JAY FAMILY PORTRAITS BY DANIEL HUNTINGTON

DANIEL HUNTINGTON
(Wiki) Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 – April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York City, New York, the son of Benjamin Huntington, Jr. and Faith Trumbull Huntington; his paternal grandfather was Benjamin Huntington, delegate at the Second Continental Congress and first U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

He studied at Yale with Samuel F.B. Morse, and later with Henry Inman (painter). From 1833 to 1835 he transferred to Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he met Charles Loring Elliott, who encouraged him to become an artist. He first exhibited his work at the National Academy of Design in 1836. Subsequently he painted some landscapes in the tradition of the Hudson River School. Huntington made several trips to Europe, the first in 1839 traveling to England, Rome, Florence and Paris with his friend and pupil Henry Peters Gray. On his return to America in 1840, he painted his allegorical painting “Mercy’s Dream”, which brought him fame and confirmed his interest in inspirational subjects. He also painted portraits and began the illustration of The Pilgrim’s Progress. In 1844, he went back to Rome. Returning to New York around 1846, he devoted his time chiefly to portrait-painting, although he painted many genre, religious and historical subjects.[1] From 1851 to 1859 he was in England. He was president of the National Academy of Design from 1862 to 1870, and again in 1877-1890.[1] He was also vice president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[2]

The REPUBLICAN COURT: Reception of Mrs Washington

Lady Washington’s Reception – large 1867 engraving after Daniel Huntington painting

(Jay Heritage Center Collection)  The line and stipple engraving above is one of several recent gifts made to the Jay Heritage Center this month. The antique print was produced by A.H. Ritchie in 1867 and based on the original 1861 painting by Daniel Huntington titled “The Republican Court.” Huntington’s painting, was completed at the beginning of the Civil War; the scene harkened back to what was seen in hindsight as a more harmonious time between the states — the founding of our union –and it represented an idealized assembly of the leaders of that period (Northern and Southern) in a European, court like setting. The image prominently features John Jay, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton on the left, Martha Washington on the dais, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington center ground and Sarah Livingston Jay on the far right and many other familiar personages of the Revolutionary War.

Daniel Huntington (1816 – 1906) won acclaim and prominence as the favored portraitist of New York Society after the Civil War. Though he was equally skilled at genre works and Hudson River style landscapes, he is best known for his likenesses of presidents, statesmen and other distinguished Americans including his painting of Abraham Lincoln that hangs at the Union League Club in Manhattan where the Jays were also members. Huntington’s training included studying with Jay family colleagues like John Trumbull (who is pictured in the engraving above), and Samuel F. B. Morse, then president of the National Academy of Design, whose successful career as an artist preceded his renown as an inventor. Huntington’s leadership roles in the artistic community were many: he was a member of the National Academy of Design for most of his life and served as its president for 22 years (1862 – 1870; 1877 – 1891). He was a founder and president of the Century Association and as vice-president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art for 33 years, he helped that institution expand and grow in stature. Differentiating it from the painting, the popular steel engraving was retitled “Lady Washington’s Reception” and a key identifying each of the 64 individuals shown was printed in magazines and newspapers of the time.

The original oil painting is at the Brooklyn Museum of. Art:www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/objects/487   Jay Heritage Center 210 Boston Post Road. Rye, NY 10580.  (914) 698-9275 Email: jayheritagecenter@gmail.com

Daniel Huntington turned to portraiture painting late in his career and painted the portraits of many individuals. Part of this was portraits of relatives of John Jay painted between 1860 and 1880. This included portraits of John Clarkson Jay, Laura Prime Jay, with child, (Mrs John Clarkson Jay), Dr Henry Augustus Du Bois, Constance Fielder Bruen, (Mrs Alexander  Bruen ), Eleanore Kingsland Field Jay (Mrs John Jay, II), Alice Jay, Frederick Prime, and William Jay. It also includes one miniature, probably painted after Sarah Livingston Jay death based on an existing miniature

SARAH LIVINGSTON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington(1816-1906)  



SARAH LIVINGSTON JAY (jj4/1)

Sarah Livingston Jay, was a charming, warm, intelligent woman, who loved to entertain and give parties. She provided a needed balance to John Jay, who was serious and ponderous. When John Jay was sent to Spain during the Revolution, they sailed with the French Ambassador who was a very difficult person. A storm crippled the vessel and they floated in the Atlantic awaiting rescue. Mrs. Jay learned that it was the Ambassador’s birthday and opened her baggage trunks to break out a Gala for him! While in Paris she became good friends with the Marquise de Lafayette and because of similarity of looks was often mistaken for her. The Paris Opera audience once rose to its feet thinking on her entrance that Mrs. Jay was Queen. Before she left Paris the Marquise gave her clothing that she wore when she entertained on her return to New York. This apparently upset many of the ladies of New York, who could not compete with her finery. Her “salon” became a place to be seen, and her guests included the Beekmans, the Clarksons, the Stirlings, the de Peysters, the Van Cortlands, the Rutherfords, the Van Rensselaers, and the Ralph Izards. She died at age 45, on May 28,1802, just before the completion of their retirement home in Katonah. The list of arrangements for her funeral included as guests, in addition to the family, almost every important family name in New York. She was buried in the Family Vault in the Bowerie and her remains later removed to the Jay Cemetery plot

 MARY RUTHERFURD CLARKSON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington


Mary Clarkson was the only child of General Matthew Clarkson and Mary RUTHERFURD. She married Peter Augustus Jay, the oldest son of John Jay and Sarah Livingston. They had seven children almost all or their spouses were also painted by Daniel Huntington!  

1870

Frick Digital Archive Collection

Artist: Daniel Huntington Medium: Pastel Comment: Photograph of original oil on canvas in the John Jay Collection, La Jolla, San Diego, Califonia, USA

  JOHN CLARKSON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington (1816-1906)

Sitter: Dr. John Clarkson Jay.  DATE:1872 painting (visual work) canvas.  oil (paint).  H: 30 in, W: 25



He was the son of Peter A. Jay and grandson of Founding Father John Jay, diplomat, first Chief Justice of the United States and two time Governor of New York State. J. C. Jay graduated from his father and grandfather’s alma mater Columbia in 1827, and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1831. In addition to his practice of medicine, he made a specialty of conchology, and acquired the most complete and valuable collection of shells in the United States.[1] This and his costly library on this branch of science were purchased by Catherine Wolfe and presented, in memory of her father, to the American Museum of Natural History, where it is known as the Jay Collection.

LAURA PRIME JAY with Child (wife of John Clarkson Jay)

ARTIST: Daniel Huntington, 14 Oct 1816 – 18 Apr 1906

SITTER: Laura Prime Jay, 1812 -1888 Oil on canvas. 76.8cm x 63.5cm (30 1/4″ x 25″), Accurate
DATE: 1900: Current Owner: Museum of the City of New York

He married Laura Prime (1812-1888) and they had seven children that lived to adulthood. Laura Prime’s father was Nathaniel Prime, a prominent NY banker and one of the wealthiest men in the colony. Her brother Frederick Prime married Mary Rutherfurd Jay, John Clarkson Jay’s sister.
After the death of his father in 1848, when he was 35 years of age, he moved from his home in New York City on Bond Street to the house in Rye, that his father had rebuilt and lived there with his wife Laura for the rest of his life.


ALICE JAY daughter of John Clarkson Jay

Artist: Daniel Huntington,  1816-1906

Sitter: Alice Jay. Date about 1900. Oil on canvas. Given to the Jay Heritage Center in 2012.

                   Written by Suzanne Clary  

The Jay Heritage Center (JHC) recently received an extraordinary gift from one of John Jay’s descendants. In celebration of the continued restoration of the 1838 Jay House in Rye, Ada Hastings of Great Barrington, Massachusetts and her family magnanimously donated a portrait of John Jay’s great granddaughter that once hung in the mansion’s Drawing Room. The painting will be unveiled to the public for the first time on May 15, 2011.
The luminescent painting of a young Alice Jay by pre-eminent artist Daniel Huntington is documented in sepia toned family photos from 1886; it is visible hanging in a prominent location next to two other famous artworks originally owned by the Jays of Rye: Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of John Jay (which today is on view at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.) and Asher Durand’s depiction of Peter Augustus Jay (which belongs to New York Hospital where Peter Augustus Jay served as President of the Board.)

The young subject of the painting, Alice Jay, along with her parents and siblings, lived both in New York and at the Rye estate during the mid and late 19th century. Windows into Alice’s life and times, particularly during the Civil War, are well documented in family letters and diaries. Alice’s father, Dr. John Clarkson Jay, was John Jay’s grandson and a vocal opponent of slavery like his grandfather and father before him. Through the local Episcopal church where he served on the vestry, he was instrumental in spearheading efforts in Rye to recruit volunteers for the Union efforts during the Civil War, a campaign which drew enlistments from Alice’s two older brothers, Peter, who became Captain of a local militia, and John, who served as an assistant surgeon. Alice’s sister kept a diary in which she wrote proudly in 1862, “Rye is called the banner town of the county for she has raised more men by volunteering than any of the other towns.”

    

Dr  HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS, husband of CATHARINE HELENA JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington 1816-1909

Subject: Henry Augustus Du Bois, oil on canvass. Owned by John Jay Du Bois

 

Henry Augustus was the fourth child of Cornelius and Sarah Ogden Du Bois. He was educated in Paris and then went to College of Physicians and Surgeons for his M.D. He returned to France to study medicine and then returned to New York in 1834, a year before he was married to Catharine Helena Jay, the grand daughter of John Jay. He practiced in New York until 1840, and because of poor health retired. His father inherited land between the banks of the Mahoning River in Ohio and they were involved with the settlement of a new community, Newton Falls. During this time he was president of the Virginia Channel Coal Co. They moved back to New Haven in 1854, where he lived until he died at age 76. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery.

ANNA MARIA JAY married Henry Evelyn PIERREPONT

Artist:   Daniel Huntington  1816-1906

Sitter:  Anna Maria Jay PIERREPONT, oil on canvas, given to the Jay Heritage Center June 2015

  
ANNA MARIA JAY** Birth 12 Sep 1819 in New York City, New York, Death 2 Jan 1902 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, married HENRY EVELYN PIERPONT Birth 8 Aug 1808 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, Death 28 Mar 1888 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, They had six children.


Henry Evelyn Pierrepont:The second son of Hezekiah Beers and Anna Maria Constable Pierrepont, Henry Evelyn was born in Brooklyn on August 8, 1808. Henry Evelyn was educated in New York City and quickly acquired his father’s prominence among Brooklyn’s elite. Upon the death of H.B. Pierpont, William Constable, the eldest Pierrepont son, took over the family’s upstate properties while Henry Evelyn remained in Brooklyn, maintaining the family’s influence on, and commitment to, the city’s development. On December 1, 1841, Henry Evelyn married Anna Maria Jay, daughter of Peter Augustus Jay and Mary Rutherford Clarkson, and granddaughter of John Jay, governor of New York (1795-1801) and the first Chief Justice of the United States. Together the couple had six children, including Henry Evelyn Pierrepont II and John Jay Pierrepont.

ELLEN ALMIRA LOW married HENRY EVELYN PIERRPONT, II

ARTIST Daniel Huntington, American, 1816-1906 MEDIUM Oil on canvas  DATES 1847 DIMENSIONS 64 x 53 15/16 in. (162.5 x 137 cm) (show scale) INSCRIPTIONS Inscribed verso: “Ellen Almira Low 24 yrs. 3 mos./ Hariette Low 4 yrs. 8 mos./ Ellen Almira Low 1 yr./ D. Huntington. Pinxt./ N.Y. June 30, 1847.”

CREDIT LINE Gift of Mrs. William Raymond

  

CAPTION Daniel Huntington (American, 1816-1906). Ellen Almira Low and Her Three Children, 1847. Oil on canvas, 64 x 53 15/16 in. (162.5 x 137 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. William Raymond 

 FREDERICK PRIME married Mary Rutherford JAY

Artist:  Daniel Huntington  1816-1906

Sitter: Frederick Prime  oil on canvas. At the Jay Homestead in Bedford, NY

Frederick I. Prime, a Son of Nathaniel Prime and Owner of Edgewood Frederick I. Prime attended Yale, studied law and was admitted to the bar of the State of New York as a young man. He married his first wife, Mary Rutherfurd Jay, and entered practice with her father, his new father-in-law, Peter A. Jay who served as Recorder of New York City. Frederick and Mary Prime had three children before Mary died on September 9, 1835. (She is buried in the Jay Graveyard in Rye, New York.) Their children were Mary Rutherford Prime, born in New York on August 24, 1830; Harriet Prime, born in New York on September 11, 1832; and Helen Jay Prime, born in New York on August 22, 1835. Frederick Prime’s wife, Mary Prime, died only eighteen days after the couple’s third child was born.

 

MRS JOHN JAY, II (Eleanor Field) married JOHN JAY, II

Artist:  Daniel Huntington, 1816-1906

Sitter: Mrs John Jay, II wife of JJ II, oil on canvas,  hangs at the Jay Homestead in Bedford.

  

Eleanor Kingsland Field was the daughter of Hickson Field, of New York. She married John Jay II in 1837. The miniature she wears on the bracelet on her left arm is said to be that of her son, William Jay (1841-1915).
bio: John Jay II was a man of several occupations including diplomat, abolitionist, farmer, lawyer and public service. He was a member of the Jay family, one of the most prominent in New York State and American history. John was very devoted to many causes along with having a strong moral compass, great integrity and a gentle persona. He was born in 1817. John was the third of eight children born to William and August McVickar Jay and a grandson of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. He was raised with five sisters while another brother and sister died very young and enjoyed a childhood of privilege and happiness. As his father and grandfather before him, John also received a classical education in the highest tradition. When John was fifteen, he began studies at Columbia College in New York City and ranked second in the class of 1836. He began legal studies in New York City after graduation and entered the bar in 1839. John practiced law for the next nineteen years until his father’s death in 1858. After retiring from his law practice, he pursued his favorite causes and ran the family businesses. John provided a life of comfort and ease for his family. He married Eleanor Kingsland Field, a strong willed woman, in June 1837 at the Jay home in Bedford, New York. They enjoyed 57 years of marriagealong with a “Jaybilee,” a celebration of their fiftieth wedding anniversary.

CONSTANCE FIELDER BRUEN

Artist: Daniel Huntington.  1816-1906

Sitter: Mrs Alexander Jay BRUEN,  oil on canvas.


The testatrix gives her family sliver and portraits to her children which includes a portrait of herself bv Huntington, the_ Jay„ silver, aqd “the”port rait of her father and mother. WHHam Jay and Augusta J

Yale obit: Yale obit

jsdubois28added this on 20 Jul 2013 

Alexander Jay Bruen, B.A. 1878. Born August 10,1855, in Newport, R.I. Died February 25, 1937, in New York City. Father, Alexander McWhorter Bruen (B.A. Rutgers 1836; M.D. Columbia 1836); son of Mathias and Hannah (Coe) Bruen. Mother, Louisa (Jay) Bruen; daughter of William Jay (B.A. 1807) and Hannah Augusta (McVickar) Jay. Yale relatives include: Peter A. Jay, hon- orary M.A. 1798 /(fflgtt«ncle); W. Livingston Bruen, ’79 (brother); Attended scho||WHH|^Hwk City, Paris and Nice, France, and Dresden, Germarrj^jpS^wHoquy appointment Senior year; mem- ber Dunham Boat Club, Gamma Nu, and Linonia.« Attended Columbia Law School («r-i88o); practiced law independ- ently m New York City until retirement in 1927; author: Our Charities and Bow ‘They are Managed; member St. James Presbyterian Church, New York City. Married June 19, 1907, in Little Silver, N.J., Constance Louise; daughter of Edward Charles and Eliza Winthrop (Carville) Fiedler. Children: Alexander Jay, Jr., ’32; Edward Fiedler Livingston; Con- stance Louisa Jay Fiedler; and Evelyn Louisa. Mrs. Bruen died Novem- ber 25> l93S- Death due to pneumonia. Buried in Jay Cemetery, Rye, N.Y. Sur- vived by children.

WILLIAM JAY

nArtist: Daniel Huntington (1816 – 1906), Comment: Original painting in the collection of John Jay Homestead, Katonah, Westchester, New York, USA

  
He was born in New York City, and graduated from Yale in 1808. After his graduation, he took up the management of his father’s large estate in Westchester County, New York, and also studied law at Albany. Poor eyesight soon compelled him to give up the legal profession. He early became interested in various philanthropic enterprises and reforms and identified himself especially with the temperance, antislavery, and antiwar movements. He was one of the founders (in 1816) of the American Bible Society, which he defended against the vigorous attacks of the High Church party, led by Bishop Hobart. He was judge of common pleas in New York from 1818 to 1820, and was first judge of Westchester County from 1820 to 1842, when he was removed on account of his antislavery views.

2 thoughts on “JAY FAMILY PORTRAITS BY DANIEL HUNTINGTON

  1. Caroline S. DuBois

    Thank you so much for tracking down all the family history – says Caroline S. DuBois, formerly of Oyster Bay now of Port Washington, NY – President, New York Marble Cemetery where our mutual ancestor Cornelius DuBois is buried.

    Like

    Reply

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