Author Archives: jsdubois28

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Jay, Du Bois, Van Wyck history and related stories

Descendants of William Jay: John Jay II 

Chapman, Chandler, Astor connection

William Jay, the youngest son of John Jay had five daughters and one son, John Jay II. John married Eleanore Kingsland Fields. Their oldest child was Eleanore who married Henry Chapman. It is this family that we trace.

Sixth Generation: Eleanore Kingsland Jay married Henry Grafton Chapman  
Eleanor Kingsland JAY was born on May 16, 1839, in New York. She married Henry Grafton CHAPMAN in 1858 in New York. She had four children by the time she was 25. Her husband Henry Grafton passed away on March 14, 1883, in Manila, Philippines, at the age of 48. They had been married 25 years. She died on June 8, 1921, in New York, New York, at the age of 82, and was buried in Bedford, New York.

                  
Seventh Generation: Children of Eleanore Kingsland Jay and Henry Grafton Chapman

A. Henry Grafton Chapman, Jr (1860-1913) married Francis Pembroke Perkins                   

B. John Jay Chapman (1862-1933) married (1)Mina Eliza Timmons married (2)Elizabeth Astor Winthrope Chanler

C. Eleanor Jay Chapman (1864-1929) married Richard Mortimer

D. Beatrix Jay Chapman(1864-1942) married (1)Sir George Head Barclay married (2)Raymond De Candolle

A.  Seventh Generation: Henry Grafton Chapman, Jr and Francis Pembroke Perkins

  
   JJChapmanbio: Henry Grafton Chapman, who died in his fifty-third year in January, 1913, was one of those quiet men who seem to bear no relation to the age they are born in. By his endowments, his tastes, and his education he was fitted to be an amateur of a kind very common in Europe,—one of the studious, well-nigh learned children of culture, who love books, pictures, music, philosophy, the lamp, and the quiet conclave with infinite good talk. If Henry Chapman had had the fortune to have been born in Europe or in China, and to inherit money, his life would have been a record of cheerful success, even as it was, in America, a record of cheerful toil. For some reason there was a glory about his boyhood. He was the prize boy of his set; brilliant things were predicted of him by every one. His talents and charms, his goodness and his good looks set off, as with a foil, a moral worth which every one found in him. A singular sweetness and gentleness of disposition remained to him all his life. It survived the more ambitious qualities with which we had all endowed him in his teens. It gilded his life and made his friends forgive him everything; for he was the most negligent of men. You could not see him unless you looked him up and dug him out from among his books and papers. He would hold you in converse on a corner of Broadway at midnight with a discussion about Plato, and would never miss you if he saw you not again for fifteen years—when he would resume the discussion with the old fervor. His talk was ready, apt, amusing, drenched in reading. He was always writing plays which were never produced, and essays just to clear his thoughts. He always had many varieties of tales, poems, and literary ventures on hand. Whenever I met him I wondered why I did n’t see more of him. But he was hard to see more of: he was elusive. He sought his own habitat, and would never come out of it, save on compulsion.The course of his experiments in life, before he settled down to steady work at literature, might easily be paralleled in the lives of many men of letters in all countries. After Harvard College and the Harvard Law School, came work in law offices, a few discouraging years at the bar, a few other years spent in business ventures. Then five years of organized reform. In this latter field my brother did valuable work, and for some years he was extremely active at Albany as an agent of the Civil Service League. He was also the editor of the League’s newspaper. Both his legal training and his literary facility came into play in these avocations. Mr. George McAneny writes me: “His quiet influence during the period of his active touch with public affairs did a great deal for the betterment of things in this town. I knew him best during his secretaryship in the Civil Service Reform League, to the work of which he gave a devoted order of service—just as his grandfather, John Jay, as a member of Governor Cleveland’s first Civil Service Commission, had given before him. He made ‘Good Government,’ the organ of the League, a much more serviceable organ than it ever had been before, adding to its influence everywhere. He proved, too, a most valuable aid in the handling of legislation affecting the Civil Service, proposed from year to year at Albany,—always, I believe, with good result. He went about everything quietly, but he did a lot of useful work.” Henry Chapman certainly was fitted to be a journalist of the first order, but he lacked the impulsion; and I cannot blame him for deserting reform, since this led to his taking up a kind of work for which he had a real gift—namely, translation. All his life long my brother wrote verses which were marked by singular ease and grace. He was the producer of the occasional verses demanded by his college class, by the Porcellian Club, by the OBK, etc. He could write any species of verse, and he loved to do so. His ear was true and very experienced. He knew a little Latin and Greek, and a great deal of French and German, which languages he had learned as a boy in Europe. He could write French and German, and could read, you might say, any modern language; for he had a passion for etymology and was always pushing his studies further in this field. He had a wide miscellaneous reading in English, French, and German, but his main hobby was modern philosophy, upon which he loved to hold forth. Dr. Baker, the musical adviser of G. Schirmer, with whom Henry was most closely associated in the work of translating songs, wrote as follows in the Bulletin of New Music: “In the death of Henry Grafton Chapman, which occurred on January 16 in New York, the house of G. Schirmer mourns the loss of a friend and gifted coadjutor, a man to whom the musical world owes a debt of gratitude and respect. Of highly versatile talent, Mr. Chapman’s lifework—the work which shall live after him—was finally found in the poetic reproduction in English of those choice poems by foreign writers to which music has been set by composers of genius. “Let none regard this work as a matter of small moment, as something to be tossed off in idle hours, or as something of low degree not to be ranked with the finer products of literary labor. It is true that, only too frequently, a ‘good working translation’ is the utmost ambition of the English versifier; a version which will ‘sing well,’ which rhymes fairly well, and does not conflict too glaringly in accentuation with the original;—as for ‘sense’ and ‘poetic feeling,’ these are made wholly secondary considerations, if considered at all. “Mr. Chapman’s work was on a different plane. He entered at once into the mood and spirit of the poem before him. Equally at home in styles naive, sentimental, humorous, capricious, or passionate, he then, by some genial alchemy of which he possessed the secret, transmuted the exotic prototype into English verse often equal in excellence to, and not seldom surpassing, the original in poetic flow and fervor. He still observed the metre and the accent, and the rhyme, too, wherever possible, but rendered these subordinate to the thought and expression, using them, like the foreign authors, as a vehicle for ideas and emotions, not as a jingle.

Eighth Generation: Children of Henry Grafton Chapman, Jr and Francis Pembroke Perkins

I. Henry Grafton Chapman, III (1888-1970) married Martha Minerva Altpeter

Henry Grafton Chapman was born on July 16, 1888, in New York, the child of Henry Grafton and Frances Pembroke. He had one son and one daughter with Martha Minerva Altpeter between 1922 and 1923. He died in October 1970 in Bonita, California, at the age of 82, and was buried there.

Ninth Generation: Children of Henry Grafton Chapman, III and Martha Minerva Altpeter

i. Elizabeth C Chapman(1922-1950)

ii. Robert G Chapman(1926-1974) married (1)Raymona J Reynolds married (2)Janette A Stubbs married (3)Margie L Rogers

B. Seventh Generation: John Jay Chapman (1862-1933) married (1)Mina Eliza Timmons married (2)Elizabeth Astor Winthrope Chanler

  John Jay CHAPMAN* was born on March 2, 1862, in New York. He married Minna Eliza TIMMINS and they had three children together. He then married Elizabeth Astor Winthrop and they had two children together. He died on November 4, 1933, in New York, at the age of 71, and was buried in Bedford, New York

JJ Chapman Bio: Biography He was born in New York City. His father, Henry Grafton Chapman, was a broker who eventually became president of the New York Stock Exchange. His grandmother, Maria Weston Chapman, was one of the leading campaigners against slavery and worked with William Lloyd Garrison on The Liberator. He was educated at St. Paul’s School, Concord and Harvard, and after graduating in 1885, Chapman traveled around Europe before returning to study at the Harvard Law School. He was admitted to the bar in 1888, and practiced law until 1898. Meanwhile he had attracted attention as an essayist of unusual merit. His work is marked by originality and felicity of expression, and the opinion of many critics has placed him in the front rank of the American essayists of his day. In 1887 Chapman assaulted a man for insulting his girlfriend, Minna Timmins. He punished himself for this act by putting his left hand into fire. It was so badly burnt he had to have it amputated. He married Minna Timmins in 1889 and they had two children, including future pilot Victor Chapman. Timmins died giving birth to their third child. Chapman later married Elizabeth Chanler. Chapman became involved in politics and joined the City Reform Club and the Citizens’ Union. He lectured on the need for reform and edited the journal The Political Nursery (1897-1901).

He is the subject of a biographical and critical essay by Edmund Wilson in The Triple Thinkers which recounts the reasons behind Chapman’s deliberately burning off his own left hand.

“Great Men” wrote John Jay Chapman, A.B. 1884, “are often the negation and opposite of their age. They give it the lie.” He was writing in 1897 about Ralph Waldo Emerson, but the remark states the theme of his own life and its defect. Chapman is one of America’s lost writers; indeed, he may be the best of them. On his particular subjects, literature and politics, he is unique, invaluable–and quite forgotten.

Chapman’s generation takes us from the Civil War to the time of Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Ford, and Edith Wharton. The son of a respected Wall Street figure and the great-granddaughter of John Jay, the nation’s first chief justice, Chapman studied law at Harvard before returning to New York City to practice. There he plunged into Reform politics, opposing Tammany Hall and in general attacking the pervasive corruption of the Gilded Age. Chapman was a man of extreme, sometimes violent impulses: his Harvard friends had called him “mad Jack.” His political work in the 1890s was by no means cloistered: though a patrician to his fingertips, he was more than willing to harangue the Broadway crowds at the tumultuous political rallies of the time and even to leave the platform to grapple with hecklers. Nevertheless, most of his reform efforts consisted of writing and organizing. From 1897 to 1901, he published at his own expense, and mostly wrote, a reformist monthly, the Political Nursery, which Edmund Wilson later called “one of the best written things of the kind which has ever been published anywhere.” In 1898 Chapman actively promoted Theodore Roosevelt as an independent reform candidate for governor of New York, but the alliance collapsed when Roosevelt chose instead to run, successfully, as the candidate of the state Republican organization, which Chapman held no better than Tammany Hall.

Perhaps the failure of Roosevelt’s reform candidacy stood in Chapman’s mind for the failure of reform itself, and helped push him to withdraw from politics. This he did around the turn of the century. At the same time, his circumstances had become easy enough for him to give up his law practice. After his first wife’s early death in 1897, he had married Elizabeth Chanler, a member of the Astor family, and by 1901 they had moved to an estate at Barrytown on the Hudson River. There Chapman concentrated on literary work.

Eighth Generation: Children of John Jay Chapman and Mina Elizabeth Timmons

I. Victor Emanuel Chapman(1890-1916)

II. John Jay Chapman(1893-1903)

III. Conrad Chapman(1896-1989) married Judith Daphne

I. Eighth Generation: Victor Emanuel Chapman(1890-1916)

  

 Victor Chapman Bio: Victor S. Chapman (April 17, 1890 in New York – June 24, 1916 near Douaumont) was a French-American pilot remembered for his exploits during World War I. He was the first American pilot to die in the war.Chapman was the son of American essayist John Jay Chapman. His mother, Minna Timmins, died in 1898, when he was eight. He and his father moved to France soon after. In France, Chapman obtained dual-citizen status as a French and US citizen. His father re-married, to Elizabeth Chanler, an Astor heiress, when Chapman was a teenager. Chapman returned to the United States in his late teens to attend Harvard University. After graduating, Chapman returned to Europe, spending time in France and in Germany. During this period, he became interested in architecture, becoming an expert in the field.[

When World War I broke out, his father and stepmother moved to London, England. However, Chapman decided to stay in France, joining the French Foreign Legion on August 30, 1914, and served in the 3rd March regiment of the Legion. He became friendly with four men during his days on the trenches: a Polish fighter who was known only as “Kohl”, and Americans Alan Seeger, Henry Fansworth, and David King. The trio of Americans watched as Kohl was killed by a bullet while walking with his friends. After Kohl’s death, Chapman and two other friends, (Norman Prince and Elliot Cowdin), were given an opportunity to fly in a fighter airplane. Chapman requested transfer to the Aéronautique Militaire, the army’s air arm. He attended flight school and was certified as a pilot. Chapman flew many missions for the 1st Aviation Group and was commissioned a sergeant. He was chosen as one of the founding members of N.124, the Escadrille Americane, also known as the Lafayette Escadrille. On June 17, 1916, he was flying over the Verdun sector when he was attacked by four German airplanes. During the engagement, Chapman suffered a head wound, most likely from an attack by then four-victory German flier Walter Höhndorf.[1] Chapman landed his airplane safely, with Höhndorf getting his fifth victory as a result. While recovering Chapman found out that his friend, Clyde Balsley had been wounded in a separate incident. Prior to his last flight Chapman put loaded oranges onto his aircraft, intending to take these to Balsley who was in hospital recuperating from his wounds.[2][3] Chapman was attacked north of Douaumont by German flying ace Leutnant Kurt Wintgens, a close friend of Höhndorf. With Wintgens flying a Halberstadt D.II that day against Chapman’s Nieuport 16, Wintgen soon gained the upper hand. Chapman was killed when his airplane crashed.]

Chapman earned many medals and commendations during his military career. Chapman was interested in the arts and in writing. He often found inspiration to write while he was in the middle of battles, and many of the letters he sent to his father were written in these circumstances. A book of these letters, called Letters from France, was published after his death. In his memory, the composer Charles Martin Loeffler, a friend of Chapman’s father, composed his quartet Music for Four Stringed Instruments.[4]

II. Eighth Generation: John Jay Chapman, Jr (1893-1903)

He was born in 1893, in New York. He had two brothers. He died as a child of drowning on August 13, 1903, in Austria. His mother died four years after his birth.

III Eighth Generation: Conrad Chapman(1896-1989) married Judith Daphne

Conrad CHAPMAN was born on December 24, 1896, in New York. His mother died after his birth. He married Judith Daphne about 1933. He died on August 18, 1989, in Boston, Massachusetts, at the age of 92, and was buried in Bedford, New York. He had no children.

Eighth Generation: Children of John Jay Chapman and Elizabeth Astor Winthrope Chanler

  

IV. Chanler Chapman (1901-1982) married Olivia “Livy” James

V. Sydney Ashley Chapman (1907-1994)

IV. Eighth Generation: Chanler Chapman (1901-1982) and Olivia “Livy” James

   Sports Illustrated June 13, 1977  by Robert H. Boyle Step In And Enjoy The Turmoil So says Chanler Chapman, 76. The slingshot and pinking cicadas with a .22 are about it, sportswise, but turmoilwise he upholds the honor of his family, an interesting feat

It was a splendid day in Paris in the 1920s when William Astor Chanler, former African explorer, big-game hunter, Turkish cavalry colonel and patron of the turf, limped into Maxim’s for lunch with a friend. The colonel had lost a leg, not on the field of battle but as the result, it was whispered, of a brawl in a bordello with Jack Johnson, the prizefighter. A familiar figure in Maxim’s, Colonel Chanler informed the headwaiter that he wished to be served promptly because one of his horses was running at Longchamp that afternoon. The colonel and his friend sat down, and when, after taking their order, their waiter did not reappear swiftly, the colonel began tussling with something beneath the table. With both hands he yanked off his artificial leg, bearing sock, shoe and garter, and hurled it across the restaurant, striking the waiter in the back. Colonel Chanler shouted, in French, “Now, may I have your attention?” Back home in the U.S., the colonel’s oldest brother, John Armstrong Chanler, known as Uncle Archie to members of the family, had a simpler way of obtaining service: when dining out, Uncle Archie would carry a pair of binoculars around his neck to keep close watch on his waiter’s comings and goings. With or without binoculars, Uncle Archie was likely to get attention wherever he went. He sported a silver-headed cane engraved with the words LEAVE ME ALONE. He had spent three and a half years involuntarily confined in the Bloomingdale lunatic asylum in White Plains, N.Y. because, among other peculiarities, he liked to dress as Napoleon and often went to bed wearing a saber. In a farewell note he left the night he escaped from Bloomingdale in 1900, Uncle Archie wrote to the medical superintendent, “You have always said that I believe I am the reincarnation of Napoleon Bonaparte. As a learned and sincere man, you therefore will not be surprised that I take French leave.”

Given the drabness of the present age, it is heartening to note that the spirit of the eccentric sporting Chanlers lives on in Barrytown, N.Y., 100 miles up the Hudson River from New York City. Here, in the decaying but still gracious estate country of Edith Wharton novels, a handful of Chanter descendants carry on in their own fashion. There is Richard (Ricky) Aldrich, grandnephew of Uncle Archie and grandson of Margaret Livingston Chanler Aldrich, who fought for the establishment of the U.S. Army Nursing Corps. Ricky, 36, manages Rokeby, the family seat and farm, where he collects and rebuilds antique iceboats (such as the Jack Frost, a huge craft that won championships in the late 19th century) and ponders the intricacies of Serbian, Croatian and Polish grammar. Ricky studied in Poland for a spell, but left in 1966 after he was caught selling plastic Italian raincoats on the black market. The most obvious fact about Ricky is that he seldom bathes. As one boating friend says, “Ricky would give you the shirt off his back, but who’d want it?”

Then there is Chanler A. Chapman, regarded by his kin as the legitimate inheritor of the family title of “most eccentric man in America.” As Ricky’s brother, J. Winthrop (Winty) Aldrich, says, “Only members of the Chanler family are fit to sit in judgment on that title.” Winty, who is Chanler Chapman’s first cousin once removed, says, “Television has done Upstairs, Downstairs, The Forsyte Saga and The Adams Chronicles, but they should do the Chanlers. The whole story is so improbable. And true.” Everyone who has met Chanler Chapman regards him as brilliantly daft. While teaching at Bard College, Saul Bellow, the Nobel laureate, rented a house on Chapman’s estate, Sylvania (“the home of happy pigs”), and found in him the inspiration for his novel Henderson the Rain King. In the novel, written as an autobiography, Henderson shoots bottles with a slingshot, raises pigs and carries on extravagantly in general. “It’s Bellow’s best book,” Chapman says, “but he is the dullest writer I have ever read.”

Now 76 and possessed of piercing brown eyes, a bristling mustache and wiry hair, Chapman nearly always wears blue bib overalls and carries a slingshot. He is fond of slingshots, because “they don’t make any noise,” and he shoots at what tickles his fancy. Not long ago he fired a ball bearing at a Jeep owned by his cousin, Bronson W. (Bim) Chanler, former captain of the Harvard crew, inflicting what Chapman calls “a nice dimple” in the left front fender. Ball bearings are expensive ammunition, however, so, for $4, Chapman recently bought 600 pounds of gravel. He calculates this supply of ammo should last at least five years.

Before his infatuation with slingshots, Chapman was big on guns. He hunted deer, small game and upland birds and ducks, mostly on his estate. Indeed, at one time he had 115 guns, and his shooting habits were such that friends who came to hunt once never cared, or dared, to return again. Chapman had only to hear the quack of a duck and he would let loose with a blast in the general direction of the sound. On a couple of occasions it turned out that he had fired toward hunters crouched in reeds, using a duck call. “Almost got a few people,” he would say matter-of-factly.

Chapman is the publisher of the Barrytown Explorer, a monthly newspaper that sells at the uncustomary rate of 25¢ a copy on the newsstand and $4 a year by subscription. The paper’s slogan, emblazoned above the logo, is WHEN YOU CAN’T SMILE, QUIT. “You can abolish rectitude,” as Chapman once expatiated opaquely, “you can abolish the laws of gravity, but don’t do away with good old American hogwash.”

The Explorer prints whatever happens to cross Chapman’s lively mind. “Opinions come out of me like Brussels sprouts,” he says. There are poems by Chapman (who always gives the date and place of writing, e.g., Kitchen, Sept. 13, 7:15 a.m.), and a regular Spiel column, also by Chapman, in which he offers his unique observations on the world (“A sunset may be seen at any time if you drink two quarts of ale slowly on an empty stomach” or “What’s good for the goose is a lively gander” or “Helen Hokinson has turned atomic” or “Close the blinds at night and lower the chances of being shot to death in bed. That goes for the district attorney who wants to be a judge”). Chapman always signs the Spiel column, “Yrs. to serve, C.A.C., pub.”

Chapman has been married three times. His first wife, from whom he was divorced, was Olivia James, a grandniece of Henry and William James. Robert, a son by that marriage, lives in a house in Florence, Italy, which his father thinks is called “the place of the devil.” (Robert reportedly used to live in a cave, where he made kites.) Another son by this marriage, John Jay Chapman II, lives in Barrytown. After attending Harvard, he went to Puerto Rico, where he became a mailman. He married a black woman, and they have several children. When Chanler Chapman’s old school, St. Paul’s, went coed, he was enthusiastic about his granddaughter’s chances of getting a scholarship. “She’s a she,” he said, ticking off reasons. “She’s a Chapman. She’s a Chanler. And she’s black.”

Five years ago, John Jay Chapman II persuaded post office authorities to transfer him from Puerto Rico back to Barrytown, where he now delivers the mail. Asked if his son truly likes delivering mail, Chapman exclaimed, “He can hardly wait for Christmas!” Not long ago. Chapman and Winty Aldrich, who lives with Ricky at Rokeby, the ancient family seat next door to Sylvania, were musing about the twists and turns in the family fortunes. Winty observed, “Isn’t it remarkable, Chanler, that Edmund Wilson called your father the greatest letter writer in America, and now your son may be the greatest letter carrier!” Chapman, who is, upon occasion, put off by his cousin, let the remark pass without comment. (“Winty is the essence of nothing,” Chapman says. “He has the personality of an unsuccessful undertaker and he uses semicolons when he writes. He knits with his toes.”)

Chapman’s father was John Jay Chapman, essayist, literary critic and translator. A man of strong convictions, John Jay Chapman atoned for having wrongly thrashed a fellow student at Harvard by burning off his left hand. At the same time, he used to go to bed at night wondering, according to Van Wyck Brooks, “What was wrong with Boston?”

Chanler Chapman’s mother, Elizabeth Chanler, was one of the orphaned great-great-grandchildren of John Jacob Astor, each of whom came into an inheritance of some $1 million. They were called the “Astor Orphans” by Lately Thomas in A Pride of Lions, a biography of the 19th-century Chanlers. “There was never anything wrong with the Chanler blood until crossed with the yellow of the Astor gold,” says Winty Aldrich.

By blood, the Chanler descendants are mostly Astor, with an admixture of Livingston and Stuyvesant. Knickerbocker patricians, they are related, by blood or marriage, to Hamilton Fish Sr., Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Jimmy Van Alen, Marion the Swamp Fox, Julia Ward Howe and General John Armstrong. It was the last who built Rokeby in 1815 after he blotted his copybook as Secretary of War by letting the British burn the Capitol and White House.

It has been said of Chanler Chapman that the genes on the Chapman side of the family provided the polish, while the Chanler genes imparted raw psychic energy. Chapman’s middle name is Armstrong; he was named in honor of Uncle Archie, his mother’s oldest brother. “Archie was a pure bedbug,” Chapman says. That may be understating the case. After escaping from the Bloomingdale asylum, where he had been committed by his brothers (with the help of Stanford White, the architect and a close family friend). Uncle Archie fled first to Philadelphia, where he was examined by William James, and thence to Virginia. He changed his last name to Chaloner and started a long legal battle to have himself declared sane in New York.

At his Virginia estate, Merry Mills, Archie indulged his love of horsemanship and hatred of automobiles. He discovered an obscure state law requiring the driver of a motor vehicle to “keep a careful look ahead for the approach of horseback riders, [and] if requested to do so by said rider, [such driver] shall lead the horse past his machine.” Mounted on horseback, clad in an inverness cape and armed with a revolver. Uncle Archie would patrol the road in front of Merry Mills demanding that motorists comply with the law. “A green umbrella was riveted to the cantle of his saddle, a klaxon to the pommel,” J. Bryan III, one of his admirers, wrote in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. “After nightfall, he hung port and starboard lights from the stirrups and what was literally a riding light from the girth. The klaxon was his warning, the revolver his ultimatum.”

In the midst of the legal battle for his sanity, Uncle Archie shot and killed a wife beater who had invaded his house. To commemorate the encounter, he sank a silver plate in the floor with the cryptic inscription HE BEAT THE DEVIL. He was absolved of the killing, which occurred in 1909, shortly after Harry K. Thaw shot Stanford White, but the New York Post noted, “The latest prominent assassin has taken the precaution to have himself judged insane beforehand.” Archie sued for libel, and the case dragged on to 1919, when he won both the suit and his fight for sanity in New York.

By now Uncle Archie had come to love automobiles and made peace with his brothers and sisters. He came visiting in a Pierce-Arrow he had had custom-made. Parts of the rear and front seats were removed to make room for a bed and a field kitchen, and the car was painted with blue and white stripes copied from a favorite shirt. Chanler Chapman would meet Uncle Archie in Manhattan, and they would drive back and forth between the Hotel Lafayette and Grant’s Tomb. “He told me he was the reincarnation of Pompey,” Chapman says, “but that he was going to have more luck than Pompey and take over the world. His eyes would gleam and glitter. He would also rub an emerald ring and say to the chauffeur when we came to a light, ‘Watch, it’s going to turn red!’ or, ‘Watch, it’s going to turn green! See!’ ” In Barrytown, Uncle Archie dined, as family members pretended not to notice, on ice cream and grass clippings.

At St. Chanler Chapman was nicknamed Charlie Chaplin, after his own exploits. From the start Chapman had what the St. Paul’s masters called “the wrong attitude.” Some years afterward he wrote a book with that title about his days at St. Paul’s. (In Teacher in America, Jacques Barzun praises The Wrong Attitude for Chapman’s “penetrating remarks.”) Once young Chapman jumped into an icy pond to win a $50 bet, and he collected a purse of $100 for promoting a clandestine prize fight in which he was knocked out. On another occasion, boys paid 50¢ apiece to watch Chapman fill his mouth with kerosene and strike a match close to it. Flames shot across the room. On the side, he dealt illegally in firearms, selling one Smith & Wesson .32 time after time. It jammed after every third or fourth round and, invariably. Chapman would buy it back from the disgruntled owner at a reduced price. A center in club football, he practiced swinging a knee smartly into the ribs of an opponent, but when he cracked the rib of a boy he liked, he felt such remorse that he gave the boy a silver stickpin shaped like a broken rib with a diamond mounted over the break.

Chapman was too young for World War I. He desperately wanted to serve after his half-brother, Victor, was shot down and killed while flying for the Lafayette Escadrille. Fortunately, he was distracted by his Uncle Bob, Robert Winthrop Chanler, the youngest, biggest and, in many ways, the most raffish of the Chanlers. “Uncle Bob dreaded the thought that Chanler would be filled with pieties,” says Winty Aldrich.

After studying art in Paris for nine years, Uncle Bob settled on a farm near Sylvania and ran for sheriff of Dutchess County. He won after acquiring acclaim by hiring a baseball team, which included Heinie Zimmerman of the Cubs, to play against all comers. While sheriff, Uncle Bob wore a cowboy suit and retained Richard Harding Davis as his first deputy. Having divorced his first wife, he returned to Paris, where he vowed to marry the most beautiful woman in the world. He fell in love with Lina Cavalieri, an opera singer, who, if not the most beautiful woman in the world, was certainly one of the most calculating. After only a week of marriage to Uncle Bob, she left him to live with her lover. That was bad enough, but then the news broke that Uncle Bob had signed over his entire fortune to her. Uncle Archie, down in Virginia busily fighting for his sanity, remarked to reporters, in words that became famous, “Who’s loony now?”

Uncle Bob divorced Lina, who settled for a lesser sum than his every cent, and back in New York he began living it up again, with nephew Chanler sometimes in tow. During this period he was doing paintings of bizarre animals and plants, which became the vogue, and he bought three brownstones in Manhattan, made one establishment of them and called it “the House of Fantasy.” The place was filled with macaws and other tropical birds, and parties there (orgies, some said) lasted for days. Ethel Barrymore is reputed to have remarked of the House of Fantasy, “I went in at seven o’clock one evening a young girl and emerged the next day an old woman.”

Chapman found two of his other Chanler uncles tedious. One, Winthrop Astor Chanler, was extremely fond of riding to hounds. Indeed, when Uncle Wintie died, his last words were “Let’s have a little canter.” Then there was Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler who, like all the Chanlers, was a staunch Democrat. In 1906 he ran for lieutenant governor of New York, with William Randolph Hearst at the head of the ticket. Hearst lost but Uncle Lewis won-at that time the lieutenant gubernatorial candidate ran separately-and in 1908 he was the Democrats’ choice to run for governor against Charles Evans Hughes. Hughes won, but the campaign waged by Uncle Lewis, which began with an acceptance speech on the front steps of Rokeby, still stirs the family. Not long ago, Hamilton Fish Sr. visited Rokeby, where he strongly urged Winthrop Aldrich to run for office. When Winty demurred, Uncle Ham, sole survivor of Walter Camp’s 1910 All-America football team, 6’4″ tall and ramrod straight at 88 years of age, said, “Look at your Uncle Lewis!” Winty replied, “But Uncle Ham, Stanley Steingut [State Assembly Speaker] and Meade Esposito [Brooklyn Democratic leader] wouldn’t know anything about Uncle Lewis. Nobody remembers Uncle Lewis.” Eyes blazing, Uncle Ham exclaimed, “Everyone remembers Uncle Lewis!”

Chanler Chapman went to Harvard in 1921. “He ran a gambling den there,” recalls Peter White, a cousin, who is a grandson of Stanford White. “He had a bootlegger, and all the gilded aristocracy from St. Paul’s, St. Mark’s and Groton as his customers. Chanler and his partners took in $300 to $400 a week. They didn’t drink until their customers left at three in the morning, but then they drank themselves blind.”

While in Cambridge, Chapman joined the Tavern Club founded by 19th-century Boston literati. “Two years ago Chanler celebrated his 50th anniversary as a member of the club,” Winty Aldrich says. “It is a tradition to present a gold medal to a man who has been a member for 50 years. Being proper Bostonians, the members do not have a new medal struck, but give the honoree one that had been presented to some deceased member. Chanler was very excited-I had heard he was to get the gold medal that belonged to Oliver Wendell Holmes-but for one reason or another he couldn’t attend the ceremony. The members were relieved. They thought Chanler might bite the medal in half, or hock it.”

After Harvard, Chapman went to Paris where he acquired his lasting affection for horse racing. He went broke at the track, and his Uncle Willie, Colonel William Astor Chanler (also known as African Willie, because he had explored parts of the Dark Continent where Stanley said he would not venture with a thousand rifles), gave him a job at an ocher mine he owned in the south of France. Six weeks in the mine were enough. Seeking fresh adventure, Chapman joined an acquaintance who was sailing a 47-foot ketch, the Shanghai, from Copenhagen to New York. But Chapman found the trip a bore-“The ocean is the dullest thing in the world. The waves just go chop, chop, chop”-except for a stop in Greenland, where he swindled the Eskimos by trading them worn-out blankets for furs. Off Nova Scotia he lost the furs and almost everything else when the Shanghai foundered on rocks, forcing all to swim to shore.

Back in the U.S., Chapman undertook a career as a journalist. He worked for the Springfield, Mass. Union for two years and then joined The New York Times. “Anyone who spends an extra week in Springfield has a weak mind,” he says. The Times assigned Chapman to the police beat on the upper East Side but Chapman decided that crime, like the ocean, “bores the hell out of me.” He spent a year playing cards with the other reporters and then quit to work for a book publisher.

In 1932 Chapman took over Sylvania and became a full-time farmer. He devoted a great deal of effort to organizing dairymen so they might obtain better milk prices, but division in the ranks made the task impossible. Then, during World War II, Chapman, with the seeming compliance of President Roosevelt, worked up a plan to seize the islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon off Newfoundland from Vichy France. He was called off at the last minute by F.D.R., who had apparently been having a lark at his neighbor’s expense. Chapman next volunteered as an ambulance driver for the American Field Service and served in Africa and Burma. Nautically, his luck seemed to pick up where it had left off with the sinking of the Shanghai-a freighter taking him to Egypt was torpedoed 600 miles southeast of Trinidad. “It was very entertaining,” he recalls. “The vessel was carrying 1,900 tons of high explosives.” Fortunately, the ship, which had been struck in its boilers, went down in seven minutes and did not explode. Chapman had the foresight to stick $200 in traveler’s checks and a bottle of Abdol vitamin pills inside his life jacket before scrambling into a lifeboat. After a week’s sail, he and the other survivors made it to Georgetown, British Guiana.

After the war, Chapman and his wife were divorced and he married Helen Riesenfeld, who started the Barrytown Explorer with him. She died in 1970, and three years later Chapman married Dr. Ida Holzberg, a widow and psychiatrist. “It’s convenient for Chanler to have his own psychiatrist in the house,” says Winty Aldrich. Like the second Mrs. Chapman, Dr. Holzberg is Jewish. While chaffing her recently, Chapman said, “Jesus Christ, maybe I should have gone Chinese the third time around.” Mrs. Chapman, or Dr. Holzberg, as she prefers to be called, is listed on the masthead of the Explorer, but her duties are undefined. “She wants to get off the masthead because she gets angry at me every other day,” Chapman says. Dr. Holzberg is petite, and Chapman affectionately refers to her as “Footnote” or “Kid,” as in “O.K., Footnote” or, “Kid, I like you, but you’ve got a long way to go.” As Chapman figures it, his wives are getting shorter all the time, but he likes that because they have a lot of bounce-back, Dr. Holzberg especially, “because she’s got such a low center of gravity.”

Over the years, Chapman has conducted his own radio interview show but at present he is off the air. His last sponsor was a dairy, for whom he used to deliver remarkable commercials, such as, “Their man is on the job at five in the morning. You might even see him back at a house for a second time at nine, but let’s skip over that.” Some of Chapman’s taped interviews are memorable, like the one in which he kept referring to the mayor of San Juan, P.R., where Chapman happened to be on vacation, as the mayor of Montreal. “San Juan, Señor,” the mayor would say plaintively every time Chapman referred to Montreal.

Perhaps Chapman’s finest accomplishment with the tape recorder came at a great family gathering at Rokeby in 1965. About 150 Chanlers, Astors, Armstrongs and other kin assembled to celebrate the sesquicentennial of the house. Among those present at the main table were William Chamberlain Chanler, who is known as Brown Willie, and Ashley Chanler, the son of African Willie. Ashley is generally accounted a bounder by the rest of the family, and on this occasion he was wearing a Knickerbocker Club tie, which disturbed Brown Willie, a retired partner in the proper Wall Street firm of Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam and Roberts. Believing that Ashley had been dropped from the Knickerbocker Club (as indeed he had been previously, for nonpayment of dues), Brown Willie voiced his annoyance and a loud debate ensued. “No one knew what was going on,” says Winty Aldrich. “It wasn’t until later that we found out it was all over a necktie. But Chanler was seated near them, and the moment the argument started he turned on his tape recorder, held up the microphone and began egging them on. When Ashley said that he had been reinstated in the Knickerbocker Club, Chanler shoved the microphone at Brown Willie and said, ‘You lose that round, counselor.’ “

Nowadays Chapman is primarily confining his attentions to the Explorer and his slingshot, with an occasional reversion to his guns. “Stop the presses!” he exclaimed the other day to a caller. “We’re replating for wood alcohol! An unlimited supply of energy. No fermentation at the North and South Poles, so the penguins and Eskimos are out of luck. First flight to Venus by booze.” He also was elated about reprinting a piece by Abram Hewitt on War Relic, “really a second-rate horse, still being promoted as quite a stud.”

The shooting in early spring, Chapman said, had been superb. The frozen Hudson was breaking up, and he liked to go down to the river with a .22 to shoot at pieces of ice. The most challenging shot was at twigs floating by. “Crack a little twig when it’s just barely moving!” he exclaimed. “It’s better than any shooting gallery. You feel like a newborn baby.” Friends who happen along at this time of the year may be greeted as William Humphrey, the novelist, was. Chapman insisted he shoot his initials into the snow by the front porch.

Chapman is hopeful that this will be a good year for 17-year locusts. Good, that is, from his point of view, not theirs. “They don’t come every 17-years, you know,” he says. “They come every five or six. I use .22 longs with birdshot in them and, boy, those locusts can absorb a lot of dust. They’re only three-quarters of an inch long, but they’re built out of armor plate. You have to hit them just right. I like to take a little stool that unfolds and pop them when they’re swarming. Shooting on the wing. That’s the only way. I wouldn’t shoot them sitting down.”

Chapman says now he’s just looking for things that give him pleasure. Has he a word of advice for others who would seek the happy life? Yes. “Things are going up and coming down,” he says. “Earthquakes are expected. Step in and enjoy the turmoil.”

That is Chandler Chapman Astor story!

Ninth Generation: Children of Chanler Chapman (1901-1982) married Olivia “Livy” James

i. John Jay Chapman(1926-2011) married Isabel FANTAUZZI

ii. Robert Robinson Chapman(1933-1997)

iii. Victor Chapman (1936-2011)

iv. Marie Weston Chapman (1938-2013)

I. Ninth Generation: John Jay Chapman and Isabel Fantuzzi

Obit  John Jay Chapman, II, 84, of Red Hook, NY, died Tuesday, January 11, 2011 at his home surrounded by his family. A veteran of the Korean War, he served with the US Marine Corps. He went on to work for the US Postal Service in Red Hook until his retirement. Jay was a member of St John’s Episcopal Church in Barrytown, NY. Born May 30, 1926, in Springfield, MA, he was the son of the late Chanler A. and Olivia (James) Chapman. He married Isabel Fantauzzi on Nov. 7, 1957 in New York City. He is survived by his wife: Isabel F. Chapman, a son: Tomas (Laura) Fantauzzi Millan of Tivoli and their children Samot (Tosha) Millan, and Cesar Millan, a son: Perfecto Millan of Red Hook, and his sons Alexis & David Millan, a daughter: Raquel Chapman of Paris, France and her children Julian & Edward Bricambert, a son: Antonio Millan of Puerto Rico, and his children Elian & Rosibel Millan, a son: John Plail of Texas, a sister: Maria Weston Chapman of Rhinebeck, a brother: Victor Chapman of Oregon, and cousins: J. Winthrop Aldrich, Richard Aldrich, and Rosalind Aldrich Michahelles. A brother, Robert Robertson Chapman, predeceased him  in 1996. Funeral services will be held at 1:30PM on Sunday, January 16th, at St. John the Evangelist, Church, River Rd, Barrytown, NY.

Five years ago, John Jay Chapman II persuaded post office authorities to transfer him from Puerto Rico back to Barrytown, where he now delivers the mail. Asked if his son truly likes delivering mail, Chapman exclaimed, “He can hardly wait for Christmas!” Not long ago. Chapman and Winty Aldrich, who lives with Ricky at Rokeby, the ancient family seat next door to Sylvania, were musing about the twists and turns in the family fortunes. Winty observed, “Isn’t it remarkable, Chanler, that Edmund Wilson called your father the greatest letter writer in America, and now your son may be the greatest letter carrier!”

i. Ninth Generation: Robert R Chapman (1933-1997)

Robert Robertson Chapman was born on March 8, 1933, in Red Hook, New York. In 1952 he saw action in the Korean War. He had two brothers and two sisters. He died on March 1, 1997, at the age of 63 in Broward Florida. I believe he was unmarried.

Robert, a son by that marriage, lives in a house in Florence, Italy, which his father thinks is called “the place of the devil.” (Robert reportedly used to live in a cave, where he made kites.)

ii. Ninth Generation: Victor Chapman (1936- 2011)

Chapman, Victor W. 8/23/1949 3/13/2011 Victor was born in Poughkeepsie, N.Y He was a counselor for Multnomah County and the Veterans Administration. He died on March 11, 2011, in Oregon, at the age of 75.

iii. Ninth Generation: Maria W Chapman(1937-2013)

Maria Weston Chapman was born on March 26, 1937, in Boston, Massachusetts. She had three brothers. She died on November 25, 2013, in Rhinebeck, New York, at the age of 76, and was buried in Barrytown, New York.

a. Eighth Generation: Sydney Ashland Chapman(1907-1994)

She was born in 1907 in New York. She had one brother. She died in 1994 at the age of 87 in Barrytown, where she had spent her life. She was unmarried

C.  Seventh Generation: Eleanore Jay CHAPMAN(1864-1929) married Richard Mortimer(1852-1918)

Eleanor Jay CHAPMAN was born on November 7, 1864, in New York. She married Richard Mortimer on April 26, 1886, in New York. She had four children by the time she was 27. She died on December 9, 1929, in Tuxedo,New York, at the age of 65

 William Yates Mortimer, who was educated in Europe, married Elisabeth Thorpe, daughter of Aaron Thorpe of Albany. He inherited the bulk of his father’s estate and by clever management greatly increased his property. He died in 1891, leaving a large sum to charity, and survived by his widow and two sons, Richard Mortimer, who married Miss Eleanor Jay Chapman, grand-daughter of the late Hon. John Jay, and Stanley Mortimer, who married Miss Tissie Hall, daughter of the late Valentine Hall.

Eighth Generation: Children of Eleanore Jay Chapman and Richard Mortimer

a. Mary Eleanore Mortimer(1887- ) married Maxime Hubert Furland

b. Stanley Grafton Mortimer(1888-1947) married Kathleen Hunt Tilford

c. Richard Mortimer, Jr(1889-1918)

d. Wilfreda Mortimer(1891-1946) married John Morris RUTHERFURD

a. Eighth Generation: Mary Eleanore Mortimer(1887- ) married Maxime Hubert Furland

Mary Eleanor MORTIMER was born on April 25, 1887, in New York. She married Maxime Hubert Furlaud on November 29, 1885. They had two children during their marriage. Her husband was active producing fine cognac with the label Hubart Furland Cognac. He died in Argentina at age 95. They were married 83 years!

Mary Eleanor Mortimer is known for her sculpture.

a. Ninth Generation: Children of Mary Eleanore Mortimer(1887- ) married Maxime Hubert Furland

i. Richard Mortimer Furland(1923- ) married Isobel

ii. Maxime Jay Furland(1925-1999) married Alice E Nelson

i. Ninth Generation: Richard Mortimer Furland(1923- ) married Isobel

Bio: Richard Mortimer Furlaud was born in 1923. Richard currently lives in Palm Beach, Florida. Before that, Richard lived in Palm Beach, FL in 2011. Before that, Richard lived in New York, NY from 1994 to 2012.

Richard Mortimer Furlaud is related to Isabel Furlaud, who is 81 years old and lives in Palm Beach, FL. Richard Mortimer Furlaud is also related to Richard Furlaud, who is 63 years old and lives in New York, NY.

He was a successful pharmaceutical executive worked with

          Tenth Generation: Children of Richard Mortimer Furland and Isobel

                Richard Furland (1943)

ii. Ninth Generation: Maxime Jay Furland married Alice E Nelson

Maxime Jay Furlaud was born on June 29, 1925, in New York. He married Alice E Nelson in 1970. He died on March 3, 1999, in Barnstable, Massachusetts, at the age of 73, and was buried in Truro, Massachusetts. He was a screenwriter and playwriter. He was also involved with gestalt therapy

D.  Seventh Generation: Beatrix Mary Jay CHAPMAN(1864-1942) married (1)Sir George Head Barclay (1862–1921)  married (2)Raymond  DeCandolle

                                          Beatrix Mary Jay CHAPMAN was born in 1864 in New York. She married Sir George Head Barclay and they had one daughter. Her first marriage ended in divorce and she then married Raymond De Candolle whom she had developed a relationship with in June 1920 in London. She died on December 12, 1942, at the age of 78.

Perhaps the most fashionably-attended wedding so far in the season was that which took place at high noon yesterday at the picturesque old Jay homestead, Bedford House, Katonah, Westchester, between Miss Beatrix Chapman, daughter of Mrs. Henry G. Chapman, and granddaughter of the Hon. John Jay, and George Barclay, Secretary of the British Legation at Washington, of Monkhams, Essex, England NY Times

Bio: Sir George Head Barclay b. 23 March 1862, d. 26 January 1921  Sir George Head Barclay was born on 23 March 1862 at Walthamstow, Essex, England.1 He was the son of Henry Ford Barclay and Richenda Louisa Gurney.1 He died on 26 January 1921 at age 58.      He was educated at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.1 He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England.1 He held the office of Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Iran between 1908 and 1912.1 He was invested as a Commander, Royal Victorian Order (C.V.O.).2 He was invested as a Knight Commander, Order of St. Michael and St. George (K.C.M.G.).2 He was invested as a Knight Commander, Order of the Star of India (K.C.S.I.).2

Eighth Generation: Children of Eleanore Jay Chapman(1864-1942) and Sir George Head Barclay (1862–1921)

a. Eighth Generation: Dorothy Katherine Barclay(1893–1953) married Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard (1885-1948)

Bio: Dorothy Katherine Barclay, b. between 1886 and 1890, d. 15 January 1953    Dorothy Katherine Barclay was born between 1886 and 1890 at Rome, Italy.1 She was the daughter of Sir George Head Barclay. She married Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard, 1st Bt., son of Hugh Coleridge Downing Kennard and Helen Wyllie, on 5 April 1911.2 She and Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard, 1st Bt. were divorced in 1918.2 She died on 15 January 1953.2 Her married name became Kennard.

: Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard, 1st Bt. was born on 12 May 1885.1 He was the son of Hugh Coleridge Downing Kennard and Helen Wyllie.2 He married, firstly, Dorothy Katherine Barclay, daughter of Sir George Head Barclay, on 5 April 1911.1 He and Dorothy Katherine Barclay were divorced in 1918.1 He married, secondly, Mary Graham Orr-Lewis, daughter of Sir Frederick Orr-Lewis, 1st Bt. and Maude Helen Mary Booth, on 21 July 1924.3 He died on 7 October 1948 at age 63.3

     He was created 1st Baronet Kennard, of Fernhill, co. Southampton [U.K.] on 11 February 1891.4 He was with the Diplomatic Service between 1908 and 1919.1

Ninth Generation: Children of Dorothy Katherine Barclay and Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard

i. Sir Laurence Charles Ury Kennard, b. 6 Feb 1912, d. 3 May 1967

ii. Lt.-Col. Sir George Arnold Ford Kennard, b. 27 Apr 1915, d. 13 Dec 1999

i. Ninth Generation: Sir Laurence Charles Ury Kennard married Joan Liesl Perschke

     Sir Laurence Charles Ury Kennard, 2nd Bt. was born on 6 February 1912.1 He was the son of Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard, 1st Bt. and Dorothy Katherine Barclay.2 He married Joan Liesl Perschke, daughter of William Thomas Perschke, on 27 April 1940.1 He died on 3 May 1967 at age 55, without issue.3

     He was educated at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.1 He was created 2nd Baronet Kennard, of Fernhill, co. Southampton

ii. Ninth Generation: Lt Col Sir George Arnold Ford Kennard married (1)Cecilia Violet Cokayne Maunsell                   Married (2)Mollie Jesse Rudd Wyllie       Married (3)Nichola Carew, Married (4)Georgina 

Lt.-Col. Sir George Arnold Ford Kennard, 3rd Bt. was born on 27 April 1915.2 He was the son of Sir Coleridge Arthur Fitzroy Kennard, 1st Bt. and Dorothy Katherine Barclay.3 He married Cecilia Violet Cokayne Maunsell, daughter of Major Cecil John Cokayne Maunsell and Wilhelmine Violet Eileen Fitz-Clarence, on 12 October 1940.2 He and Cecilia Violet Cokayne Maunsell were divorced in 1958.4 He married, secondly, Mollie Jesse Rudd Wyllie, daughter of Hugh Wyllie, on 30 September 1958.4 He and Mollie Jesse Rudd Wyllie were divorced in 1974.4 He married, thirdly, Nichola Carew, daughter of Peter Gawen Carew and Ruth Chamberlain, in 1985.1 He married, fourthly, Georgina Wernher, daughter of Maj.-Gen. Sir Harold Augustus Wernher, 3rd Bt. and Anastasia Mikhailovna de Torby, Countess de Torby, in December 1992 at London, England.4 He and Nichola Carew were divorced in 1992.1 He died on 13 December 1999 at age 84.2

He was educated at Eton College, Windsor, Berkshire, England.2 He was commissioned in 1936, in the service of the 4th Queens Own Hussars.4 He fought in the Second World War, where he was mentioned in despatches twice, and was a POW (1939-41).2 He was Lieutenant-Colonel of the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars between 1955 and 1958.4 He was with Cement Marketing Company between 1967 and 1979.4 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baronet Kennard, of Fernhill, co. Southampton [U.K., 1891] on 3 May 1967.4 On his death, his baronetcy became extinct.

Child of Lt.-Col. Sir George Arnold Ford Kennard, 3rd Bt. and Cecilia Violet Cokayne Maunsell

                        Tenth Generation: Zandra Kennard+3 b. 17 Jun 1941

Zandra married Maj. John Middleton Neilson Powell.5 They had two children.

                       Eleventh Generation: Edward Coleridge Cockayne Powell

                        Eleventh Generation: 

The Family of William JAY 

Fourth generation: WILLIAM JAY (1789-1858) married Hannah Augusta McVikar
  
WILLIAM JAY(jj4/5) was John and Sally Jay’s youngest son. He was born thirteen years after his brother Peter. Peter was born in 1776, the year of the Declaration of Independence. William was born in 1789, the year of the Ratification of the Constitution and the induction of George Washington as President of the United States!

William was educated in Albany, while his father was serving as Governor of the State. He broke family tradition and went to Yale in 1808, and then returned to Albany to study law. Trouble with his vision prevented him from a full time legal career and he returned back to care for his father in Bedford. In 1818 he was appointed a Westchester County judge by DeWitt Clinton and served with honor as judge until 1843.

In 1812 he married Augusta McVickar, described as a woman in whom “were blended all the Christian virtues”. They lived in the Katonah house where they raised their six living children (two children died in infancy).

William Jay became noted for his anti-slavery opinions and his strong Christianity. He became vice president and co founder of the American Bible Society.

Hannah Augusta McVICKER was born on November 11, 1790, in New York, New York, the child of John and Anna. She married WILLIAM JAY on September 4, 1812. They had six children in 20 years. She died in 1851 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the age of 61.
Fifth Generation: CHILDREN OF WILLIAM JAY and HANNAH McVIKER

I. ANNA JAY(1813-1849)

II. MARIA BANYAR JAY(1815-1851)

III. JOHN JAY II (1817-1894)

IV. SARAH LOUISA JAY(1819-1905)

V. ELIZA JAY(1823-1869)

VI. AUGUSTA (Fusty)JAY(1833-1917)

I. Fifth Generation: ANNA JAY (1813-1849) married Rev. Lewis P. W. BALCH(1814-1875)

ANNA JAY(wm5/1)was the oldest child born to William and Augusta Jay. She married the Rev. Lewis Penn Witherspoon Balch, the rector of St. Bartholomews Church in New York. They had five children, of which three lived to adulthood. Anna Jay died after the birth of her youngest child. The Rev. Balch remarried Emily Wiggins. Anna Jay Balch was buried along with her second son who died in infancy in the Jay Cemetery.

Rev Lewis P W Balch attended three years at West Point Military Academy, and one year at Princeton College, where he graduated in 1834. He entered General Theological Seminary in New York. While still Deacon he was called to St Bartholomew’s Church in New York where he remained from 1837 to 1850 and cleared the church of debt. He was obliged to leave New York for his health, and for five years he was rector of parishes of Chester and West Chester, Pennsylvania. He held several other posts from 1855 to 1866. During this time he was secretary of the House of Bishops. From 1866 to 1871 he was canon of the Cathedral of Montreal. In 1874 he was appointed rector of Grace Church, Detroit, where he stayed until his death some six months later. Dr Balch was a man of most charming manners. As a preacher he was at once impressive and powerful, and at times eloquent. His sermon at Newport on the death of Lincoln produced an effect on those who heard it which is still remembered. He had an extraordinary power of raising money for churches in debt. He secured the discharge of indebtedness of eleven churches during the forty years of his ministry.

Their children were Augusta, b Dec 26, 1839. d 1888;m John Neilson, m G.A. Peabody, Salem, Mass., Elizabeth, b April 20, 1845, d May 25, 1890, Anna, died infant, Lewis P W, b July 7, 1847, d Aug 9, 1909

II. Fifth Generation: MARIA BANYAR JAY (1815-1851) married John Frederick BUTTERWORTH

MARIA BANYER JAY(wm5/2)married John Butterworth and lived in England. They had two children, the youngest, Eliza became a Roman Catholic nun in England. The oldest daughter, Augusta, married William Smith. MARIA BANYAR JAY was born on April 28, 1815.. She died on November 17, 1851, at the age of 36, after the birth of her second daughter.

III. Fifth Generation: JOHN JAY, II (1817-1894) married ELEANORE FIELD

JOHN JAY, II lawyer, born in New York city, June 23, 1817, died in New York city, May 5, 1894. His father was William Jay, lawyer, judge and author, and his grandfather, John Jay, first Chief Justice of the United States. The subject of this memoir graduated from Columbia College in 1836, and read law in the office of Daniel Lord, jr. 

 The subject of this memoir graduated from Columbia College in 1836, and read law in the office of Daniel Lord, jr. He was born to fortune, having inherited valuable real estate in the city of New York, and was able to devote his fine intellect mainly to public affairs. He was a Republican and an active advocate of the abolition of slavery. An address delivered by him in 1856, on “America Free or America Slave” was circulated by his party as a campaign document. During the Civil War, he aided in the formation of the National Union League and later became one of the founders of the Union League club of this city and its president 1866-70 and again in 1877. Appointed by President Grant as Minister to Austria in 1869, he had the good fortune to negotiate treaties of benefit to his country7. Mr. Jay was a favorite speaker upon public occasions and contributions from his pen were always welcomed by the magazines and newspapers. Under Gov. Cleveland, Mr. Jay was appointed one of three commissioners to put in operation the civil service laws of the State, and his associates Messrs. Richmond and Schoonmaker, both Democrats, elected him chairman of the commission. It was he who, pursuant to the request of a meeting of Americans in Paris in 1869, suggested to the Union League club the establishment of an Art Museum in New York. This project, carried out by the members of the club, resulted in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Mr. Jay married in 1837 Eleanor, daughter of Hickson W. Field, and their children are Col. William Jay, the lawyer; Eleanor, widow of Henry G. Chapman; Mary, wife of William H. Schietfelin ; and Anna, wife of Lieutenant General von Schweinitz of the Royal Prussian Army. Col. William Jay is president of the Coaching and Meadow Brook Hunt clubs, a vestryman of Trinity Church, a governor of the Knickerbocker Club and director in The Continental Trust Co., and lieutenant colonel by brevet in the volunteer army of the United States. Obit NYTim

IV. Fifth Generation: SARAH LOUISA JAY (1819-1905) married Alexander Bruen 

SARAH LOUISA JAY(wm5/4) married Alexander Bruen in 1848. They had four children one of whom, Augusta(Q1) died in childhood. Their second daughter Alexandra married George Elmore Ide, Rear Admiral in the United States Navy and both were buried in the Jay Cemetery.

Their third child and oldest son Alexander Jay Bruen(wm6/16) studied law. He married Constance Fiedler in 1907. They had five children, four of whom grew to adulthood.

V. Fifth Generation: ELIZA JAY(1823-1869) married Henry Edward Pellew

Eliza Jay was born in 1823 as the fifth daughter of William and Hannah. She married Henry Edward Pellew and moved to London. They had three children as noted and she died in 1869 after the birth of her third child, who also died the next year.

RoyalBio: HENRY EDWARD, 6th Viscount Exmouth, b. 26 Apr. 1828. Only son of the Hon Very Rev. George Pellew. He was. Educated at Eton, then Trinity College at Cambridge where he received a B.A., (Bachelor of Arts) 1850; M.A., (Master of Arts) 1853. Rowing ‘blue,’ 1849. Went to America, 1873, where he was naturalized. Organized, with Theodore Roosevelt, Bureau of Charities in New York. Married 1stly, 5 Oct. 1858, ELIZA JAY, daughter of the Hon. Judge William Jay, of New York, and granddaughter of John Jay. They had two children, the oldest William, a writer of Jane Austin novels and the life of John Jay.

VI. Fifth Generation: AUGUSTA (Fusty) JAY (1833-1917) married Henry Edward Pellew

Augusta, (Fusty) Jay, was the youngest child. When AUGUSTA (Fusty) JAY was born on May 29, 1833, in New York, her father, WILLIAM, was 43 and her mother, Hannah, was 42. She married Henry Edward PELLEW after her sister’s death, on May 14, 1873. They had one child during their marriage. She died on January 24, 1917, at the age of 83.
 

JAY FAMILY PORTRAITS BY DANIEL HUNTINGTON

DANIEL HUNTINGTON
(Wiki) Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 – April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York City, New York, the son of Benjamin Huntington, Jr. and Faith Trumbull Huntington; his paternal grandfather was Benjamin Huntington, delegate at the Second Continental Congress and first U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

He studied at Yale with Samuel F.B. Morse, and later with Henry Inman (painter). From 1833 to 1835 he transferred to Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he met Charles Loring Elliott, who encouraged him to become an artist. He first exhibited his work at the National Academy of Design in 1836. Subsequently he painted some landscapes in the tradition of the Hudson River School. Huntington made several trips to Europe, the first in 1839 traveling to England, Rome, Florence and Paris with his friend and pupil Henry Peters Gray. On his return to America in 1840, he painted his allegorical painting “Mercy’s Dream”, which brought him fame and confirmed his interest in inspirational subjects. He also painted portraits and began the illustration of The Pilgrim’s Progress. In 1844, he went back to Rome. Returning to New York around 1846, he devoted his time chiefly to portrait-painting, although he painted many genre, religious and historical subjects.[1] From 1851 to 1859 he was in England. He was president of the National Academy of Design from 1862 to 1870, and again in 1877-1890.[1] He was also vice president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[2]

The REPUBLICAN COURT: Reception of Mrs Washington

Lady Washington’s Reception – large 1867 engraving after Daniel Huntington painting

(Jay Heritage Center Collection)  The line and stipple engraving above is one of several recent gifts made to the Jay Heritage Center this month. The antique print was produced by A.H. Ritchie in 1867 and based on the original 1861 painting by Daniel Huntington titled “The Republican Court.” Huntington’s painting, was completed at the beginning of the Civil War; the scene harkened back to what was seen in hindsight as a more harmonious time between the states — the founding of our union –and it represented an idealized assembly of the leaders of that period (Northern and Southern) in a European, court like setting. The image prominently features John Jay, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton on the left, Martha Washington on the dais, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington center ground and Sarah Livingston Jay on the far right and many other familiar personages of the Revolutionary War.

Daniel Huntington (1816 – 1906) won acclaim and prominence as the favored portraitist of New York Society after the Civil War. Though he was equally skilled at genre works and Hudson River style landscapes, he is best known for his likenesses of presidents, statesmen and other distinguished Americans including his painting of Abraham Lincoln that hangs at the Union League Club in Manhattan where the Jays were also members. Huntington’s training included studying with Jay family colleagues like John Trumbull (who is pictured in the engraving above), and Samuel F. B. Morse, then president of the National Academy of Design, whose successful career as an artist preceded his renown as an inventor. Huntington’s leadership roles in the artistic community were many: he was a member of the National Academy of Design for most of his life and served as its president for 22 years (1862 – 1870; 1877 – 1891). He was a founder and president of the Century Association and as vice-president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art for 33 years, he helped that institution expand and grow in stature. Differentiating it from the painting, the popular steel engraving was retitled “Lady Washington’s Reception” and a key identifying each of the 64 individuals shown was printed in magazines and newspapers of the time.

The original oil painting is at the Brooklyn Museum of. Art:www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/objects/487   Jay Heritage Center 210 Boston Post Road. Rye, NY 10580.  (914) 698-9275 Email: jayheritagecenter@gmail.com

Daniel Huntington turned to portraiture painting late in his career and painted the portraits of many individuals. Part of this was portraits of relatives of John Jay painted between 1860 and 1880. This included portraits of John Clarkson Jay, Laura Prime Jay, with child, (Mrs John Clarkson Jay), Dr Henry Augustus Du Bois, Constance Fielder Bruen, (Mrs Alexander  Bruen ), Eleanore Kingsland Field Jay (Mrs John Jay, II), Alice Jay, Frederick Prime, and William Jay. It also includes one miniature, probably painted after Sarah Livingston Jay death based on an existing miniature

SARAH LIVINGSTON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington(1816-1906)  



SARAH LIVINGSTON JAY (jj4/1)

Sarah Livingston Jay, was a charming, warm, intelligent woman, who loved to entertain and give parties. She provided a needed balance to John Jay, who was serious and ponderous. When John Jay was sent to Spain during the Revolution, they sailed with the French Ambassador who was a very difficult person. A storm crippled the vessel and they floated in the Atlantic awaiting rescue. Mrs. Jay learned that it was the Ambassador’s birthday and opened her baggage trunks to break out a Gala for him! While in Paris she became good friends with the Marquise de Lafayette and because of similarity of looks was often mistaken for her. The Paris Opera audience once rose to its feet thinking on her entrance that Mrs. Jay was Queen. Before she left Paris the Marquise gave her clothing that she wore when she entertained on her return to New York. This apparently upset many of the ladies of New York, who could not compete with her finery. Her “salon” became a place to be seen, and her guests included the Beekmans, the Clarksons, the Stirlings, the de Peysters, the Van Cortlands, the Rutherfords, the Van Rensselaers, and the Ralph Izards. She died at age 45, on May 28,1802, just before the completion of their retirement home in Katonah. The list of arrangements for her funeral included as guests, in addition to the family, almost every important family name in New York. She was buried in the Family Vault in the Bowerie and her remains later removed to the Jay Cemetery plot

 MARY RUTHERFURD CLARKSON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington


Mary Clarkson was the only child of General Matthew Clarkson and Mary RUTHERFURD. She married Peter Augustus Jay, the oldest son of John Jay and Sarah Livingston. They had seven children almost all or their spouses were also painted by Daniel Huntington!  

1870

Frick Digital Archive Collection

Artist: Daniel Huntington Medium: Pastel Comment: Photograph of original oil on canvas in the John Jay Collection, La Jolla, San Diego, Califonia, USA

  JOHN CLARKSON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington (1816-1906)

Sitter: Dr. John Clarkson Jay.  DATE:1872 painting (visual work) canvas.  oil (paint).  H: 30 in, W: 25



He was the son of Peter A. Jay and grandson of Founding Father John Jay, diplomat, first Chief Justice of the United States and two time Governor of New York State. J. C. Jay graduated from his father and grandfather’s alma mater Columbia in 1827, and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1831. In addition to his practice of medicine, he made a specialty of conchology, and acquired the most complete and valuable collection of shells in the United States.[1] This and his costly library on this branch of science were purchased by Catherine Wolfe and presented, in memory of her father, to the American Museum of Natural History, where it is known as the Jay Collection.

LAURA PRIME JAY with Child (wife of John Clarkson Jay)

ARTIST: Daniel Huntington, 14 Oct 1816 – 18 Apr 1906

SITTER: Laura Prime Jay, 1812 -1888 Oil on canvas. 76.8cm x 63.5cm (30 1/4″ x 25″), Accurate
DATE: 1900: Current Owner: Museum of the City of New York

He married Laura Prime (1812-1888) and they had seven children that lived to adulthood. Laura Prime’s father was Nathaniel Prime, a prominent NY banker and one of the wealthiest men in the colony. Her brother Frederick Prime married Mary Rutherfurd Jay, John Clarkson Jay’s sister.
After the death of his father in 1848, when he was 35 years of age, he moved from his home in New York City on Bond Street to the house in Rye, that his father had rebuilt and lived there with his wife Laura for the rest of his life.


ALICE JAY daughter of John Clarkson Jay

Artist: Daniel Huntington,  1816-1906

Sitter: Alice Jay. Date about 1900. Oil on canvas. Given to the Jay Heritage Center in 2012.

                   Written by Suzanne Clary  

The Jay Heritage Center (JHC) recently received an extraordinary gift from one of John Jay’s descendants. In celebration of the continued restoration of the 1838 Jay House in Rye, Ada Hastings of Great Barrington, Massachusetts and her family magnanimously donated a portrait of John Jay’s great granddaughter that once hung in the mansion’s Drawing Room. The painting will be unveiled to the public for the first time on May 15, 2011.
The luminescent painting of a young Alice Jay by pre-eminent artist Daniel Huntington is documented in sepia toned family photos from 1886; it is visible hanging in a prominent location next to two other famous artworks originally owned by the Jays of Rye: Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of John Jay (which today is on view at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.) and Asher Durand’s depiction of Peter Augustus Jay (which belongs to New York Hospital where Peter Augustus Jay served as President of the Board.)

The young subject of the painting, Alice Jay, along with her parents and siblings, lived both in New York and at the Rye estate during the mid and late 19th century. Windows into Alice’s life and times, particularly during the Civil War, are well documented in family letters and diaries. Alice’s father, Dr. John Clarkson Jay, was John Jay’s grandson and a vocal opponent of slavery like his grandfather and father before him. Through the local Episcopal church where he served on the vestry, he was instrumental in spearheading efforts in Rye to recruit volunteers for the Union efforts during the Civil War, a campaign which drew enlistments from Alice’s two older brothers, Peter, who became Captain of a local militia, and John, who served as an assistant surgeon. Alice’s sister kept a diary in which she wrote proudly in 1862, “Rye is called the banner town of the county for she has raised more men by volunteering than any of the other towns.”

    

Dr  HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS, husband of CATHARINE HELENA JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington 1816-1909

Subject: Henry Augustus Du Bois, oil on canvass. Owned by John Jay Du Bois

 

Henry Augustus was the fourth child of Cornelius and Sarah Ogden Du Bois. He was educated in Paris and then went to College of Physicians and Surgeons for his M.D. He returned to France to study medicine and then returned to New York in 1834, a year before he was married to Catharine Helena Jay, the grand daughter of John Jay. He practiced in New York until 1840, and because of poor health retired. His father inherited land between the banks of the Mahoning River in Ohio and they were involved with the settlement of a new community, Newton Falls. During this time he was president of the Virginia Channel Coal Co. They moved back to New Haven in 1854, where he lived until he died at age 76. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery.

ANNA MARIA JAY married Henry Evelyn PIERREPONT

Artist:   Daniel Huntington  1816-1906

Sitter:  Anna Maria Jay PIERREPONT, oil on canvas, given to the Jay Heritage Center June 2015

  
ANNA MARIA JAY** Birth 12 Sep 1819 in New York City, New York, Death 2 Jan 1902 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, married HENRY EVELYN PIERPONT Birth 8 Aug 1808 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, Death 28 Mar 1888 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, They had six children.


Henry Evelyn Pierrepont:The second son of Hezekiah Beers and Anna Maria Constable Pierrepont, Henry Evelyn was born in Brooklyn on August 8, 1808. Henry Evelyn was educated in New York City and quickly acquired his father’s prominence among Brooklyn’s elite. Upon the death of H.B. Pierpont, William Constable, the eldest Pierrepont son, took over the family’s upstate properties while Henry Evelyn remained in Brooklyn, maintaining the family’s influence on, and commitment to, the city’s development. On December 1, 1841, Henry Evelyn married Anna Maria Jay, daughter of Peter Augustus Jay and Mary Rutherford Clarkson, and granddaughter of John Jay, governor of New York (1795-1801) and the first Chief Justice of the United States. Together the couple had six children, including Henry Evelyn Pierrepont II and John Jay Pierrepont.

ELLEN ALMIRA LOW married HENRY EVELYN PIERRPONT, II

ARTIST Daniel Huntington, American, 1816-1906 MEDIUM Oil on canvas  DATES 1847 DIMENSIONS 64 x 53 15/16 in. (162.5 x 137 cm) (show scale) INSCRIPTIONS Inscribed verso: “Ellen Almira Low 24 yrs. 3 mos./ Hariette Low 4 yrs. 8 mos./ Ellen Almira Low 1 yr./ D. Huntington. Pinxt./ N.Y. June 30, 1847.”

CREDIT LINE Gift of Mrs. William Raymond

  

CAPTION Daniel Huntington (American, 1816-1906). Ellen Almira Low and Her Three Children, 1847. Oil on canvas, 64 x 53 15/16 in. (162.5 x 137 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. William Raymond 

 FREDERICK PRIME married Mary Rutherford JAY

Artist:  Daniel Huntington  1816-1906

Sitter: Frederick Prime  oil on canvas. At the Jay Homestead in Bedford, NY

Frederick I. Prime, a Son of Nathaniel Prime and Owner of Edgewood Frederick I. Prime attended Yale, studied law and was admitted to the bar of the State of New York as a young man. He married his first wife, Mary Rutherfurd Jay, and entered practice with her father, his new father-in-law, Peter A. Jay who served as Recorder of New York City. Frederick and Mary Prime had three children before Mary died on September 9, 1835. (She is buried in the Jay Graveyard in Rye, New York.) Their children were Mary Rutherford Prime, born in New York on August 24, 1830; Harriet Prime, born in New York on September 11, 1832; and Helen Jay Prime, born in New York on August 22, 1835. Frederick Prime’s wife, Mary Prime, died only eighteen days after the couple’s third child was born.

 

MRS JOHN JAY, II (Eleanor Field) married JOHN JAY, II

Artist:  Daniel Huntington, 1816-1906

Sitter: Mrs John Jay, II wife of JJ II, oil on canvas,  hangs at the Jay Homestead in Bedford.

  

Eleanor Kingsland Field was the daughter of Hickson Field, of New York. She married John Jay II in 1837. The miniature she wears on the bracelet on her left arm is said to be that of her son, William Jay (1841-1915).
bio: John Jay II was a man of several occupations including diplomat, abolitionist, farmer, lawyer and public service. He was a member of the Jay family, one of the most prominent in New York State and American history. John was very devoted to many causes along with having a strong moral compass, great integrity and a gentle persona. He was born in 1817. John was the third of eight children born to William and August McVickar Jay and a grandson of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. He was raised with five sisters while another brother and sister died very young and enjoyed a childhood of privilege and happiness. As his father and grandfather before him, John also received a classical education in the highest tradition. When John was fifteen, he began studies at Columbia College in New York City and ranked second in the class of 1836. He began legal studies in New York City after graduation and entered the bar in 1839. John practiced law for the next nineteen years until his father’s death in 1858. After retiring from his law practice, he pursued his favorite causes and ran the family businesses. John provided a life of comfort and ease for his family. He married Eleanor Kingsland Field, a strong willed woman, in June 1837 at the Jay home in Bedford, New York. They enjoyed 57 years of marriagealong with a “Jaybilee,” a celebration of their fiftieth wedding anniversary.

CONSTANCE FIELDER BRUEN

Artist: Daniel Huntington.  1816-1906

Sitter: Mrs Alexander Jay BRUEN,  oil on canvas.


The testatrix gives her family sliver and portraits to her children which includes a portrait of herself bv Huntington, the_ Jay„ silver, aqd “the”port rait of her father and mother. WHHam Jay and Augusta J

Yale obit: Yale obit

jsdubois28added this on 20 Jul 2013 

Alexander Jay Bruen, B.A. 1878. Born August 10,1855, in Newport, R.I. Died February 25, 1937, in New York City. Father, Alexander McWhorter Bruen (B.A. Rutgers 1836; M.D. Columbia 1836); son of Mathias and Hannah (Coe) Bruen. Mother, Louisa (Jay) Bruen; daughter of William Jay (B.A. 1807) and Hannah Augusta (McVickar) Jay. Yale relatives include: Peter A. Jay, hon- orary M.A. 1798 /(fflgtt«ncle); W. Livingston Bruen, ’79 (brother); Attended scho||WHH|^Hwk City, Paris and Nice, France, and Dresden, Germarrj^jpS^wHoquy appointment Senior year; mem- ber Dunham Boat Club, Gamma Nu, and Linonia.« Attended Columbia Law School («r-i88o); practiced law independ- ently m New York City until retirement in 1927; author: Our Charities and Bow ‘They are Managed; member St. James Presbyterian Church, New York City. Married June 19, 1907, in Little Silver, N.J., Constance Louise; daughter of Edward Charles and Eliza Winthrop (Carville) Fiedler. Children: Alexander Jay, Jr., ’32; Edward Fiedler Livingston; Con- stance Louisa Jay Fiedler; and Evelyn Louisa. Mrs. Bruen died Novem- ber 25> l93S- Death due to pneumonia. Buried in Jay Cemetery, Rye, N.Y. Sur- vived by children.

WILLIAM JAY

nArtist: Daniel Huntington (1816 – 1906), Comment: Original painting in the collection of John Jay Homestead, Katonah, Westchester, New York, USA

  
He was born in New York City, and graduated from Yale in 1808. After his graduation, he took up the management of his father’s large estate in Westchester County, New York, and also studied law at Albany. Poor eyesight soon compelled him to give up the legal profession. He early became interested in various philanthropic enterprises and reforms and identified himself especially with the temperance, antislavery, and antiwar movements. He was one of the founders (in 1816) of the American Bible Society, which he defended against the vigorous attacks of the High Church party, led by Bishop Hobart. He was judge of common pleas in New York from 1818 to 1820, and was first judge of Westchester County from 1820 to 1842, when he was removed on account of his antislavery views.

BRUEN geneaology

BRUEN genealogy.

Descendants of WILLIAM JAY and HANNAH McVICKER 


WILLIAM JAY: Third Generation PJ-JJ-WJ


“(Wiki bio)He was born in New York City, and graduated from Yale in 1808. After his graduation, he took up the management of his father’s large estate in Westchester County, New York, and also studied law at Albany. Poor eyesight soon compelled him to give up the legal profession. He early became interested in various philanthropic enterprises and reforms and identified himself especially with the temperance, antislavery, and antiwar movements. He was one of the founders (in 1816) of the American Bible Society, which he defended against the vigorous attacks of the High Church party, led by Bishop Hobart. He was judge of common pleas in New York from 1818 to 1820, and was first judge of Westchester County from 1820 to 1842, when he was removed on account of his antislavery views.

An enthusiastic member of the American Antislavery Society, whose constitution he drafted, Jay stood with Birney at the head of the conservative abolitionists, and by his calm, logical, and judicial writings exerted for many years a powerful influence. From 1835 to 1837 he was the society’s corresponding foreign secretary. In 1840, however, when the society began to advocate measures which he deemed too radical, he withdrew his membership, but with his pen he continued his labor on behalf of the slave, urging emancipation in the District of Columbia and the exclusion of slavery from the territories, though deprecating any attempt to interfere with slavery in the states. He was also a proponent of antiwar theories and was for many years president of the Peace Society. His pamphlet War and Peace: the Evils of the First with a Plan for Securing the Last, advocating international arbitration, was published by the English Peace Society in 1842, and is said to have contributed to the promulgation, by the powers signing the Treaty of Paris in 1856, of a protocol expressing the wish that nations, before resorting to arms, should have recourse to the good offices of a friendly power.

Jay was married with 8 children, all but 2 survived to adulthood. These included the lawyer John Jay (1817-1894), Anna Jay Balch, Maria Jay Butterworth, Sarah Louisa Jay Bruen and Augusta Jay Pellew.[citation needed]”


Fourth Generation: SARAH LOUISA JAY(1819-1905)married ALEXANDER McVICKER BRUEN(1803-1886) 

Sarah Louisa Jay was the fourth child and third female descendant of William and Hannah Jay. She was brought up in Bedford. In 1840 at age 21 she married Alexander Bruen and after time in New York moved to Scarsdale. They had three children. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery in Rye.

“The old mansion, which has long since disappeared, was constructed in the French chateau style, and commanded splendid views of the surrounding country. The property, after Mr. Cooper’s death, was sold by Mr. Cooper’s children to Alexander McWhorter Bruen, M.D., who married Sarah Louisa Jay, third daughter of the Hon. William Jay, of Bedford. The Bruens descend from a family of that name, formerly seated at Bruen, Stapleford, Cheshire, England. Robert Le Bruen, of that place, in 12 30, was the ancestor of the celebrated John Bruen, Esquire,5 of Bruen, Stapleford, who was born in 1560, and died 162 5. His son, Obadiah Bruen, was entered a freeman of Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1640, Before 1650, he was chosen seven times deputy to the General Court, from Gloucester. From the latter place he removed to New London. In the charter of Connecticut, granted by Charles II., his name appears as one of the patentees of the Colony. From New London he removed in 1667, with his son John to Milford (now the city of Newark, New Jersey). John, his son, left Eleazer the father of Eleazer the grandfather of Matthias Bruen, Esq., father of the present Alexander M. Bruen, M.D., of Scarsdale.”

MRS. ALEXANDER M. BRUEN PASSES QUIETLY AWAY.   (obit)Louisa Jay Bruen, widow of Dr. Alexander M Bruen, died at her home on Mamaroneck Road on Sun November 6th, aged ninety. The funeral which was held In the , Constable Memorial Church at Mamaroneck, two o’clock yesterday afternoon. Interment was made in the Jay family burial ground on the Jay Estate at Rye, where her husband also Is buried. Mrs. Bruen’s husband, Dr. Alexander M. Bruen, who was well known In New York and Washington, died In 1886. She was a sister of the late John Jay and a granddaughter of Chief Justice John Jay. Besides a sister, Mrs. Henry E. Pettew of , Washington, she leaves three children, Alexander Jay Bruen, William’ Livingston Bruen and Mrs. Ide, wife of Rear Admiral George E. Ide, retired. She was an aunt of Colonel William jay and Mrae. von Schwelnltz, wife of General von Schweinitf, formerly German Ambassador to Austria. . Mrs. Bruen’s father. Judge William Jay, whose home was at Bedford, N. Y., was an eminent jurist, author and philanthropist. Her mother was Miss Augusta McVicker daughter of John McVicker, of Bedford.” Dr. Bruen bought the property on the Mamaroneck Road about the time of their marriage. The house in which JF Cooper lived when he wrote the Spy, was then on the site of the present house which Dr. Bruen built, and which has been 4he family home ever since. Dr. and Mrs. Bruen at one time spent a large part of their time in Washington, D. C. A few years ago Mrs. Bruen established a home for old people and children, and gave them the use of the Washington house. This benevolence she has since maintained. About two years ago Mrs. Bruen suffered a stroke of paralysis which affected the eyelids so that she could not keep them open, rendering her practically blind. In spite of her age she Was in the habit of walking and driving about a great deal, until a month ago, when she became unable to leave the house. She was not, however, kept abed and was , drinking her coffee Sunday morning, when she died. The family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends, in their bereavement —(Scarsdale Inquirer Nov 1905)

Fifth Generation: Children of LOUISA JAY and ALEXANDER McVICKER BRUEN 

1. ALEXANDRA LOUISA BRUEN married Rear Admiral GEORGE ELMORE IDE 

2. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN married CONSTANCE FIELDER

3. LIVINGSTON BRUEN married ELIZABETH ARCHER

      1. ALEXANDRA LOUISA BRUEN
Fifth Generation: Alexandra Louisa Bruen, born 1848. Died 1938. Married George Elmore IDE. They had one child. Both were buried in the Jay Cemetery.

Bio: IDE, George Elmore: Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy; born in Zanesville, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1845; son of Dr. William E. and Angelina (Sullivan) Ide. He was appointed to the U. S. Naval Academy in 1861, and graduated in 1865. In the summer of 1862 and 1864, while midshipman, cruised after Confederate steamers Tallahassee and Florida; in 1870, went to Greenland on Juniata in search of Polaris survivors, and same year took Virginius filibusters from Santiago, Cuba, to New York. Served on various ships, including the Kenosha, which, in 1871, escorted English battleship Monrach to Portland, Me., carrying remains of George Peabody, philanthropist; commanded steamer Justin off Santiago, during Spanish War; took United States steamer Yosemite to Guam, 1899, carrying governor of island and surveying the harbor, in view of making it a cable and coaling station in 1900; commanded United States steamship New Orleans, on Manila Station; thence to Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, as captain of yard until retired as rear-admiral, Sept. 26, 1901, after forty years’ service. RearAdmiral Ide is a member of the Metropolitan, City, New York Athletic and New York Yacht Clubs of New York City. He married at Fortress Monroe, Va., July 28, 1889, Alexandra Louise Bruen. Address: 1128 Madison Avenue, New York City.

Sixth Generation: Children of ALEXANDRA LOUISA BRUEN and GEORGE ELMORE IDE

      1. JOHN JAY IDE married DORA BROWNING DONNER

Sixth Generation. John Jay IDE Birth 26 Jun 1890 in Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island Death 01 Dec 1962 marriage at age 53 to Dora Browning DONNER Birth 18 Oct 1916 in Pennsylvania Death 18 Dec 1998 in San Francisco. They had no children.

Obit: Most people have never heard of John Jay Ide (Jun. 20, 1892-Jan. 12, 1962), who was an international aviation pioneer and European representative for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Born at Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island, he was the son of Rear Admiral George E. Ide of the U.S. Navy, and Alexandra Bruen Ide. Ide was the great-grandson of John Jay, early national diplomat and first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

John Ide attended the Browning School in New York City, and upon graduation from Columbia University in 1913 he received a certificate in architecture. He then studied architecture at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris for the next year before returning to New York to work as an architect. When the United States entered World War in 1917, Ide enlisted in the Naval Reserve Flying Corp and rose to the rank of lieutenant. He also took the opportunity to court and marry Dora Browning Donner of Philadelphia, the daughter of philanthropist and steel financier William Henry Donner when he was 53. With war clouds gathering around the world, in 1940 the U.S. Navy recalled Ide to active duty, commissioning him as a lieutenant commander and placing him in command of the Foreign Intelligence Branch of the Bureau of Aeronautics in Washington. He served in that post until 1943, when the Federal government appointed him a Tactical Air Intelligence Officer in Europe. In this capacity Ide helped to survey at the conclusion of the war in Europe the aeronautical capabilities of the defeated Nazi Germany. Although mustered out of active military duty with the rank of Navy Captain in late 1945, Ide remained in Europe as representative for the NACA for the next five years. There he continued the work he had undertaken in 1921 as a representative for the organization as a conduit for technical information about the development of aviation technology on the continent. He retired from that position in 1950.

John Ide returned to the United States soon after retirement from the NACA, residing in New York City. He was socially prominent in that city, as well as in Washington, D.C., and Palm Beach, Florida. He served in a variety of honorary positions during this period, vice president of the International Aeronautic Federation, president of the International Sporting Commission, board member of the National Aeronautic Association, trustee of the Museum of the City of New York, manager of the American Bible Society, and a vestryman of the St. Bartholomew’s Protestant Episcopal Church in New York.

Ide returned to France in 1958 to present a plaque to commemorate the site in Paris where John Jay participated in the signing of the peace treaty between Britain and the United States in 1783 that ended the American Revolution. He died at his Park Avenue home in New York City on Jan. 12, 1962, at age 69.

He wrote and published a book on the portraits of John Jay.

     2. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN

Fifth Generation. Alexander Jay BRUEN+ Birth abt 1855 in Newport, Rhode Island. Death 25 FEB 1937 in New York, New York, married Constance FIEDLER+ Birth abt 1880 in New Jersey Death 1935 They had three children. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery.

(Yale obit) Alexander Jay Bruen, B.A. 1878. Born August 10,1855, in Newport, R.I. Died February 25, 1937, in New York City. Father, Alexander McWhorter Bruen (B.A. Rutgers 1836; M.D. Columbia 1836); son of Mathias and Hannah (Coe) Bruen. Mother, Louisa (Jay) Bruen; daughter of William Jay (B.A. 1807) and Hannah Augusta (McVickar) Jay. Yale relatives include: Peter A. Jay, honorary M.A. 1798, W. Livingston Bruen, ’79 (brother); He Attended school in, Paris and Nice, France, and Dresden, Germany. Appointment his Senior year; member Dunham Boat Club, Gamma Nu, and Linonia. Attended Columbia Law School («r-i88o); practiced law independ- ently New York City until retirement in 1927; author: Our Charities and How ‘They are Managed; member St. James Presbyterian Church, New York City. Married June 19, 1907, in Little Silver, N.J., Constance Louise Fiedler, daughter of Edward Charles and Eliza Winthrop (Carville) Fiedler. Children: Alexander Jay, Jr., ’32; Edward Livingston; Constance Louisa Jay ; and Evelyn Louisa. Mrs. Bruen died November 25> l93S- Death due to pneumonia. Buried in Jay Cemetery, Rye, N.Y. Survived by children.

Sixth Generation: CHILDREN OF ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN and CONSTANCE FIEDLER

1. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN, Jr married LORNA HARRAH

2. EDWARD LIVINGSTON BRUEN married MARIAN STUYVESANT GREY

3. EVELYN LOUISA BRUEN married JOHN BOND TREVOR

4. CONSTANCE LOUISA JAY BRUEN married DONALD F BARROW

     1. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN, Jr

1. Sixth Generation. Alexander Jay BRUEN+** Birth 16 Oct 1910 in New York City Death 20 Sep 1991 in Narragansett, Washington, Rhode iSland married Lorna HARRAH+ Birth 26 Jul 1923 in Rhode Island Death

Alexander Jay Bruen practiced Law at Sullivan and Cromwell. He was a Trustee and acted as treasurer of the Jay Cemetery in the 1960-1990’s. They had no children.

     2. EDWARD LIVINGSTON BRUEN

2. Sixth Generation. Edward Livingston BRUEN+* Birth 21 Feb 1913 in New York. Death 23 2004 in Oyster Bay, Nassau, New York, married Marian Natalie Stuyvesant GRAY+ Birth 2 Mar 1912 in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York Death 15 May 2000 in Oyster Bay, Nassau, New York, They are both buried in the Jay Cemetery. They had two children

“Judge Gray’s son, Albert Zabriskie Gray, married Marian Anthon Fish in 1907. They had a daughter, Marian Stuyvesant Gray, who married Edward Fiedler Livingston Bruen in 1942 and had two children: a son, Nicholas Livingston Bruen, who lives in New York, and a daughter, Dr. Marian Anthon Bruen, who married Dr. Charles Ainsworth Staveley Marrin in 1976. They live in Vermont, and have a daughter Minet Anthon Bruen Marrin, who is a Latin teacher. Nicholas, Marian, and Minet are also descendants of John Jay and Robert Livingston.”

     3. EVELYN LOUISA BRUEN

Sixth Generation. Evelyn Louisa BRUEN+* Birth 27 Dec 1914 in New City Death May 14, 2001 in Palm Beach, Florida, married John Bond TREVOR+ Jr Birth 4 JUL 1909 in New York, New York Death August 27, 2006 in Paul Smiths, Lake Saranac, Franklin, New York. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery. They had three children.

Evelyn Trevor was secretary of the Jay Cemetery for many years and meetings were held in their townhouse at 11 East 91st Street.

“When Andrew Carnegie purchased the expansive lot for his mansion across from Central Park in 1899, the neighborhood was still-sparsely developed. Broken rows of brownstone dwellings dotted the streets around East 90th and 91st Streets; but the great mansions of New York’s wealthiest citizens had, for the most part, not advanced beyond 70th Street. A block away from No. 15 East 90th was the mansion of John B. Trevor at No. 11 East 91st Street. Emily Trevor had grown up in that house and in 1926 she acquired the old brownstone at No. 15.

Emily Trevor was, perhaps, not so intrepid as to move to the far East Side; but she did follow suit in her choice of architects and design. Emily, also unmarried, had the old Lawrence house demolished and she commissioned Mott Schmidt to design an up-to-date mansion befitting the neighborhood. Mott created a charming three-and-a-half story neo-Federal home that would have been quite at home on Sutton Place. Clad in Flemish bond red brick, it was trimmed in contrasting white stone. The double entrance doors were sheltered by a refined Corinthian portico that supported an iron-railed balcony at the second floor. Emily moved into the new house in 1929 and in 1931, following his graduation from Columbia College, her bachelor brother John B. Trevor, Jr. joined her. When his engagement to Evelyn Louisa Bruen was announced seven years later, the match made headlines in the society pages.”

Obit: PALM BEACH Fla. Evelyn L. Bruen Trevor, 86, a resident of Palm Beach, Fla., died quietly at her home on May 14, 2001. She was born on Dec. 27, 1914, the fourth and youngest child of Alexander Jay Bruen and Constance Fiedler Bruen. She was a great-great-granddaughter of John Jay, the first chief justice of the United States. She attended the Nightingale School in New York City. She married John B. Trevor Jr. on Nov 18, 1938 in New York City.

Mrs. Trevor and her family were summer visitors to the St. Regis lakes for many years.

Survivors include her husband of 425 Worth Ave., Palm Beach. Fla.; her three children: John B Trevor III of Lake Placid. Alexander B. Trevor of Worthington, Ohio and Emily Trevor Van Vleck of Lyme, N.H.; nine grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren and her brother, Edward L. Bruen of Oyster Bay

     4. CONSTANCE LOUISA JAY BRUEN

Obit BARROW-Constance L.J.B., on 4 October 1997. Beloved wife of the late Donald F. Barrow. Mother of Elizabeth Doering and Constance Hurley. Grandmother of Elizabeth, Dennis and Lily. Sister of the late Alexander J. Bruen, Edward F.L. Bruen and Evelyn B. Trevor. Services on October 10 at 11 AM at St. John’s Church, Cold Spring Harbor. In lieu of flowers, donations to Animal Rescue and Rehabilitation, POB 61, Syosset, New York 11791.

 

 

 

FAMILY OF HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS and CATHARINE HELENA JAY

HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS married CATHARINE HELENA JAY

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Catharine Helena JAY’s Grandfather of course had been very much involved in the Colonies separation from England and the development of our Democracy. JOHN JAY had married Sarah LIVINGSTON, a daughter of the then Governor of New Jersey, William LIVINGSTON He was one of the early patriots and revolutionary founders of this country. During the Revolution he had been sent to Spain to try and negotiate support from the wealthy Spanish crown, then had gone to Paris to negotiate with Benjamin Franklin and Henry Laurens the peace treaty with the English, had return, been made Chief Justice of the new court by George Washington and then negotiated another unpopular treaty with England, and ended as Governor of New York and worked to pass the ratification of the new Constitution while Governor.

Their oldest son, Peter Augustus Jay, who married Mary Rutherfurd Clarkson, became a successful lawyer in New York City. They had eight children, four daughters of whom Catharine was the third. Peter Augustus Jay (January 24, 1776 – February 22, 1843) was the eldest son of New York’s only native Founding Father, John Jay. Peter was one of 6 children born to John Jay and Sarah Livingston Jay, and one of 2 boys (brother William was born in 1789) with 4 sisters: Susan (born and died in 1780); Maria (b. 1782), Ann (b. 1783) and Sarah Louisa (b. 1792)

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Peter Augustus Jay was born at “Liberty Hall,” in 1776, at the home of his grandparents’, the Livingstons, in Elizabethtown, New Jersey. Like his father, he graduated from King’s College, the precursor of Columbia University. Notably following his graduation in 1794, Peter Augustus acted as private secretary to his father in London for the Jay Treaty.[1] The young Jay studied law and established a practice in New York City with his cousin Peter Jay Munro, carrying on a family tradition of public service. He married Mary Rutherfurd Clarkson, daughter of General Matthew Clarkson, in 1807 [2 ][3 ] and they had 8 children. From 1812 – 1817, Peter Augustus Jay helped found the Bank for Savings (thereby contributing to the establishment of the New York State savings bank system). As a Federalist, he was a member from New York City of the New York State Assembly in 1816, during which time he was active in arranging the financing for the construction of the Erie Canal. He ran many times for Congress, but was always defeated by the Democratic-Republican candidates. From 1819 to 1821, he was Recorder of New York City. He was a delegate from Westchester Co. to the New York State Constitutional Convention of 1821. He helped found the New York Law Institute in 1828, which today is the oldest law library in New York City. Jay was President of New York Hospital (1827-1833), Chairman of the Board of Trustees, King’s College and President of the New York Historical Society (1840-1842). [4] For a time he was also a Westchester County Judge.[5]

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The Rye House: Under his father’s aegis, Peter Augustus installed European styled stone ha-has on the property and planted elm trees. His father John Jay died in 1829. In 1836, Peter Augustus contracted with a builder, Edwin Bishop, to take down the failing farmhouse that had been barraged by the British during the Revolutionary War. Reusing structural elements from “The Locusts” where his father grew up as a boy, Peter Augustus Jay helped create the Greek Revivalmansion that stands there today. Unfortunately his wife Mary would not live to see the house completed, as she died in Madeira on December 24, 1838. Peter Augustus Jay died in 1843 and the Rye house passed to his son, John Clarkson Jay.[8

Mary Rutherford CLARKSON’s father, Matthew Clarkson (October 17, 1758 – April 25, 1825) was an American Revolutionary War soldier and a politician in New York State. The town of Clarkson in Western New York was named after him. He was a great uncle of Thomas S. Clarkson, a member of the family who founded Clarkson University. Matthew Clarkson was born October 17, 1758 in New York to David and Elizabeth Clarkson. He was the great-great-grandson of Reverend David Clarkson (1622–1686), a notable Puritan clergyman in Yorkshire, England, whose sermons included “The Doctrine of Justification is Dangerously Corrupted by the Roman Church.” His great-grandfather was Matthew Clarkson who came to New York from England in 1690 as Secretary of the Province. He married Mary Rutherford on May 24, 1785, and Sarah Cornell on February 14, 1792. Clarkson died April 25, 1825.

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He served in the Revolutionary War, first on Long Island, subsequently under Benedict Arnold. He was at Saratoga and, later, on the staff of General Benjamin Lincoln, was present at the surrender of Burgoyne at Savannah (1779) and at the defense of Charleston (1780). He was also present at the surrender of Cornwallis. After the war, Clarkson was commissioned brigadier general of militia of Kings and Queens Counties in June 1786 and Major General of the Southern District of New York in March 1798. [edit]Political service When the war ended, Lincoln became Secretary of War and Clarkson became his assistant. He served as a member of the New York State Assembly for one term (1789–1790) and introduced a bill for the gradual abolition of slavery in the State. As a Regent of the University of the State of New York he was presented at the court of French King Louis XVI. He served as U.S. Marshal (1791–1792), State Senator 1794-1795, a member of the commission to build a new prison 1796-1797 and President of the New York (City) Hospital (1799). In 1802, Clarkson was the Federalist candidate for U.S. Senator from New York but was defeated by DeWitt Clinton. He was President of the Bank of New York from 1804 until his death in 1825. [edit]Town of Clarkson On April 2, 1819, the town of Clarkson was established by the New York State Legislature and named in honor of General Clarkson. Although there is no evidence that he ever lived in Western New York, he reportedly owned a sizable amount of land there, and he gave 100 acres (405,000 m²) to the town.

Children of Henry Augustus Du BOIS and Catharine Helena JAY
1. Col. Cornelius Jay DuBois, M.D., b. N. Y. City, Aug. 31, 1836; d. New Haven, Conn., Feb. 11, 1880
2. Peter A. Jay DuBois, b. Madiera, Spain Feb. 23, 1839; d. June 3, 1839. 3430.
3. Major Henry A. DuBois, Jr., M.D., b NY City. June 26, 1840; m. Emily M. Blois. He was Surgeon in regular army, and served in Civil War. They had 4 children.
4. John Jay Dubois, b.Newton Falls, June 6, 1846; d. Nov. 11, 1898. 3432.
5. Augustus Jay DuBois, b. Newton Falls Apr. 22, 1849; m. Adeline Blakeslee.
6. Alfred Wagstaff Dubois, b. Newton Falls Dec. 30, 1852. d. 17 May 1900 m Anna M Lictenberg
7. Mary Rutherford Dubois, b.NY City May 22, 1854. d Nov 6, 1919
8. Robert Ogden Dubois, b New Haven CT Jan. 19, 1860; d. Mar. 9, 1895; m. ■, Alice Mason. They had three children

CORNELIUS JAY Du BOIS

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Col. Cornelius Jay DuBois, M.D., b. N. Y. City, Aug. 31, 1836; d. New Haven, Conn., Feb. 11, 1880. Grad. Columbia Law School in 1861; on outbreak of Civil War went to Washington with 7th Reg1t; recruited Co. D. 27th Conn. Vols, at New Haven and was made Capt.; served under Gen. Hancock in Zooks1s Brigade at Aquia Creek, Falmouth, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville; was severely wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; rescued by brother, Dr. Henry A. DuBois3430, Ass1t Surgeon reg. army, but never fully recovered from wound; Gen. Hancock testified to his father there was never a more gallant charge, and Col. Brook said there never was a more gallant soldier in the army than Capt. DuBois. After partial recovery he became Adjutant of 20th Conn. Vols., and served under Hooker and Sherman in Georgia; in battle of Resaca, he seized colors from wounded bearer and planted them on summit of enemy1s position; brevetted Major by Pres. U. S. for bravery at Gettysburg, and Lieut. Col. for gallantry at Resaca; July, 1866, received degree of M.D. at Yale Medical College, and went abroad for health; on return spent balance of life at New Haven, bearing his sufferings with the same courage displayed in military action.

HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS married EMILY M BLOIS

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Their second son, Henry after the CivilWar, served with Indian Service in New Mexico. He moved to Mann County in California about 1868. Two of his brothers lived with him for a time. He was married to Emily Blois in 1880. They had four children .

BioYale: . Henry Augustus DuBois, M.D., b. at the residence of his g. f. DuBois, n. w. cor. Broadway and 8th street, June 26, 1840 ; Yale B.P., 1859; April 25, 1861, he joined the 12th Regiment of N.Y.S.N.G. as Hospital Steward, in a few weeks was examined for Asst. Surgeon, U.S.A., and passed No. 3 out of 40 applicants; Aug. 28, 186 1, was under Dr. Abadie in the Columbian Hospital, Washington, but was soon put in full charge. He served in the 6th U. S. Cavalry as Inspector of Cavalry ; May, 1862, Asst, Med. Director of the Army of the Potomac, subsequently Medical In-spector of the Artillery Reserve under Gen. Hunt ; was at the H of Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, etc., in all about 40 battles ; 1864, Inspector of Hospitals at headquarters of the Army of the Potomac ; in June, 1864, on Gen. Sheridan’s staff; Aug., 1864, appointed Asst. Med. Director of the Middle MilitaryDivision of Va., on Sheridan’s staff, and was with him in all his battles, and present at Lee’s surrender ; brevetted by the President Captain, and subsequently Brevet Major. In 1865, took charge of the U. S. Laboratory in Phil. ; May, 1866, sent to Fort Union, New Mexico ; resigned Feb. 21, 1868, and is now practising medicine in San Rafael, Cal., where he has founded a cemetery (Temaulpas), of which he is Comptroller ; delivered in Yale Medical Coll., April, i860, a course of lectures on Toxicology. Confirmed by Bishop Williams, in St. Paul’s, New Haven; m. in 5th Avenue Church, by Rev. John Hall, D.D., Dec. i, 1880, Emily, dau. of Hannah MariaFerris (dau. of Miss Schieffelin, who was dau. of Hannah Lawrence and Schieffelin), and Samuel Blois, M.D. i child.

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The following article was written by Marilyn L Geary and published in the SanRafael paper. “DR Henry Augustus DuBois, Jr. settled in San Rafael in 1869 after serving as a surgeon in the Civil War and in the Indian Wars of New Mexico. Born to a wealthy East Coast family, Yale-educated Dr. DuBois was a great-grandson of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a president of the Continental Congress. In his memoirs, William Kent described DuBois as “a New Englander and a straight-laced and proper citizen. He was educated, skillful and much esteemed.” Chickahominy Fever Dr. DuBois may have been lured to San Rafael by its healthy climate. In the California Medical Society’s journal, Dr. DuBois recommended San Rafael as ideal for a “sanitarium for chronic diseases.” During the Civil War, DuBois had contracted Chickahominy fever, a camp fever with symptoms of typhoid and malaria named for the mosquito-ridden swamps of the Chickahominy River in Virginia. The 1870 Census shows Dr. DuBois residing with 40-year-old Dr. Alfred Taliaferro, the first physician to practice in Marin. They lived in San Rafael Village with a 23-year old Chinese servant named Ah Poy. Dr. DuBois subsequently purchased land west of San Rafael at the end of today’s Fifth Street in what was called Forbes Valley. His land was far removed from town and included a section of Red Hill. Burials Prohibited When Dr. DuBois arrived in San Rafael, the town was growing fast, and the cemetery at St. Paul’s Episcopal Churchyard, Fourth and E Streets, could not keep up. In 1876, two years after San Rafael incorporated, town trustee Dr. Taliaferro proposed and got passed an ordinance prohibiting burials within San Rafael’s town limits. On Sept. 14, 1876, theMarin County Journal reported on a town meeting held to determine where to locate a new cemetery: “Nearly all the money and land kings were present.” Among several bids, Dr. DuBois offered a portion of his ranch for $13,000. The town trustees took no action, and the law to prohibit burials in town limits was rescinded. It was deemed “better to double up in the old yard than keep the dead above ground.” A Committee of One Not one to dawdle, by June 1878 Dr. DuBois had 40 men working on 113 acres of his land to build the new cemetery. He later stated, “I organized myself a committee of one.” He put enormous funds and energies into the venture, planting myrtle and ivy by the wagonload, laying out miles of roadways, setting out 2,000 trees and thousands of flowers. In September the Marin Journal reported that Dr. DuBois was doing a great amount of work. Schooners came up San Rafael Creek to First and C streets with loads of urns, fountains, sample monuments, granite walls and fences. DuBois had drawn up plans for a bell tower and an artesian well 2,000 feet deep. In December 1879 the Marin Journal reported that Dr. DuBois had toured 42 cemeteries in the East to collect drawings, photos, maps, statistics on water supply and other cemetery best practices. DuBois’ Folly In the late 1800s cemeteries were designed as parks for picnics and Sunday outings. DuBois expected that the cemetery would be a favorite destination and built miles of access roads. As he owned a portion of Red Hill, he hired Chinese laborers to build a zig-zag road up its heights to provide access from San Anselmo. Too steep for horse and buggy, the project gained the label “.” The Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery was dedicated in August 1879. It eventually served some of San Rafael’s most prominent families, including the Dollars and the Boyds. DuBois’ horizons, however, stretched beyond Marin. In January 1880 Dr. DuBois wrote in the Marin County Journal: “It is believed that, with the example of New York City, many burials from San Francisco will take place here…Objections [are] that San Francisco funerals must come on the boat and pass through town, but the midday, little-used boat will be used and funerals can pass on streets with few houses. Friends prophesy I will be ruined…I have been ruined so frequently – at least my friends have so prophesied – that I don’t mind it a bit.” Dr. DuBois built a number of artificial lakes at the cemetery. In 1881, reporting that the carp had multiplied from 11 to over 750, he suggested, “Carp raising would be a good industry here.”San Rafael in Denver? In 1874 Dr. DuBois platted a development in Denver, Colorado, which he named San Rafael for his California home. He expanded this subdivision in 1882 and 1886 as demand increased for more lots.The area, located 8 blocks northeast of downtown Denver, is now a heritage district on the National Register of Historic Places. An early advertisement described it as “beautifully located overlooking the city with a glorious view of the mountains.” Despite his activities in Denver, DuBois remained in San Rafael, Calif., where two of his siblings joined him. In 1880 he lived with his brother Alfred W. DuBois, a 28-year old Chinese servant Ah Jim and a 44-year-old servant Amelia Schuthris. Later that year, Dr. DuBois married Emily M. Blois, and they subsequently had four children. The Vaccine Farm : Building a cemetery, a residential neighborhood in a distant city, and a new family is more than enough to manage, but Dr. DuBois saw problems as opportunities. In the 1880s, vaccine panics often accompanied smallpox epidemics. Summer heat precluded transporting fresh vaccine from the East, and vaccine became scarce. The Pacific Coast Vaccine Farm didn’t last. Dr. DuBois died May 27, 1897 at age 55 of the typhoid fever he contracted in the Virginia swamps. Du Bois Street in San Rafael is named for another DuBois, but Dr. Henry A. DuBois Jr.’s legacy lives on in Mt. Tamalpais Cemetery and in Denver’s historic San Rafael district.”

JOHN JAY Du BOIS

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John Jay Du BOIS was a lawyer and lived part of his life in San Rafael, California with his brother Henry. He was unmarried

AUGUSTUS JAY Du BOIS married Adeline BLAKESLEE

Augustus Jay Du BOIS married Adeline Blakeslee and lived in New Haven. He was the Professor of Civil Engineering at the Sheffield School of Engineering, part of Yale University. They had no children.

ALFRED WAGSTAFF DuBOIS married ANNA LICHTENBERG

Alfred Wagstaff Du BOIS married Anna Lichtenberg. He lived for a period with his brother Henry in California. He died in Paris of a “hemorrhage” at age 47.  Aunt ANNA continued to live in San Francisco.

MARY RUTHERFURD Du BOIS

Mary Rutherfurd Du BOIS was unmarried and lived and died in New Haven.

ROBERT OGDEN Du Bois married ALICE MASON

The youngest child, Robert Ogden Du BOIS was born in new Haven in 1860 the time of the Civil War. He went to Yale and then Yale Medical School. He then moved to New York City and opened a medical practice specializing in ENT problems. In 1889 he married Alice Mason, the daughter of Rev Arthur Mason and from the family of Jonathan Mason from Boston. They had three children, Arthur, Helen and Robert. Unfortunately he had Rhumatic Fever as a child, developed heart disease and died of congestive heart failure when he was 36. His wife Alice died soon after. Their three children were brought up by their Mason Uncle, called Boompa!

Her father, Arthur Mason was born in Boston in 1837. He graduated from Trinity College. He studied in Geneva and returned to enter Berkley Divinity School in Middleton, Ct. He married Amelia Caroline Taylor, He was Rector of a number of churches in Mass, New Haven and New York City. He died at his home in New York City in 1907 and was buried in the Woodlawn Cemetery.

Her mother, Amelia Caroline Taylor was born in Cuba. Her father was a successful sugar Merchant there. He lived in Cuba until 1848 when they returned to Baltimore, Md. His father had also been active in sugar trade with Cuba and had been active in Baltimore political life. He was involved in the War of 1812. He also was one of the managers of a statue erected to honor George Washington in Baltimore

The couple had four children, a son and four daughters. Alexander T Mason, the oldest, became active in NY Politics and was the Republican Leader of the 29th Assembly District. The oldest daughter, Isabella married Mansel Van Rensselaer and they had four children, Bernard, Arthur, Maud and Alexander. The next oldest daughter, Alice married Robert Ogden Du Bois and they had three children, Arthur, Helen and Robert, The youngest daughters, ”Maud and Teddy” never married

Her grandfather, Jonathan Mason, Jr., of Boston, was a portrait and figure painter, student of Gilbert Stuart, friend or acquaintance of virtually every major American artist of the nineteenth century. His father Jonathan died in 1831. He himself was married to Isabella Weyman in Italy in 1834. The sculptor Horatio Greenough was one of the witnesses. They had six children: sons Charles, Arthur, Herbert, and Philip, and two daughters, Isabelle (who married Charles Hook Appleton) and another who married William Sturgis Hooper. Arthur became an ordained minister. Herbert and Philip served in the Union army during the Civil War; Philip died from wounds in July 1864 and was interred atMount Auburn Cemetery.

Her Great Grandfather was Senator Jonathen Mason who was born in Boston and graduated from Boston Latin School and Princeton University. He studied law and was admitted to the Mass bar in 1779. He served in the Mass House of Representatives and in the Senate from 1786 to 1800. In 1800 he was elected to the United States Senate where he served from 1800 to 1803. He then returned to the Mass Senate and returned to Washington as a member of the House from 1817 to 1820. He married Susannah Powell whose family had immigrated from Wales and were early settlers of Vermont. Senator Mason was a friend of Gilbert Stuart and urged him to move to Boston. Portraits of them done by Stuart hung in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston

The oldest son, my father, Arthur Mason Du BOIS, Birth Nov 4, 1890 in New York Death Dec 1979 in New York married my mother, MARIE LOUISE DIXON+*Birth 15 Dec 1895 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, Death 03 JUL 1943 in Hewlett, Nassau, New York, They had two children. Both are buried in the Jay Cemetery. Married Cornelia Prime COSTER Birth 6 Feb 1901 in New York, New York, Death 11 Dec 1956 in New York,

M. LOUISE Dixon Du BOIS was active in the formation of the New York Junior League. She had an active interest in history and documented the genealogy of my ancestors. This is kept at the Jay Homestead in Rye and as part of their exhibition.

The Jay Cemetery: History of Trustees

History of The Jay Cemetery

The Jay Cemetery was established by John Jay in 1805. Before this family members, which included his wife Sarah Livingston Jay, were buried in a family vault, situated in the Orchard of Peter Stuyvesant, next to St Marks in the Bowerie on 10th St. and Second Ave. Several changes were happening in New York at this time. The new grid system organizing the City into Avenues and Streets meant the Orchard Burial site was to become 10th St. There was a need to remove the family vaults and this was obviously a reason the Jay Vault was moved to Rye in 1807. The decision to place the Cemetery in the East Meadow had been made in 1805, when the youngest son of John Jay’s daughter Maria died and was the first to be buried on the Rye Estate.
Why did the orchard of Peter Stuyvesant in the Bowery become the site for the family vault? I believe it goes back to the wife of Augustus Jay, the first Jay to settle in this country, Anna Maria Bayard. Her paternal grandmother was Anna Stuyvesant Bayard, the sister of Peter Stuyvesant, who had come to New Amsterdam as a widow with her four children to help her brother. She was buried with her brother in what now is St Marks on the Bowerie at 11th St. Burial of Augustus and Anna Maria was probably the start of the Jay Family vault
In 1815 John Jay, on inheriting the Rye property, set aside as a family cemetery the lot where the burials had occurred and named his eldest son Peter Augustus Jay and nephew Peter Jay Munro as Trustees. He stated that any descendant of his father Peter Jay was eligible for burial. (Also husbands, wives, and widows of such descendants)
Peter Jay Munro  died in 1833 and Peter Augustus Jay died in 1843. From 1843 to 1891 John Clarkson Jay became the owner of the property and, in trust, of the Cemetery as well. It was managed by him during this period. At the time of his death the property was inherited by his heirs and his son also John Clarkson Jay was involved with its upkeep. When the property was sold in 1905 it was necessary to formalize ownership of the Cemetery and a right of way from the Post Road to it. In 1906, The Jay Cemetery, incorporated under the laws of New York State, was started which was to be held and maintained by three trustees. The trustees designated were:

John Clarkson Jay II, the son of John Clarkson Jay to continue as President until his retirement  in 1920.

Banyer Clarkson, the son of Susan Matilda Jay who married Matthew Clarkson until his retirement in 1928.

John Jay, the youngest son of Rev Peter Augustus Jay who served until his death in 1928.

They all were involved with the incorporation, early financial planning and maintenance of the Cemetery.
At the time of their retirements new trustees were needed.
John Clarkson Jay III was named trustee in 1920 to replace his father. He served as Treasurer and was involved with increasing the endowment of the Cemetery until 1935.

DeLancey Kane Jay, the son of Augustus Jay replaced Banyer Clarkson in 1928. He served as secretary and was interested in the upkeep of the Cemetery. He also served until 1935.

Pierre Jay was named trustee after the death of his younger brother John Jay also in 1928. He served as treasurer after 1935 and continued as Trustee until 1945.

In 1935 new Trustees to replace John Clarkson Jay III and DeLancey Kane Jay were needed. John Clarkson Jay’s son also John Clarkson Jay IV replaced his father on the Board. The oldest son of Delancy Kane Jay was Peter Jay who became the third Trustee.
In 1938 World War II was brewing and both JCJ and PAJ were called to serve. In response to this in the early 1940’s it was decided to enlarge the number of Vice Presidents and appoint officers who were not Trustees. Also at this time it seemed necessary to enlarge the size of the Cemetery.
Pierre Jay would continue as Trustee until 1945.. His  sister Mary Rutherfurd  Jay had assumed a much more active role with the cemetery.  Starting in 1936, she prepared a genealogy table of the descendants of Peter Jay. One of these is on permanent exhibit in the Jay Heritage Center. Mary Rutherfurd  was appointed President about 1938 and became a trustee on the retirement of her brother in 1945. (Appointed Vice President was Sarah Jay Hughes and Elizabeth Jay Etnier, who served as interim Trustees during the War.)
Mary Rutherfurd  as president, took on three tasks. The first was to develop a genealogy of the family to include all related to John Jay’s father Peter Jay. This she completed in 1936. The second was to purchase property from the owners of the property, Mr and Mrs Walter Devereau, to enlarge the cemetery to its maximum of 2.85 acres. This took over two years to do, but in 1946 the purchase with approvals was completed. The third was to write and publish a book for the family on The Jay Cemetery. This was done in 1947.
She was also involved with her brother Pierre in increasing the endowment of the cemetery and raising funds for its enlargement. In 1947 the value of the Cemetery endowment fund was about $55,000. This was managed by the firm Pierre Jay had started now Fiduciary Trust.
By 1948 several other Vice Presidents had been appointed which included Dr Robert Ogden Du Bois, Elizabeth Jay Etnier, Alexander Duer Harvey, Rev William Dudley Hughes, Mrs Peter Augustus Jay, Seth Low Pierrepont, John Jay Ide, and Chauncey Devereux Stillman. Alexander Jay Bruen was appointed Treasurer and his sister Evelyn Bruen Trevor was made secretary.
In 1948, a new cemetery trustee and new officers were needed. Pierre Jay died in 1949 and Mary Rutherfurd  Jay wished to retire. At this time the two trustees were John Clarkson Jay IV and Peter Jay who had returned from the War. Alexander Jay Bruen who was serving as treasurer was appointed Trustee and he continued as treasurer of the Cemetery. Other officers were appointed. My Uncle, Dr. Robert Ogden Du Bois took over Mary Rutherfurds  role as president. He served as President until 1970, when I, his nephew was appointed. Evelyn Bruen Trevor became secretary. It was in her house, 15 East 90th Street, that all the annual meetings were held while she was secretary.
Under Alexander Jay Bruen guidance the legal framework of the Cemetery was strengthened and family sections for burial were defined. Increase in the Cemetery endowment came with his guidance. The Cemetery continued to use Fiduciary Trust for its investments.
The trustees at this time (1980) were:
Peter A Jay

John Clarkson Jay

Alexander Jay Bruen, Treasurer.

Officers
John Jay Du Bois, President

Evelyn Bruen Trevor, Secretary

With the retirement of the three trustees about 1980 a fourth group of trustees was needed.

John Jay Du Bois who became President when his Uncle retired in 1970 was appointed a Trustee.

Nicholas Jay Bruen was appointed Trustee and Treasurer to replace his Uncle.

Sybil Jay Baldwin was appointed Trustee and Secretary when her uncle Peter Jay retired.

Several Vice Presidents were also appointed that included Peter Jay, Charles Doane, Anne Patten Miliken, Edward Livingston Bruen,
This again was a period of property change. In 1965, the house and property owned by the Mr and Mrs Devereux since 1910 was to be sold. Very careful division of the land was planed by them. The bottom acreage was to be given to the County of Westchester to use for a Park. A side portion was to be sold in lots for housing to give tax revenue to the City of Rye. The Peter Augustus Jay House and surrounding property were to be given to the Methodist Church.
The upper portion of land including the Greek Revival house built by Peter Augustus Jay that had been given to the Methodist Church was found to be impossible for them to maintain. This was put on the market and in 1983 was bought for Real Estate development. This started a long process spear headed by “The Jay Coalition”. The Jay Cemetery supported the effort to restore the PAJ house and preserve the property around it. President John Jay Du Bois and his wife Sharon were active with others in the Jay Coalition. This was successful but was not finalized until 1990. At this time the house has been restored and is being successfully run as the Jay Heritage Center.
In 1990 there was another need for a change in Trustees. John Jay Du Bois retired as President and became a trustee ex officio. Nicholas Jay Bruen who had served as Trustee and with Fiduciary Trust had managed the Cemetery endowment retired with health issues. Sybil Jay Baldwin also retired as Secretary.
New Trustees were needed.

Dr Theodora Budnick was named President,

Houston Huffman, Treasurer

Peter A Jay.
Vice Presidents include Charles Doane, Susan Lodge, John Trevor IV, Sandy Trevor and Tielman Van Vieck.

This group continud to manage the Cemeter from 1990 to 2017.  During this time the maintainance of the cemetery was of primary importance.  The endowment fund under Huston Huffman watch continued to grow. Cleaning of the stones and need for stone maintainance became an issue. The stone of John Jay and the flat stone marking the family burial plot from New York were cleaned. In 2016 it was decided to increase the number of Trustees from 3 to 5.  Huston Huffman wished to resign as a trustee but agreed to stay as treasurer. Joining Dr Theodora Budnick and Peter Jay as trustee were Peter Doane, Charlie Doane and Susan Lodge.  Sarah Huffman who had acted as secretary wished to resign and Charlie Doane was appointed secretary.

In 2017 Dr Theodora Budnick retired as President. and a new group of trustees was appointed. She was replaced by Peter Doane as President. Also wishing to retire as trustees was Peter Jay and Susan Lodge. They were replaced by their children.

Trustees

Peter Doane, President

Charlie Doane, Secretary

Sarah Jay

Vice Presidents

Houston Huffman, Treasurer

Alexander Trevor

John B Trevor IV

Tielman Van Vleck

Dr Theodora Budnick

Susan Lodge

ExOfficio

John Jay Du Bois

 

 

 

MARY RUTHERFURD JAY and Jay Cemetery

MARY RUTHERFURD JAY, WW II, Geneaology, Jay Cemetery

Mary Rutherfurd Jay, who was born in 1872 the third child of Rev Peter Augustus Jay and Julia Post, grew up in the new house in Rye with her Grandfather, John Clarkson Jay, her mother, and her two brothers Pierre and John and her sister Laura. She was educated to become a very well known garden architect, and under her grandfathers interests developed special knowledge in Japanese Gardens. Before WW II she traveled extensively to give lectures on gardens and designed many gardens in the Northeast. With WW II her interests changed.

At this time she was 65 years old. Documentation of the family and involvement with the Jay Cemetery became projects for her. In 1935 she was asked by the Trustees of the Jay Cemetery to prepare a table tracing the genealogy of the family, showing all those who had the right of burial. One of these hangs in the Jay House today.

The Cemetery which was incorporated in 1906, when the surrounding property was no longer in the hands of the Jay Family, requires three Trustees who can delegate to officers the functions of running the cemetery. At the time of WW II the three trustees were Pierre Jay, Peter Jay, and John Clarkson Jay. Peter Jay and John Clarkson Jay were in the Armed Services. About 1940, MaryRutherfurd   Jay was appointed by them the President of the Cemetery.

At this time the recognition of the small size of the cemetery at 82/100 of an acre and the potential future sale of the surrounding land by Mr and Mrs Devereux made enlarging the cemetery to the maximum size by law of New York a primary project. In 1944 under Mary Rutherfurds lead this was started, and with approval of the Devereux the necessary funds were raised and approvals obtained. In FEB 1946 the Cemetery size was increased to 2.85 acres.

As part of this In 1947 she had published a small book on the history of the Jay Cemetery and had this distributed to all members of the family. Part of this is the tail of Eleanor Von Schweinitz, the daughter of Anna Jay, living in desperation after the end of WW II, receiving notice that a CARE package had arrived. Then she spent a day getting to the place of distribution to find the CARE was the book The JAY CEMETERY!

I believe she maintained her interest in the Cemetery until her death at age 81 in 1953. She was buried in the Jay Cemetery.
She was a remarkable woman.