d. Mar. 9, 1895; m. ■, Alice Mason. They had three children

CORNELIUS JAY Du BOIS

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Col. Cornelius Jay DuBois, M.D., b. N. Y. City, Aug. 31, 1836; d. New Haven, Conn., Feb. 11, 1880. Grad. Columbia Law School in 1861; on outbreak of Civil War went to Washington with 7th Reg1t; recruited Co. D. 27th Conn. Vols, at New Haven and was made Capt.; served under Gen. Hancock in Zooks1s Brigade at Aquia Creek, Falmouth, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville; was severely wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; rescued by brother, Dr. Henry A. DuBois3430, Ass1t Surgeon reg. army, but never fully recovered from wound; Gen. Hancock testified to his father there was never a more gallant charge, and Col. Brook said there never was a more gallant soldier in the army than Capt. DuBois. After partial recovery he became Adjutant of 20th Conn. Vols., and served under Hooker and Sherman in Georgia; in battle of Resaca, he seized colors from wounded bearer and planted them on summit of enemy1s position; brevetted Major by Pres. U. S. for bravery at Gettysburg, and Lieut. Col. for gallantry at Resaca; July, 1866, received degree of M.D. at Yale Medical College, and went abroad for health; on return spent balance of life at New Haven, bearing his sufferings with the same courage displayed in military action.

HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS married EMILY M BLOIS

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Their second son, Henry after the CivilWar, served with Indian Service in New Mexico. He moved to Mann County in California about 1868. Two of his brothers lived with him for a time. He was married to Emily Blois in 1880. They had four children .

BioYale: . Henry Augustus DuBois, M.D., b. at the residence of his g. f. DuBois, n. w. cor. Broadway and 8th street, June 26, 1840 ; Yale B.P., 1859; April 25, 1861, he joined the 12th Regiment of N.Y.S.N.G. as Hospital Steward, in a few weeks was examined for Asst. Surgeon, U.S.A., and passed No. 3 out of 40 applicants; Aug. 28, 186 1, was under Dr. Abadie in the Columbian Hospital, Washington, but was soon put in full charge. He served in the 6th U. S. Cavalry as Inspector of Cavalry ; May, 1862, Asst, Med. Director of the Army of the Potomac, subsequently Medical In-spector of the Artillery Reserve under Gen. Hunt ; was at the H of Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, etc., in all about 40 battles ; 1864, Inspector of Hospitals at headquarters of the Army of the Potomac ; in June, 1864, on Gen. Sheridan’s staff; Aug., 1864, appointed Asst. Med. Director of the Middle MilitaryDivision of Va., on Sheridan’s staff, and was with him in all his battles, and present at Lee’s surrender ; brevetted by the President Captain, and subsequently Brevet Major. In 1865, took charge of the U. S. Laboratory in Phil. ; May, 1866, sent to Fort Union, New Mexico ; resigned Feb. 21, 1868, and is now practising medicine in San Rafael, Cal., where he has founded a cemetery (Temaulpas), of which he is Comptroller ; delivered in Yale Medical Coll., April, i860, a course of lectures on Toxicology. Confirmed by Bishop Williams, in St. Paul’s, New Haven; m. in 5th Avenue Church, by Rev. John Hall, D.D., Dec. i, 1880, Emily, dau. of Hannah MariaFerris (dau. of Miss Schieffelin, who was dau. of Hannah Lawrence and Schieffelin), and Samuel Blois, M.D. i child.

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The following article was written by Marilyn L Geary and published in the SanRafael paper. “DR Henry Augustus DuBois, Jr. settled in San Rafael in 1869 after serving as a surgeon in the Civil War and in the Indian Wars of New Mexico. Born to a wealthy East Coast family, Yale-educated Dr. DuBois was a great-grandson of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a president of the Continental Congress. In his memoirs, William Kent described DuBois as “a New Englander and a straight-laced and proper citizen. He was educated, skillful and much esteemed.” Chickahominy Fever Dr. DuBois may have been lured to San Rafael by its healthy climate. In the California Medical Society’s journal, Dr. DuBois recommended San Rafael as ideal for a “sanitarium for chronic diseases.” During the Civil War, DuBois had contracted Chickahominy fever, a camp fever with symptoms of typhoid and malaria named for the mosquito-ridden swamps of the Chickahominy River in Virginia. The 1870 Census shows Dr. DuBois residing with 40-year-old Dr. Alfred Taliaferro, the first physician to practice in Marin. They lived in San Rafael Village with a 23-year old Chinese servant named Ah Poy. Dr. DuBois subsequently purchased land west of San Rafael at the end of today’s Fifth Street in what was called Forbes Valley. His land was far removed from town and included a section of Red Hill. Burials Prohibited When Dr. DuBois arrived in San Rafael, the town was growing fast, and the cemetery at St. Paul’s Episcopal Churchyard, Fourth and E Streets, could not keep up. In 1876, two years after San Rafael incorporated, town trustee Dr. Taliaferro proposed and got passed an ordinance prohibiting burials within San Rafael’s town limits. On Sept. 14, 1876, theMarin County Journal reported on a town meeting held to determine where to locate a new cemetery: “Nearly all the money and land kings were present.” Among several bids, Dr. DuBois offered a portion of his ranch for $13,000. The town trustees took no action, and the law to prohibit burials in town limits was rescinded. It was deemed “better to double up in the old yard than keep the dead above ground.” A Committee of One Not one to dawdle, by June 1878 Dr. DuBois had 40 men working on 113 acres of his land to build the new cemetery. He later stated, “I organized myself a committee of one.” He put enormous funds and energies into the venture, planting myrtle and ivy by the wagonload, laying out miles of roadways, setting out 2,000 trees and thousands of flowers. In September the Marin Journal reported that Dr. DuBois was doing a great amount of work. Schooners came up San Rafael Creek to First and C streets with loads of urns, fountains, sample monuments, granite walls and fences. DuBois had drawn up plans for a bell tower and an artesian well 2,000 feet deep. In December 1879 the Marin Journal reported that Dr. DuBois had toured 42 cemeteries in the East to collect drawings, photos, maps, statistics on water supply and other cemetery best practices. DuBois’ Folly In the late 1800s cemeteries were designed as parks for picnics and Sunday outings. DuBois expected that the cemetery would be a favorite destination and built miles of access roads. As he owned a portion of Red Hill, he hired Chinese laborers to build a zig-zag road up its heights to provide access from San Anselmo. Too steep for horse and buggy, the project gained the label “.” The Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery was dedicated in August 1879. It eventually served some of San Rafael’s most prominent families, including the Dollars and the Boyds. DuBois’ horizons, however, stretched beyond Marin. In January 1880 Dr. DuBois wrote in the Marin County Journal: “It is believed that, with the example of New York City, many burials from San Francisco will take place here…Objections [are] that San Francisco funerals must come on the boat and pass through town, but the midday, little-used boat will be used and funerals can pass on streets with few houses. Friends prophesy I will be ruined…I have been ruined so frequently – at least my friends have so prophesied – that I don’t mind it a bit.” Dr. DuBois built a number of artificial lakes at the cemetery. In 1881, reporting that the carp had multiplied from 11 to over 750, he suggested, “Carp raising would be a good industry here.”San Rafael in Denver? In 1874 Dr. DuBois platted a development in Denver, Colorado, which he named San Rafael for his California home. He expanded this subdivision in 1882 and 1886 as demand increased for more lots.The area, located 8 blocks northeast of downtown Denver, is now a heritage district on the National Register of Historic Places. An early advertisement described it as “beautifully located overlooking the city with a glorious view of the mountains.” Despite his activities in Denver, DuBois remained in San Rafael, Calif., where two of his siblings joined him. In 1880 he lived with his brother Alfred W. DuBois, a 28-year old Chinese servant Ah Jim and a 44-year-old servant Amelia Schuthris. Later that year, Dr. DuBois married Emily M. Blois, and they subsequently had four children. The Vaccine Farm : Building a cemetery, a residential neighborhood in a distant city, and a new family is more than enough to manage, but Dr. DuBois saw problems as opportunities. In the 1880s, vaccine panics often accompanied smallpox epidemics. Summer heat precluded transporting fresh vaccine from the East, and vaccine became scarce. The Pacific Coast Vaccine Farm didn’t last. Dr. DuBois died May 27, 1897 at age 55 of the typhoid fever he contracted in the Virginia swamps. Du Bois Street in San Rafael is named for another DuBois, but Dr. Henry A. DuBois Jr.’s legacy lives on in Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery and in Denver’s historic San Rafael district.”

JOHN JAY Du BOIS

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John Jay Du BOIS was a lawyer and lived part of his life in San Rafael, California with his brother Henry. He was unmarried

AUGUSTUS JAY Du BOIS married Adeline BLAKESLEE

Augustus Jay Du BOIS married Adeline Blakeslee and lived in New Haven. He was the Professor of Civil Engineering at the Sheffield School of Engineering, part of Yale University. They had no children.

ALFRED WAGSTAFF DuBOIS married ANNA LICHTENBERG

Alfred Wagstaff Du BOIS married Anna Lichtenberg. He lived for a period with his brother Henry in California. He died in Paris of a “hemorrhage” at age 47.  Aunt ANNA continued to live in San Francisco.

MARY RUTHERFURD Du BOIS

Mary Rutherfurd Du BOIS was unmarried and lived and died in New Haven.

ROBERT OGDEN Du Bois married ALICE MASON

The youngest child, Robert Ogden Du BOIS was born in new Haven in 1860 the time of the Civil War. He went to Yale and then Yale Medical School. He then moved to New York City and opened a medical practice specializing in ENT problems. In 1889 he married Alice Mason, the daughter of Rev Arthur Mason and from the family of Jonathan Mason from Boston. They had three children, Arthur, Helen and Robert. Unfortunately he had Rhumatic Fever as a child, developed heart disease and died of congestive heart failure when he was 36. His wife Alice died soon after. Their three children were brought up by their Mason Uncle, called Boompa!

Her father, Arthur Mason was born in Boston in 1837. He graduated from Trinity College. He studied in Geneva and returned to enter Berkley Divinity School in Middleton, Ct. He married Amelia Caroline Taylor, He was Rector of a number of churches in Mass, New Haven and New York City. He died at his home in New York City in 1907 and was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery.

Her mother, Amelia Caroline Taylor was born in Cuba. Her father was a successful sugar Merchant there. He lived in Cuba until 1848 when they returned to Baltimore, Md. His father had also been active in sugar trade with Cuba and had been active in Baltimore political life. He was involved in the War of 1812. He also was one of the managers of a statue erected to honor George Washington in Baltimore

The couple had four children, a son and four daughters. Alexander T Mason, the oldest, became active in NY Politics and was the Republican Leader of the 29th Assembly District. The oldest daughter, Isabella married Mansel Van Rensselaer and they had four children, Bernard, Arthur, Maud and Alexander. The next oldest daughter, Alice married Robert Ogden Du Bois and they had three children, Arthur, Helen and Robert, The youngest daughters, ”Maud and Teddy” never married

Her grandfather, Jonathan Mason, Jr., of Boston, was a portrait and figure painter, student of Gilbert Stuart, friend or acquaintance of virtually every major American artist of the nineteenth century. His father Jonathan died in 1831. He himself was married to Isabella Weyman in Italy in 1834. The sculptor Horatio Greenough was one of the witnesses. They had six children: sons Charles, Arthur, Herbert, and Philip, and two daughters, Isabelle (who married Charles Hook Appleton) and another who married William Sturgis Hooper. Arthur became an ordained minister. Herbert and Philip served in the Union army during the Civil War; Philip died from wounds in July 1864 and was interred atMount Auburn Cemetery.

Her Great Grandfather was Senator Jonathen Mason who was born in Boston and graduated from Boston Latin School and Princeton University. He studied law and was admitted to the Mass bar in 1779. He served in the Mass House of Representatives and in the Senate from 1786 to 1800. In 1800 he was elected to the United States Senate where he served from 1800 to 1803. He then returned to the Mass Senate and returned to Washington as a member of the House from 1817 to 1820. He married Susannah Powell whose family had immigrated from Wales and were early settlers of Vermont. Senator Mason was a friend of Gilbert Stuart and urged him to move to Boston. Portraits of them done by Stuart hung in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston

The oldest son, my father, Arthur Mason Du BOIS, Birth Nov 4, 1890 in New York Death Dec 1979 in New York married my mother, MARIE LOUISE DIXON+*Birth 15 Dec 1895 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, Death 03 JUL 1943 in Hewlett, Nassau, New York, They had two children. Both are buried in the Jay Cemetery. Married Cornelia Prime COSTER Birth 6 Feb 1901 in New York, New York, Death 11 Dec 1956 in New York,

M. LOUISE Dixon Du BOIS was active in the formation of the New York Junior League. She had an active interest in history and documented the genealogy of my ancestors. This is kept at the Jay Homestead in Rye and as part of their exhibition.

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