JAY FAMILY PORTRAITS BY DANIEL HUNTINGTON

DANIEL HUNTINGTON
(Wiki) Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 – April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York City, New York, the son of Benjamin Huntington, Jr. and Faith Trumbull Huntington; his paternal grandfather was Benjamin Huntington, delegate at the Second Continental Congress and first U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

He studied at Yale with Samuel F.B. Morse, and later with Henry Inman (painter). From 1833 to 1835 he transferred to Hamilton College in Clinton, New York, where he met Charles Loring Elliott, who encouraged him to become an artist. He first exhibited his work at the National Academy of Design in 1836. Subsequently he painted some landscapes in the tradition of the Hudson River School. Huntington made several trips to Europe, the first in 1839 traveling to England, Rome, Florence and Paris with his friend and pupil Henry Peters Gray. On his return to America in 1840, he painted his allegorical painting “Mercy’s Dream”, which brought him fame and confirmed his interest in inspirational subjects. He also painted portraits and began the illustration of The Pilgrim’s Progress. In 1844, he went back to Rome. Returning to New York around 1846, he devoted his time chiefly to portrait-painting, although he painted many genre, religious and historical subjects.[1] From 1851 to 1859 he was in England. He was president of the National Academy of Design from 1862 to 1870, and again in 1877-1890.[1] He was also vice president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[2]

The REPUBLICAN COURT: Reception of Mrs Washington

Lady Washington’s Reception – large 1867 engraving after Daniel Huntington painting

(Jay Heritage Center Collection)  The line and stipple engraving above is one of several recent gifts made to the Jay Heritage Center this month. The antique print was produced by A.H. Ritchie in 1867 and based on the original 1861 painting by Daniel Huntington titled “The Republican Court.” Huntington’s painting, was completed at the beginning of the Civil War; the scene harkened back to what was seen in hindsight as a more harmonious time between the states — the founding of our union –and it represented an idealized assembly of the leaders of that period (Northern and Southern) in a European, court like setting. The image prominently features John Jay, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton on the left, Martha Washington on the dais, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington center ground and Sarah Livingston Jay on the far right and many other familiar personages of the Revolutionary War.

Daniel Huntington (1816 – 1906) won acclaim and prominence as the favored portraitist of New York Society after the Civil War. Though he was equally skilled at genre works and Hudson River style landscapes, he is best known for his likenesses of presidents, statesmen and other distinguished Americans including his painting of Abraham Lincoln that hangs at the Union League Club in Manhattan where the Jays were also members. Huntington’s training included studying with Jay family colleagues like John Trumbull (who is pictured in the engraving above), and Samuel F. B. Morse, then president of the National Academy of Design, whose successful career as an artist preceded his renown as an inventor. Huntington’s leadership roles in the artistic community were many: he was a member of the National Academy of Design for most of his life and served as its president for 22 years (1862 – 1870; 1877 – 1891). He was a founder and president of the Century Association and as vice-president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art for 33 years, he helped that institution expand and grow in stature. Differentiating it from the painting, the popular steel engraving was retitled “Lady Washington’s Reception” and a key identifying each of the 64 individuals shown was printed in magazines and newspapers of the time.

The original oil painting is at the Brooklyn Museum of. Art:www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/objects/487   Jay Heritage Center 210 Boston Post Road. Rye, NY 10580.  (914) 698-9275 Email: jayheritagecenter@gmail.com

Daniel Huntington turned to portraiture painting late in his career and painted the portraits of many individuals. Part of this was portraits of relatives of John Jay painted between 1860 and 1880. This included portraits of John Clarkson Jay, Laura Prime Jay, with child, (Mrs John Clarkson Jay), Dr Henry Augustus Du Bois, Constance Fielder Bruen, (Mrs Alexander  Bruen ), Eleanore Kingsland Field Jay (Mrs John Jay, II), Alice Jay, Frederick Prime, and William Jay. It also includes one miniature, probably painted after Sarah Livingston Jay death based on an existing miniature

SARAH LIVINGSTON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington(1816-1906)  



SARAH LIVINGSTON JAY (jj4/1)

Sarah Livingston Jay, was a charming, warm, intelligent woman, who loved to entertain and give parties. She provided a needed balance to John Jay, who was serious and ponderous. When John Jay was sent to Spain during the Revolution, they sailed with the French Ambassador who was a very difficult person. A storm crippled the vessel and they floated in the Atlantic awaiting rescue. Mrs. Jay learned that it was the Ambassador’s birthday and opened her baggage trunks to break out a Gala for him! While in Paris she became good friends with the Marquise de Lafayette and because of similarity of looks was often mistaken for her. The Paris Opera audience once rose to its feet thinking on her entrance that Mrs. Jay was Queen. Before she left Paris the Marquise gave her clothing that she wore when she entertained on her return to New York. This apparently upset many of the ladies of New York, who could not compete with her finery. Her “salon” became a place to be seen, and her guests included the Beekmans, the Clarksons, the Stirlings, the de Peysters, the Van Cortlands, the Rutherfords, the Van Rensselaers, and the Ralph Izards. She died at age 45, on May 28,1802, just before the completion of their retirement home in Katonah. The list of arrangements for her funeral included as guests, in addition to the family, almost every important family name in New York. She was buried in the Family Vault in the Bowerie and her remains later removed to the Jay Cemetery plot

 MARY RUTHERFURD CLARKSON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington


Mary Clarkson was the only child of General Matthew Clarkson and Mary RUTHERFURD. She married Peter Augustus Jay, the oldest son of John Jay and Sarah Livingston. They had seven children almost all or their spouses were also painted by Daniel Huntington!  

1870

Frick Digital Archive Collection

Artist: Daniel Huntington Medium: Pastel Comment: Photograph of original oil on canvas in the John Jay Collection, La Jolla, San Diego, Califonia, USA

  JOHN CLARKSON JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington (1816-1906)

Sitter: Dr. John Clarkson Jay.  DATE:1872 painting (visual work) canvas.  oil (paint).  H: 30 in, W: 25



He was the son of Peter A. Jay and grandson of Founding Father John Jay, diplomat, first Chief Justice of the United States and two time Governor of New York State. J. C. Jay graduated from his father and grandfather’s alma mater Columbia in 1827, and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1831. In addition to his practice of medicine, he made a specialty of conchology, and acquired the most complete and valuable collection of shells in the United States.[1] This and his costly library on this branch of science were purchased by Catherine Wolfe and presented, in memory of her father, to the American Museum of Natural History, where it is known as the Jay Collection.

LAURA PRIME JAY with Child (wife of John Clarkson Jay)

ARTIST: Daniel Huntington, 14 Oct 1816 – 18 Apr 1906

SITTER: Laura Prime Jay, 1812 -1888 Oil on canvas. 76.8cm x 63.5cm (30 1/4″ x 25″), Accurate
DATE: 1900: Current Owner: Museum of the City of New York

He married Laura Prime (1812-1888) and they had seven children that lived to adulthood. Laura Prime’s father was Nathaniel Prime, a prominent NY banker and one of the wealthiest men in the colony. Her brother Frederick Prime married Mary Rutherfurd Jay, John Clarkson Jay’s sister.
After the death of his father in 1848, when he was 35 years of age, he moved from his home in New York City on Bond Street to the house in Rye, that his father had rebuilt and lived there with his wife Laura for the rest of his life.


ALICE JAY daughter of John Clarkson Jay

Artist: Daniel Huntington,  1816-1906

Sitter: Alice Jay. Date about 1900. Oil on canvas. Given to the Jay Heritage Center in 2012.

                   Written by Suzanne Clary  

The Jay Heritage Center (JHC) recently received an extraordinary gift from one of John Jay’s descendants. In celebration of the continued restoration of the 1838 Jay House in Rye, Ada Hastings of Great Barrington, Massachusetts and her family magnanimously donated a portrait of John Jay’s great granddaughter that once hung in the mansion’s Drawing Room. The painting will be unveiled to the public for the first time on May 15, 2011.
The luminescent painting of a young Alice Jay by pre-eminent artist Daniel Huntington is documented in sepia toned family photos from 1886; it is visible hanging in a prominent location next to two other famous artworks originally owned by the Jays of Rye: Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of John Jay (which today is on view at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C.) and Asher Durand’s depiction of Peter Augustus Jay (which belongs to New York Hospital where Peter Augustus Jay served as President of the Board.)

The young subject of the painting, Alice Jay, along with her parents and siblings, lived both in New York and at the Rye estate during the mid and late 19th century. Windows into Alice’s life and times, particularly during the Civil War, are well documented in family letters and diaries. Alice’s father, Dr. John Clarkson Jay, was John Jay’s grandson and a vocal opponent of slavery like his grandfather and father before him. Through the local Episcopal church where he served on the vestry, he was instrumental in spearheading efforts in Rye to recruit volunteers for the Union efforts during the Civil War, a campaign which drew enlistments from Alice’s two older brothers, Peter, who became Captain of a local militia, and John, who served as an assistant surgeon. Alice’s sister kept a diary in which she wrote proudly in 1862, “Rye is called the banner town of the county for she has raised more men by volunteering than any of the other towns.”

    

Dr  HENRY AUGUSTUS Du BOIS, husband of CATHARINE HELENA JAY

Artist: Daniel Huntington 1816-1909

Subject: Henry Augustus Du Bois, oil on canvass. Owned by John Jay Du Bois

 

Henry Augustus was the fourth child of Cornelius and Sarah Ogden Du Bois. He was educated in Paris and then went to College of Physicians and Surgeons for his M.D. He returned to France to study medicine and then returned to New York in 1834, a year before he was married to Catharine Helena Jay, the grand daughter of John Jay. He practiced in New York until 1840, and because of poor health retired. His father inherited land between the banks of the Mahoning River in Ohio and they were involved with the settlement of a new community, Newton Falls. During this time he was president of the Virginia Channel Coal Co. They moved back to New Haven in 1854, where he lived until he died at age 76. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery.

ANNA MARIA JAY married Henry Evelyn PIERREPONT

Artist:   Daniel Huntington  1816-1906

Sitter:  Anna Maria Jay PIERREPONT, oil on canvas, given to the Jay Heritage Center June 2015

  
ANNA MARIA JAY** Birth 12 Sep 1819 in New York City, New York, Death 2 Jan 1902 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, married HENRY EVELYN PIERPONT Birth 8 Aug 1808 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, Death 28 Mar 1888 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, They had six children.


Henry Evelyn Pierrepont:The second son of Hezekiah Beers and Anna Maria Constable Pierrepont, Henry Evelyn was born in Brooklyn on August 8, 1808. Henry Evelyn was educated in New York City and quickly acquired his father’s prominence among Brooklyn’s elite. Upon the death of H.B. Pierpont, William Constable, the eldest Pierrepont son, took over the family’s upstate properties while Henry Evelyn remained in Brooklyn, maintaining the family’s influence on, and commitment to, the city’s development. On December 1, 1841, Henry Evelyn married Anna Maria Jay, daughter of Peter Augustus Jay and Mary Rutherford Clarkson, and granddaughter of John Jay, governor of New York (1795-1801) and the first Chief Justice of the United States. Together the couple had six children, including Henry Evelyn Pierrepont II and John Jay Pierrepont.

ELLEN ALMIRA LOW married HENRY EVELYN PIERRPONT, II

ARTIST Daniel Huntington, American, 1816-1906 MEDIUM Oil on canvas  DATES 1847 DIMENSIONS 64 x 53 15/16 in. (162.5 x 137 cm) (show scale) INSCRIPTIONS Inscribed verso: “Ellen Almira Low 24 yrs. 3 mos./ Hariette Low 4 yrs. 8 mos./ Ellen Almira Low 1 yr./ D. Huntington. Pinxt./ N.Y. June 30, 1847.”

CREDIT LINE Gift of Mrs. William Raymond

  

CAPTION Daniel Huntington (American, 1816-1906). Ellen Almira Low and Her Three Children, 1847. Oil on canvas, 64 x 53 15/16 in. (162.5 x 137 cm). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Mrs. William Raymond 

 FREDERICK PRIME married Mary Rutherford JAY

Artist:  Daniel Huntington  1816-1906

Sitter: Frederick Prime  oil on canvas. At the Jay Homestead in Bedford, NY

Frederick I. Prime, a Son of Nathaniel Prime and Owner of Edgewood Frederick I. Prime attended Yale, studied law and was admitted to the bar of the State of New York as a young man. He married his first wife, Mary Rutherfurd Jay, and entered practice with her father, his new father-in-law, Peter A. Jay who served as Recorder of New York City. Frederick and Mary Prime had three children before Mary died on September 9, 1835. (She is buried in the Jay Graveyard in Rye, New York.) Their children were Mary Rutherford Prime, born in New York on August 24, 1830; Harriet Prime, born in New York on September 11, 1832; and Helen Jay Prime, born in New York on August 22, 1835. Frederick Prime’s wife, Mary Prime, died only eighteen days after the couple’s third child was born.

 

MRS JOHN JAY, II (Eleanor Field) married JOHN JAY, II

Artist:  Daniel Huntington, 1816-1906

Sitter: Mrs John Jay, II wife of JJ II, oil on canvas,  hangs at the Jay Homestead in Bedford.

  

Eleanor Kingsland Field was the daughter of Hickson Field, of New York. She married John Jay II in 1837. The miniature she wears on the bracelet on her left arm is said to be that of her son, William Jay (1841-1915).
bio: John Jay II was a man of several occupations including diplomat, abolitionist, farmer, lawyer and public service. He was a member of the Jay family, one of the most prominent in New York State and American history. John was very devoted to many causes along with having a strong moral compass, great integrity and a gentle persona. He was born in 1817. John was the third of eight children born to William and August McVickar Jay and a grandson of John Jay, the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court. He was raised with five sisters while another brother and sister died very young and enjoyed a childhood of privilege and happiness. As his father and grandfather before him, John also received a classical education in the highest tradition. When John was fifteen, he began studies at Columbia College in New York City and ranked second in the class of 1836. He began legal studies in New York City after graduation and entered the bar in 1839. John practiced law for the next nineteen years until his father’s death in 1858. After retiring from his law practice, he pursued his favorite causes and ran the family businesses. John provided a life of comfort and ease for his family. He married Eleanor Kingsland Field, a strong willed woman, in June 1837 at the Jay home in Bedford, New York. They enjoyed 57 years of marriagealong with a “Jaybilee,” a celebration of their fiftieth wedding anniversary.

CONSTANCE FIELDER BRUEN

Artist: Daniel Huntington.  1816-1906

Sitter: Mrs Alexander Jay BRUEN,  oil on canvas.


The testatrix gives her family sliver and portraits to her children which includes a portrait of herself bv Huntington, the_ Jay„ silver, aqd “the”port rait of her father and mother. WHHam Jay and Augusta J

Yale obit: Yale obit

jsdubois28added this on 20 Jul 2013 

Alexander Jay Bruen, B.A. 1878. Born August 10,1855, in Newport, R.I. Died February 25, 1937, in New York City. Father, Alexander McWhorter Bruen (B.A. Rutgers 1836; M.D. Columbia 1836); son of Mathias and Hannah (Coe) Bruen. Mother, Louisa (Jay) Bruen; daughter of William Jay (B.A. 1807) and Hannah Augusta (McVickar) Jay. Yale relatives include: Peter A. Jay, hon- orary M.A. 1798 /(fflgtt«ncle); W. Livingston Bruen, ’79 (brother); Attended scho||WHH|^Hwk City, Paris and Nice, France, and Dresden, Germarrj^jpS^wHoquy appointment Senior year; mem- ber Dunham Boat Club, Gamma Nu, and Linonia.« Attended Columbia Law School («r-i88o); practiced law independ- ently m New York City until retirement in 1927; author: Our Charities and Bow ‘They are Managed; member St. James Presbyterian Church, New York City. Married June 19, 1907, in Little Silver, N.J., Constance Louise; daughter of Edward Charles and Eliza Winthrop (Carville) Fiedler. Children: Alexander Jay, Jr., ’32; Edward Fiedler Livingston; Con- stance Louisa Jay Fiedler; and Evelyn Louisa. Mrs. Bruen died Novem- ber 25> l93S- Death due to pneumonia. Buried in Jay Cemetery, Rye, N.Y. Sur- vived by children.

WILLIAM JAY

nArtist: Daniel Huntington (1816 – 1906), Comment: Original painting in the collection of John Jay Homestead, Katonah, Westchester, New York, USA

  
He was born in New York City, and graduated from Yale in 1808. After his graduation, he took up the management of his father’s large estate in Westchester County, New York, and also studied law at Albany. Poor eyesight soon compelled him to give up the legal profession. He early became interested in various philanthropic enterprises and reforms and identified himself especially with the temperance, antislavery, and antiwar movements. He was one of the founders (in 1816) of the American Bible Society, which he defended against the vigorous attacks of the High Church party, led by Bishop Hobart. He was judge of common pleas in New York from 1818 to 1820, and was first judge of Westchester County from 1820 to 1842, when he was removed on account of his antislavery views.

BRUEN geneaology

BRUEN genealogy.

Descendants of WILLIAM JAY and HANNAH McVICKER 


WILLIAM JAY: Third Generation PJ-JJ-WJ


“(Wiki bio)He was born in New York City, and graduated from Yale in 1808. After his graduation, he took up the management of his father’s large estate in Westchester County, New York, and also studied law at Albany. Poor eyesight soon compelled him to give up the legal profession. He early became interested in various philanthropic enterprises and reforms and identified himself especially with the temperance, antislavery, and antiwar movements. He was one of the founders (in 1816) of the American Bible Society, which he defended against the vigorous attacks of the High Church party, led by Bishop Hobart. He was judge of common pleas in New York from 1818 to 1820, and was first judge of Westchester County from 1820 to 1842, when he was removed on account of his antislavery views.

An enthusiastic member of the American Antislavery Society, whose constitution he drafted, Jay stood with Birney at the head of the conservative abolitionists, and by his calm, logical, and judicial writings exerted for many years a powerful influence. From 1835 to 1837 he was the society’s corresponding foreign secretary. In 1840, however, when the society began to advocate measures which he deemed too radical, he withdrew his membership, but with his pen he continued his labor on behalf of the slave, urging emancipation in the District of Columbia and the exclusion of slavery from the territories, though deprecating any attempt to interfere with slavery in the states. He was also a proponent of antiwar theories and was for many years president of the Peace Society. His pamphlet War and Peace: the Evils of the First with a Plan for Securing the Last, advocating international arbitration, was published by the English Peace Society in 1842, and is said to have contributed to the promulgation, by the powers signing the Treaty of Paris in 1856, of a protocol expressing the wish that nations, before resorting to arms, should have recourse to the good offices of a friendly power.

Jay was married with 8 children, all but 2 survived to adulthood. These included the lawyer John Jay (1817-1894), Anna Jay Balch, Maria Jay Butterworth, Sarah Louisa Jay Bruen and Augusta Jay Pellew.[citation needed]”


Fourth Generation: SARAH LOUISA JAY(1819-1905)married ALEXANDER McVICKER BRUEN(1803-1886) 

Sarah Louisa Jay was the fourth child and third female descendant of William and Hannah Jay. She was brought up in Bedford. In 1840 at age 21 she married Alexander Bruen and after time in New York moved to Scarsdale. They had three children. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery in Rye.

“The old mansion, which has long since disappeared, was constructed in the French chateau style, and commanded splendid views of the surrounding country. The property, after Mr. Cooper’s death, was sold by Mr. Cooper’s children to Alexander McWhorter Bruen, M.D., who married Sarah Louisa Jay, third daughter of the Hon. William Jay, of Bedford. The Bruens descend from a family of that name, formerly seated at Bruen, Stapleford, Cheshire, England. Robert Le Bruen, of that place, in 12 30, was the ancestor of the celebrated John Bruen, Esquire,5 of Bruen, Stapleford, who was born in 1560, and died 162 5. His son, Obadiah Bruen, was entered a freeman of Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, in 1640, Before 1650, he was chosen seven times deputy to the General Court, from Gloucester. From the latter place he removed to New London. In the charter of Connecticut, granted by Charles II., his name appears as one of the patentees of the Colony. From New London he removed in 1667, with his son John to Milford (now the city of Newark, New Jersey). John, his son, left Eleazer the father of Eleazer the grandfather of Matthias Bruen, Esq., father of the present Alexander M. Bruen, M.D., of Scarsdale.”

MRS. ALEXANDER M. BRUEN PASSES QUIETLY AWAY.   (obit)Louisa Jay Bruen, widow of Dr. Alexander M Bruen, died at her home on Mamaroneck Road on Sun November 6th, aged ninety. The funeral which was held In the , Constable Memorial Church at Mamaroneck, two o’clock yesterday afternoon. Interment was made in the Jay family burial ground on the Jay Estate at Rye, where her husband also Is buried. Mrs. Bruen’s husband, Dr. Alexander M. Bruen, who was well known In New York and Washington, died In 1886. She was a sister of the late John Jay and a granddaughter of Chief Justice John Jay. Besides a sister, Mrs. Henry E. Pettew of , Washington, she leaves three children, Alexander Jay Bruen, William’ Livingston Bruen and Mrs. Ide, wife of Rear Admiral George E. Ide, retired. She was an aunt of Colonel William jay and Mrae. von Schwelnltz, wife of General von Schweinitf, formerly German Ambassador to Austria. . Mrs. Bruen’s father. Judge William Jay, whose home was at Bedford, N. Y., was an eminent jurist, author and philanthropist. Her mother was Miss Augusta McVicker daughter of John McVicker, of Bedford.” Dr. Bruen bought the property on the Mamaroneck Road about the time of their marriage. The house in which JF Cooper lived when he wrote the Spy, was then on the site of the present house which Dr. Bruen built, and which has been 4he family home ever since. Dr. and Mrs. Bruen at one time spent a large part of their time in Washington, D. C. A few years ago Mrs. Bruen established a home for old people and children, and gave them the use of the Washington house. This benevolence she has since maintained. About two years ago Mrs. Bruen suffered a stroke of paralysis which affected the eyelids so that she could not keep them open, rendering her practically blind. In spite of her age she Was in the habit of walking and driving about a great deal, until a month ago, when she became unable to leave the house. She was not, however, kept abed and was , drinking her coffee Sunday morning, when she died. The family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends, in their bereavement —(Scarsdale Inquirer Nov 1905)

Fifth Generation: Children of LOUISA JAY and ALEXANDER McVICKER BRUEN 

1. ALEXANDRA LOUISA BRUEN married Rear Admiral GEORGE ELMORE IDE 

2. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN married CONSTANCE FIELDER

3. LIVINGSTON BRUEN married ELIZABETH ARCHER

      1. ALEXANDRA LOUISA BRUEN
Fifth Generation: Alexandra Louisa Bruen, born 1848. Died 1938. Married George Elmore IDE. They had one child. Both were buried in the Jay Cemetery.

Bio: IDE, George Elmore: Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy; born in Zanesville, Ohio, Dec. 6, 1845; son of Dr. William E. and Angelina (Sullivan) Ide. He was appointed to the U. S. Naval Academy in 1861, and graduated in 1865. In the summer of 1862 and 1864, while midshipman, cruised after Confederate steamers Tallahassee and Florida; in 1870, went to Greenland on Juniata in search of Polaris survivors, and same year took Virginius filibusters from Santiago, Cuba, to New York. Served on various ships, including the Kenosha, which, in 1871, escorted English battleship Monrach to Portland, Me., carrying remains of George Peabody, philanthropist; commanded steamer Justin off Santiago, during Spanish War; took United States steamer Yosemite to Guam, 1899, carrying governor of island and surveying the harbor, in view of making it a cable and coaling station in 1900; commanded United States steamship New Orleans, on Manila Station; thence to Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, as captain of yard until retired as rear-admiral, Sept. 26, 1901, after forty years’ service. RearAdmiral Ide is a member of the Metropolitan, City, New York Athletic and New York Yacht Clubs of New York City. He married at Fortress Monroe, Va., July 28, 1889, Alexandra Louise Bruen. Address: 1128 Madison Avenue, New York City.

Sixth Generation: Children of ALEXANDRA LOUISA BRUEN and GEORGE ELMORE IDE

      1. JOHN JAY IDE married DORA BROWNING DONNER

Sixth Generation. John Jay IDE Birth 26 Jun 1890 in Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island Death 01 Dec 1962 marriage at age 53 to Dora Browning DONNER Birth 18 Oct 1916 in Pennsylvania Death 18 Dec 1998 in San Francisco. They had no children.

Obit: Most people have never heard of John Jay Ide (Jun. 20, 1892-Jan. 12, 1962), who was an international aviation pioneer and European representative for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Born at Narragansett Pier, Rhode Island, he was the son of Rear Admiral George E. Ide of the U.S. Navy, and Alexandra Bruen Ide. Ide was the great-grandson of John Jay, early national diplomat and first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

John Ide attended the Browning School in New York City, and upon graduation from Columbia University in 1913 he received a certificate in architecture. He then studied architecture at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris for the next year before returning to New York to work as an architect. When the United States entered World War in 1917, Ide enlisted in the Naval Reserve Flying Corp and rose to the rank of lieutenant. He also took the opportunity to court and marry Dora Browning Donner of Philadelphia, the daughter of philanthropist and steel financier William Henry Donner when he was 53. With war clouds gathering around the world, in 1940 the U.S. Navy recalled Ide to active duty, commissioning him as a lieutenant commander and placing him in command of the Foreign Intelligence Branch of the Bureau of Aeronautics in Washington. He served in that post until 1943, when the Federal government appointed him a Tactical Air Intelligence Officer in Europe. In this capacity Ide helped to survey at the conclusion of the war in Europe the aeronautical capabilities of the defeated Nazi Germany. Although mustered out of active military duty with the rank of Navy Captain in late 1945, Ide remained in Europe as representative for the NACA for the next five years. There he continued the work he had undertaken in 1921 as a representative for the organization as a conduit for technical information about the development of aviation technology on the continent. He retired from that position in 1950.

John Ide returned to the United States soon after retirement from the NACA, residing in New York City. He was socially prominent in that city, as well as in Washington, D.C., and Palm Beach, Florida. He served in a variety of honorary positions during this period, vice president of the International Aeronautic Federation, president of the International Sporting Commission, board member of the National Aeronautic Association, trustee of the Museum of the City of New York, manager of the American Bible Society, and a vestryman of the St. Bartholomew’s Protestant Episcopal Church in New York.

Ide returned to France in 1958 to present a plaque to commemorate the site in Paris where John Jay participated in the signing of the peace treaty between Britain and the United States in 1783 that ended the American Revolution. He died at his Park Avenue home in New York City on Jan. 12, 1962, at age 69.

He wrote and published a book on the portraits of John Jay.

     2. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN

Fifth Generation. Alexander Jay BRUEN+ Birth abt 1855 in Newport, Rhode Island. Death 25 FEB 1937 in New York, New York, married Constance FIEDLER+ Birth abt 1880 in New Jersey Death 1935 They had three children. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery.

(Yale obit) Alexander Jay Bruen, B.A. 1878. Born August 10,1855, in Newport, R.I. Died February 25, 1937, in New York City. Father, Alexander McWhorter Bruen (B.A. Rutgers 1836; M.D. Columbia 1836); son of Mathias and Hannah (Coe) Bruen. Mother, Louisa (Jay) Bruen; daughter of William Jay (B.A. 1807) and Hannah Augusta (McVickar) Jay. Yale relatives include: Peter A. Jay, honorary M.A. 1798, W. Livingston Bruen, ’79 (brother); He Attended school in, Paris and Nice, France, and Dresden, Germany. Appointment his Senior year; member Dunham Boat Club, Gamma Nu, and Linonia. Attended Columbia Law School («r-i88o); practiced law independ- ently New York City until retirement in 1927; author: Our Charities and How ‘They are Managed; member St. James Presbyterian Church, New York City. Married June 19, 1907, in Little Silver, N.J., Constance Louise Fiedler, daughter of Edward Charles and Eliza Winthrop (Carville) Fiedler. Children: Alexander Jay, Jr., ’32; Edward Livingston; Constance Louisa Jay ; and Evelyn Louisa. Mrs. Bruen died November 25> l93S- Death due to pneumonia. Buried in Jay Cemetery, Rye, N.Y. Survived by children.

Sixth Generation: CHILDREN OF ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN and CONSTANCE FIEDLER

1. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN, Jr married LORNA HARRAH

2. EDWARD LIVINGSTON BRUEN married MARIAN STUYVESANT GREY

3. EVELYN LOUISA BRUEN married JOHN BOND TREVOR

4. CONSTANCE LOUISA JAY BRUEN married DONALD F BARROW

     1. ALEXANDER JAY BRUEN, Jr

1. Sixth Generation. Alexander Jay BRUEN+** Birth 16 Oct 1910 in New York City Death 20 Sep 1991 in Narragansett, Washington, Rhode iSland married Lorna HARRAH+ Birth 26 Jul 1923 in Rhode Island Death

Alexander Jay Bruen practiced Law at Sullivan and Cromwell. He was a Trustee and acted as treasurer of the Jay Cemetery in the 1960-1990’s. They had no children.

     2. EDWARD LIVINGSTON BRUEN

2. Sixth Generation. Edward Livingston BRUEN+* Birth 21 Feb 1913 in New York. Death 23 2004 in Oyster Bay, Nassau, New York, married Marian Natalie Stuyvesant GRAY+ Birth 2 Mar 1912 in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York Death 15 May 2000 in Oyster Bay, Nassau, New York, They are both buried in the Jay Cemetery. They had two children

“Judge Gray’s son, Albert Zabriskie Gray, married Marian Anthon Fish in 1907. They had a daughter, Marian Stuyvesant Gray, who married Edward Fiedler Livingston Bruen in 1942 and had two children: a son, Nicholas Livingston Bruen, who lives in New York, and a daughter, Dr. Marian Anthon Bruen, who married Dr. Charles Ainsworth Staveley Marrin in 1976. They live in Vermont, and have a daughter Minet Anthon Bruen Marrin, who is a Latin teacher. Nicholas, Marian, and Minet are also descendants of John Jay and Robert Livingston.”

     3. EVELYN LOUISA BRUEN

Sixth Generation. Evelyn Louisa BRUEN+* Birth 27 Dec 1914 in New City Death May 14, 2001 in Palm Beach, Florida, married John Bond TREVOR+ Jr Birth 4 JUL 1909 in New York, New York Death August 27, 2006 in Paul Smiths, Lake Saranac, Franklin, New York. They were both buried in the Jay Cemetery. They had three children.

Evelyn Trevor was secretary of the Jay Cemetery for many years and meetings were held in their townhouse at 11 East 91st Street.

“When Andrew Carnegie purchased the expansive lot for his mansion across from Central Park in 1899, the neighborhood was still-sparsely developed. Broken rows of brownstone dwellings dotted the streets around East 90th and 91st Streets; but the great mansions of New York’s wealthiest citizens had, for the most part, not advanced beyond 70th Street. A block away from No. 15 East 90th was the mansion of John B. Trevor at No. 11 East 91st Street. Emily Trevor had grown up in that house and in 1926 she acquired the old brownstone at No. 15.

Emily Trevor was, perhaps, not so intrepid as to move to the far East Side; but she did follow suit in her choice of architects and design. Emily, also unmarried, had the old Lawrence house demolished and she commissioned Mott Schmidt to design an up-to-date mansion befitting the neighborhood. Mott created a charming three-and-a-half story neo-Federal home that would have been quite at home on Sutton Place. Clad in Flemish bond red brick, it was trimmed in contrasting white stone. The double entrance doors were sheltered by a refined Corinthian portico that supported an iron-railed balcony at the second floor. Emily moved into the new house in 1929 and in 1931, following his graduation from Columbia College, her bachelor brother John B. Trevor, Jr. joined her. When his engagement to Evelyn Louisa Bruen was announced seven years later, the match made headlines in the society pages.”

Obit: PALM BEACH Fla. Evelyn L. Bruen Trevor, 86, a resident of Palm Beach, Fla., died quietly at her home on May 14, 2001. She was born on Dec. 27, 1914, the fourth and youngest child of Alexander Jay Bruen and Constance Fiedler Bruen. She was a great-great-granddaughter of John Jay, the first chief justice of the United States. She attended the Nightingale School in New York City. She married John B. Trevor Jr. on Nov 18, 1938 in New York City.

Mrs. Trevor and her family were summer visitors to the St. Regis lakes for many years.

Survivors include her husband of 425 Worth Ave., Palm Beach. Fla.; her three children: John B Trevor III of Lake Placid. Alexander B. Trevor of Worthington, Ohio and Emily Trevor Van Vleck of Lyme, N.H.; nine grandchildren; five greatgrandchildren and her brother, Edward L. Bruen of Oyster Bay

     4. CONSTANCE LOUISA JAY BRUEN

Obit BARROW-Constance L.J.B., on 4 October 1997. Beloved wife of the late Donald F. Barrow. Mother of Elizabeth Doering and Constance Hurley. Grandmother of Elizabeth, Dennis and Lily. Sister of the late Alexander J. Bruen, Edward F.L. Bruen and Evelyn B. Trevor. Services on October 10 at 11 AM at St. John’s Church, Cold Spring Harbor. In lieu of flowers, donations to Animal Rescue and Rehabilitation, POB 61, Syosset, New York 11791.

 

 

 

The Jay Cemetery: History of Trustees

History of The Jay Cemetery

The Jay Cemetery was established by John Jay in 1805. Before this family members, which included his wife Sarah Livingston Jay, were buried in a family vault, situated in the Orchard of Peter Stuyvesant, next to St Marks in the Bowerie on 10th St. and Second Ave. Several changes were happening in New York at this time. The new grid system organizing the City into Avenues and Streets meant the Orchard Burial site was to become 10th St. There was a need to remove the family vaults and this was obviously a reason the Jay Vault was moved to Rye in 1807. The decision to place the Cemetery in the East Meadow had been made in 1805, when the youngest son of John Jay’s daughter Maria died and was the first to be buried on the Rye Estate.
Why did the orchard of Peter Stuyvesant in the Bowery become the site for the family vault? I believe it goes back to the wife of Augustus Jay, the first Jay to settle in this country, Anna Maria Bayard. Her paternal grandmother was Anna Stuyvesant Bayard, the sister of Peter Stuyvesant, who had come to New Amsterdam as a widow with her four children to help her brother. She was buried with her brother in what now is St Marks on the Bowerie at 11th St. Burial of Augustus and Anna Maria was probably the start of the Jay Family vault
In 1815 John Jay, on inheriting the Rye property, set aside as a family cemetery the lot where the burials had occurred and named his eldest son Peter Augustus Jay and nephew Peter Jay Munro as Trustees. He stated that any descendant of his father Peter Jay was eligible for burial. (Also husbands, wives, and widows of such descendants)
Peter Jay Munro  died in 1833 and Peter Augustus Jay died in 1843. From 1843 to 1891 John Clarkson Jay became the owner of the property and, in trust, of the Cemetery as well. It was managed by him during this period. At the time of his death the property was inherited by his heirs and his son also John Clarkson Jay was involved with its upkeep. When the property was sold in 1905 it was necessary to formalize ownership of the Cemetery and a right of way from the Post Road to it. In 1906, The Jay Cemetery, incorporated under the laws of New York State, was started which was to be held and maintained by three trustees. The trustees designated were:

John Clarkson Jay II, the son of John Clarkson Jay to continue as President until his retirement  in 1920.

Banyer Clarkson, the son of Susan Matilda Jay who married Matthew Clarkson until his retirement in 1928.

John Jay, the youngest son of Rev Peter Augustus Jay who served until his death in 1928.

They all were involved with the incorporation, early financial planning and maintenance of the Cemetery.
At the time of their retirements new trustees were needed.
John Clarkson Jay III was named trustee in 1920 to replace his father. He served as Treasurer and was involved with increasing the endowment of the Cemetery until 1935.

DeLancey Kane Jay, the son of Augustus Jay replaced Banyer Clarkson in 1928. He served as secretary and was interested in the upkeep of the Cemetery. He also served until 1935.

Pierre Jay was named trustee after the death of his younger brother John Jay also in 1928. He served as treasurer after 1935 and continued as Trustee until 1945.

In 1935 new Trustees to replace John Clarkson Jay III and DeLancey Kane Jay were needed. John Clarkson Jay’s son also John Clarkson Jay IV replaced his father on the Board. The oldest son of Delancy Kane Jay was Peter Jay who became the third Trustee.
In 1938 World War II was brewing and both JCJ and PAJ were called to serve. In response to this in the early 1940’s it was decided to enlarge the number of Vice Presidents and appoint officers who were not Trustees. Also at this time it seemed necessary to enlarge the size of the Cemetery.
Pierre Jay would continue as Trustee until 1945.. His  sister Mary Rutherfurd  Jay had assumed a much more active role with the cemetery.  Starting in 1936, she prepared a genealogy table of the descendants of Peter Jay. One of these is on permanent exhibit in the Jay Heritage Center. Mary Rutherfurd  was appointed President about 1938 and became a trustee on the retirement of her brother in 1945. (Appointed Vice President was Sarah Jay Hughes and Elizabeth Jay Etnier, who served as interim Trustees during the War.)
Mary Rutherfurd  as president, took on three tasks. The first was to develop a genealogy of the family to include all related to John Jay’s father Peter Jay. This she completed in 1936. The second was to purchase property from the owners of the property, Mr and Mrs Walter Devereau, to enlarge the cemetery to its maximum of 2.85 acres. This took over two years to do, but in 1946 the purchase with approvals was completed. The third was to write and publish a book for the family on The Jay Cemetery. This was done in 1947.
She was also involved with her brother Pierre in increasing the endowment of the cemetery and raising funds for its enlargement. In 1947 the value of the Cemetery endowment fund was about $55,000. This was managed by the firm Pierre Jay had started now Fiduciary Trust.
By 1948 several other Vice Presidents had been appointed which included Dr Robert Ogden Du Bois, Elizabeth Jay Etnier, Alexander Duer Harvey, Rev William Dudley Hughes, Mrs Peter Augustus Jay, Seth Low Pierrepont, John Jay Ide, and Chauncey Devereux Stillman. Alexander Jay Bruen was appointed Treasurer and his sister Evelyn Bruen Trevor was made secretary.
In 1948, a new cemetery trustee and new officers were needed. Pierre Jay died in 1949 and Mary Rutherfurd  Jay wished to retire. At this time the two trustees were John Clarkson Jay IV and Peter Jay who had returned from the War. Alexander Jay Bruen who was serving as treasurer was appointed Trustee and he continued as treasurer of the Cemetery. Other officers were appointed. My Uncle, Dr. Robert Ogden Du Bois took over Mary Rutherfurds  role as president. He served as President until 1970, when I, his nephew was appointed. Evelyn Bruen Trevor became secretary. It was in her house, 15 East 90th Street, that all the annual meetings were held while she was secretary.
Under Alexander Jay Bruen guidance the legal framework of the Cemetery was strengthened and family sections for burial were defined. Increase in the Cemetery endowment came with his guidance. The Cemetery continued to use Fiduciary Trust for its investments.
The trustees at this time (1980) were:
Peter A Jay

John Clarkson Jay

Alexander Jay Bruen, Treasurer.

Officers
John Jay Du Bois, President

Evelyn Bruen Trevor, Secretary

With the retirement of the three trustees about 1980 a fourth group of trustees was needed.

John Jay Du Bois who became President when his Uncle retired in 1970 was appointed a Trustee.

Nicholas Jay Bruen was appointed Trustee and Treasurer to replace his Uncle.

Sybil Jay Baldwin was appointed Trustee and Secretary when her uncle Peter Jay retired.

Several Vice Presidents were also appointed that included Peter Jay, Charles Doane, Anne Patten Miliken, Edward Livingston Bruen,
This again was a period of property change. In 1965, the house and property owned by the Mr and Mrs Devereux since 1910 was to be sold. Very careful division of the land was planed by them. The bottom acreage was to be given to the County of Westchester to use for a Park. A side portion was to be sold in lots for housing to give tax revenue to the City of Rye. The Peter Augustus Jay House and surrounding property were to be given to the Methodist Church.
The upper portion of land including the Greek Revival house built by Peter Augustus Jay that had been given to the Methodist Church was found to be impossible for them to maintain. This was put on the market and in 1983 was bought for Real Estate development. This started a long process spear headed by “The Jay Coalition”. The Jay Cemetery supported the effort to restore the PAJ house and preserve the property around it. President John Jay Du Bois and his wife Sharon were active with others in the Jay Coalition. This was successful but was not finalized until 1990. At this time the house has been restored and is being successfully run as the Jay Heritage Center.
In 1990 there was another need for a change in Trustees. John Jay Du Bois retired as President and became a trustee ex officio. Nicholas Jay Bruen who had served as Trustee and with Fiduciary Trust had managed the Cemetery endowment retired with health issues. Sybil Jay Baldwin also retired as Secretary.
New Trustees were needed.

Dr Theodora Budnick was named President,

Houston Huffman, Treasurer

Peter A Jay.
Vice Presidents include Charles Doane, Susan Lodge, John Trevor IV, Sandy Trevor and Tielman Van Vieck.

This group continud to manage the Cemeter from 1990 to 2017.  During this time the maintainance of the cemetery was of primary importance.  The endowment fund under Huston Huffman watch continued to grow. Cleaning of the stones and need for stone maintainance became an issue. The stone of John Jay and the flat stone marking the family burial plot from New York were cleaned. In 2016 it was decided to increase the number of Trustees from 3 to 5.  Huston Huffman wished to resign as a trustee but agreed to stay as treasurer. Joining Dr Theodora Budnick and Peter Jay as trustee were Peter Doane, Charlie Doane and Susan Lodge.  Sarah Huffman who had acted as secretary wished to resign and Charlie Doane was appointed secretary.

In 2017 Dr Theodora Budnick retired as President. and a new group of trustees was appointed. She was replaced by Peter Doane as President. Also wishing to retire as trustees was Peter Jay and Susan Lodge. They were replaced by their children.

Trustees

Peter Doane, President

Charlie Doane, Secretary

Sarah Jay

Vice Presidents

Houston Huffman, Treasurer

Alexander Trevor

John B Trevor IV

Tielman Van Vleck

Dr Theodora Budnick

Susan Lodge

ExOfficio

John Jay Du Bois

 

 

 

MARY RUTHERFURD JAY and Jay Cemetery

MARY RUTHERFURD JAY, WW II, Geneaology, Jay Cemetery

Mary Rutherfurd Jay, who was born in 1872 the third child of Rev Peter Augustus Jay and Julia Post, grew up in the new house in Rye with her Grandfather, John Clarkson Jay, her mother, and her two brothers Pierre and John and her sister Laura. She was educated to become a very well known garden architect, and under her grandfathers interests developed special knowledge in Japanese Gardens. Before WW II she traveled extensively to give lectures on gardens and designed many gardens in the Northeast. With WW II her interests changed.

At this time she was 65 years old. Documentation of the family and involvement with the Jay Cemetery became projects for her. In 1935 she was asked by the Trustees of the Jay Cemetery to prepare a table tracing the genealogy of the family, showing all those who had the right of burial. One of these hangs in the Jay House today.

The Cemetery which was incorporated in 1906, when the surrounding property was no longer in the hands of the Jay Family, requires three Trustees who can delegate to officers the functions of running the cemetery. At the time of WW II the three trustees were Pierre Jay, Peter Jay, and John Clarkson Jay. Peter Jay and John Clarkson Jay were in the Armed Services. About 1940, MaryRutherfurd   Jay was appointed by them the President of the Cemetery.

At this time the recognition of the small size of the cemetery at 82/100 of an acre and the potential future sale of the surrounding land by Mr and Mrs Devereux made enlarging the cemetery to the maximum size by law of New York a primary project. In 1944 under Mary Rutherfurds lead this was started, and with approval of the Devereux the necessary funds were raised and approvals obtained. In FEB 1946 the Cemetery size was increased to 2.85 acres.

As part of this In 1947 she had published a small book on the history of the Jay Cemetery and had this distributed to all members of the family. Part of this is the tail of Eleanor Von Schweinitz, the daughter of Anna Jay, living in desperation after the end of WW II, receiving notice that a CARE package had arrived. Then she spent a day getting to the place of distribution to find the CARE was the book The JAY CEMETERY!

I believe she maintained her interest in the Cemetery until her death at age 81 in 1953. She was buried in the Jay Cemetery.
She was a remarkable woman.

Why the Bowerie? Our Stuyvesant Relationship

JAY-STUYVESANT Relationships.
EARLY JAY BURIALS: The Jay Vault

The Jay who first came to what was to become the United States was AUGUSTE in 1687. As a young man he had returned from an Asian tour on one of his fathers boats just after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes into the port of La Rochelle. His family had been forced to flee. He was saved by a half Huguenot/half Catholic Aunt and smuggled aboard a vessel bound for Charleston, South Carolina. He moved to New Amsterdam and settled as a trader and married ANNA MARIKA BAYARD in 1697.

Anna BAYARD’s paternal grandmother was ANNA STUYVESANT, the sister of the early leader of New Amsterdam, PETER (Petrus) STUYVESANT. He had married Anna’s husband, SAMUEL BAYARD, sister JUDITH BAYARD. Samuel BAYARD had died in Holland in 1646 and the next year Anna with her four children sailed to New Amsterdam to join her brother Peter. There was a strong connection with the Stuyvesant family which may be why a burial vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard at St Marks in the Bowerie became the resting place for JAY family members until it was moved to Rye in 1807.

Anna Stuyvesant remarried but outlived her second husband. She died in 1683, ten years after her brother Peter who had been buried in a vault under the family chapel in the Stuyvesant orchard in the Bowerie. This was to become the site of St Mark’s in the Bowerie church. She probably was buried in this vault.

This may have been the start of the Jay Family vault. Anna Stuyvesant BAYARD brought four children to New Amsterdam. Balthazar, Nicholas, Petrus, and Catherine. The oldest, Balthazar married in 1664, Marietje Lookermans. It was their daughter ANNA MARIE BAYARD who married AUGUSTE JAY in 1697. Anna Marie died in 1726 and was interred in the Vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard in the Bowerie. Her husband Auguste died in 1751 and was also buried in the “family” vault. I believe they were the first “JAYs” to be interred in the St Marks vault.

During the Revolution, New York was occupied by English troops and no burials took place. The son of Auguste Jay and father of John Jay, Peter and his wife Mary Van COURTLANDT died in Fishkill and Pougkeepsie during this time and were buried in a vault near Fishkill.

After the Revolution John and Sarah Livingston moved back to New York and were involved with Trinity Church about 1784. Also their oldest son Peter Augustus went to Trinity. In 1795 Jay became Governor of New York and moved in his second term to the new state Capitol in Albany. He retired from that post at the end of his second term to live in Bedford in 1801.

There were several Jay burials during the period of 1780 and 1806. Three children of Peter and Mary Van Courtland were buried. In 1791 Anna Marika Jay was buried. She with Peter were the two children blinded by small pox in their youth. In 1799 Frederick Jay died. He was probably buried here along with his first wife who had died in 1791. In 1801 Augustus Jay died and was buried. He was the son with a learning disability. Finally Sarah Livingston Jay, John Jay’s wife, died in 1802 and was buried in the family vault.

During this time the Stuyvesant property in the Bowerie underwent change. In 1793 the great grandson of Peter Stuyvesant, also Petrus, sold the family chapel and land to the Episcopal church for $1.00. A new church was designed and built on the same site as the family chapel. St Mark’s in the Bowerie was consecrated in 1799.

It was soon after that, that the family decision was made to set aside a tract of land in the East Meadow on the Rye Estate as a burial plot. Changes were happening at St Mark’s which may have necessitated this. New York City was undergoing street planning grid changes and construction of 10th street was planned at St Mark’s for about 1810. This may have made continued use of the Jay Vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard impossible.

In 1804, Goldsboro Banyer, the infant son of Marie Jay Banyer died soon after childbirth and it was decided to have him buried in the East Meadow of the Rye Estate.This burial was followed by his father in 1806 and then young sister in 1808. The contents of the vault at St Mark’s was moved about 1806.

There is some question if there was one vault or two. AUGUSTE and his wife Anna Marie BAYARD may have been buried in the Stuyvesant vault. The cemetery in Rye was open to the descendants of Peter Jay so Auguste probably would not have been moved. It is also unclear where the Jay Vault was other than in the Stuyvesant Orchard near what is now St Mark’s in the Bowerie. It is also possible that the second vault was Peter and Mary from Fishkill.

Burials
Fourth Generation
Peter Jay MUNRO died at age 5 in 1797
Mary MUNRO died at age 6 in 1802

Third Generation
Anna Maricka Jay. Died in Rye in 1791
Margaret “Polly” Barclay. Died in NY in 1791. First wife of Fady Jay.
Frederick Jay died 1799 in NY
Augustus Jay. Died in Rye in 1801
Sarah Livingston Jay. Died in Bedford in 1802

Probable Burials
First Generation. Doubt they were moved
Augustus Jay. Died New Rochelle in March 1751
Anna Maria BAYARD died New Rochelle in Feb 1726

Second Generation Question if this was the second vault moved.
Peter Jay. Died in Poughkeepsie in 1783. Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck
Mary Van Courtlandt. Died in Fishkill 1777 Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck

History of JAY family in Manhattan

Part of our early JAY New York City history is the small area we lived in and how inter dependent we were of each other. It tracks the changes that happened on Manhattan Island as it grew from a small DUTCH colony to the huge American city of today. It also shows the relationships between the Jay, Styuvesant, Bayard, Clarkson, Van Courtlandt, Livingston, and de Peyster families and how marriages resulted in property changes.

AUGUSTUS JAY was the first Jay to come to this country, escaping Religious persecution in France. He first arrived in Charleston South Carolina and moved North settling in the DUTCH colony of what was then New Amsterdam. He was able to work under the wealthy Philipse family as a trader. In 1697 he married ANNA Maricka BAYARD. Her grandmother was Anna Styuvesant BAYARD, the sister of the then Governor Peter STYUVESANT. This was a very good marriage for Augustus!

In 1720 Auguste Jay obtained property in lower Manhatten on Broad St and Stone St. I believe from the BAYARD family. This was East of Broadway, below Wall St and South of Trinity Church. He lived there with his wife and children and I believe died there. His wife died a few years before him. I believe they both were buried in the Styuvesant Orchard near St Mark’s in the Bowery.

The name of Augustus occurs frequently in the city records, and some lots bought by him in 1712, on the northwest corner of Broad and Stone streets, are still held in the family. Here he erected a large two-story dwelling-house, with a front of Holland brick, with a courtyard paved with Bristol stones, and there he resided until his death, in 1780.

Peter Styuvesant who arrived as Dutch Governor in 1645 lived in the Governors Mansion near the tip of Manhattan. In 1651 he purchased the large tract of land above the Dutch colony for a farm that has become the Bowery of today. He built a house on what is now 11th Street between 2nd and 3rd Ave and built a chapel there. Under this he was buried and it was the start of the Styuvesant Vault. This became St Mark’s Church in the Bowerie, the oldest Episcopal Church in the City and still very active as part of the East Village.

Our connection to the Bowerie was through Peter Styuvesant’s sister ANNA who had come with her three children from Holland in 1647 to be near her brother after her first husband SAMUEL BAYARD had died in Holland. Her son Balthazar married Marietje Lookermans, also of a distinguished merchant family, and their daughter ANNA Maria married Augustus Jay.

This Bayard Styuvesant connection explains why the JAY Family vault was in the cemetery part of the Styuvesant Orchard, not at Trinity Church. ANNA Styuvesant BAYARD was buried with her brother and probably Baltahzar and Marietje BAYARD in the Styuvesant vault. ANNA Maria and AUGUSTUS Jay were probably the first to be buried in the Jay Vault.

AUGUSTUS and Ann Marie son PETER lived and worked in New York and was brought up in the house on Broad and Stone Street. He became a successful trader and married Mary Van COURTLANDT in 1728. This was also a very fortunate marriage. Mary Van COURTLANDT ‘s father was Mayor of the City, Jacobus Van CORTLANDT who was a descendant of Oloaf Van Courtland and the start of Van COURTLANDT Manor. His wife was Edie Philps DeVries, whose mother, Margaret Hardeboeck was the RICHEST woman in the colonies and a very active trader and purchaser of land.

From this marriage Van COURTLANDT land would add to the Jay property. Peter Jay was given the Dock Ward by the Van Courtlandt which is now 64 Pearl Street. Land in Bedford would later come to John Jay. (26 Pearl st would be owned by Gen Matthew Clarkson.)

Continue reading

St Mark’s and Jay Vault

Sharon and I spent part of this afternoon talking with Roger Walters at St Mark’s. He is very much involved in the churches past, but they have few records before the mid 1800’s! We both agreed that Anna Stuyvesant was our connection to St Mark’s. The Jay Vault was probably in the Stuyvesant Orchard which is now 11th Street, and this is the reason it was moved to Rye.

The church is charming, with a very active rector and growth. Service is in the round. Nice place to visit!

Addendum. I found a map from 1815 that shows St Mark’s on the corner of 11th St and second Ave with St Marks Cemetery across second Ave. The Cemetery has disappeared and that must have been where the Jay Family Vault was.

The JAY CEMETERY: The FAMILY PLOT: The Jay Vault at St Mark’s in the Bowerie

JAY-STUYVESANT Relationships.
EARLY JAY BURIALS: The Jay Vault

The Jay who first came to what was to become the United States was AUGUSTE in 1687. As a young man he had returned from an Asian tour on one of his fathers boats just after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes into the port of La Rochelle. His family had been forced to flee. He was saved by a half Huguenot/half Catholic Aunt and smuggled aboard a vessel bound for Charleston, South Carolina. He moved to New Amsterdam, settled as a trader and married ANNA MARIKA BAYARD in 1697.

Anna BAYARD’s paternal grandmother was ANNA STUYVESANT BAYARD, the sister of the early Mayor of New Amsterdam, PETER (Petrus) STUYVESANT. He had married Anna’s husband’s sister JUDITH BAYARD. Samuel BAYARD had died in Holland in 1646 and the next year Anna with her four children sailed to New Amsterdam to join her brother Peter. There was a strong connection between the BAYARD and  STUYVESANT family. Peter Stuyvesant had purchased for himself the area now called the Bowerie. His home and chapel where at third ave and 10th st. This family connection may be why a burial vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard at St Marks in the Bowerie became the resting place for JAY family members.

Anna Stuyvesant remarried but outlived her second husband. She died in 1683, ten years after her brother Peter. He had been buried in a vault under his family chapel in the Bowerie. This was to become the site of St Mark’s in the Bowerie church. She was buried in this vault. Her son Balthazar who died in 1705, was probably buried in the Stuyvesant vault but this is not documented. 

I am not sure when the decision to build the Jay Family vault in the garden near the chapel was made. Anna Stuyvesant BAYARD brought four children to New Amsterdam. Balthazar, Nicholas, Petrus, and Catherine. The  Question if this wtheoldest, Balthazar married in 1664, Marietje Lookermans. It was their daughter ANNA MARIE BAYARD who married AUGUSTE JAY in 1697. Anna Marie died in 1726 and was interred in a Vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard in the Bowerie. Her husband Auguste died in 1751 and was also buried in the “family” vault. I believe they were the first “JAYs” to be interred in the Stuyvesant garden. I am not sure what happened between 1750 and 1780. I have no record of burials.

During the Revolution, New York was occupied by English troops and no burials took place. PETER JAY, the only son of Auguste Jay and father of JOHN JAY, died in Pougkeepsie during this time and was buried in a vault owned by Gysbert Schenck near Fishkill with his wife MARY Van COURTLAND who had died a year before. The entire family had been forced to leave Rye during the revolution and stayed first in Fishkill and then in Poughkeepsie. 

After the Revolution the remaining  family moved back to the Rye house. In 1795 Jay became Governor of New York and moved in his second term to the new state Capitol in Albany. He retired from that post at the end of his second term to live in Bedford in 1801.

A Jay Family vault in the Stuyvesant garden was used during the period of 1780 and 1806. Children or wives of children of Peter and Mary were interred. In 1791 daughter Anna Marika Jay was buried. She with “blind” Peter were the two children blinded by small pox in their youth. In 1799 their youngest son Frederick Jay died. He was interred along with his first wife, Polly Barclay, who had died in 1791. Frederick had been involved in the care of the family during the period they had left Rye.  In 1801 Augustus Jay died. He was the son with a learning disability. Finally Sarah Livingston Jay, John Jay’s wife, died in 1802 and was interred in the family vault.

There were probable interments of children who died. This would include Jacobus (1731-1731) Frederick (1744-1744) and Mary (1749-1752). Also son Sir James Jay had a son Peter Augustus Jay that died in childhood. (1784-1786)

During this time the Stuyvesant property in the Bowerie underwent change. In 1793 the great grandson of Peter Stuyvesant, also Petrus, sold the family chapel and land to the Episcopal church for $1.00. A new church was designed and built on the same site as the family chapel. St Mark’s in the Bowerie was consecrated in 1799.

It was soon after that that the family decision was made to set aside a tract of land in the East Meadow on the Rye Estate as a burial plot. Changes were happening at St Mark’s which may have necessitated this. New York City was undergoing street planning grid changes and construction of 10th street was planned at St Mark’s for about 1810. The garden was going and the Jay Vault needed to be moved. Also all the other burial sites in the garden were moved. 

In 1804, Goldsboro Banyer, the infant son of Marie Jay Banyer died soon after childbirth and it was decided to have him buried in the East Meadow of the Rye Estate.This burial was followed by his father in 1806 and then young sister in 1808. The contents of the vault at St Mark’s was moved about 1806.

There is some question if there was one vault or two moved to Rye. AUGUSTE and his wife Anna Marie BAYARD may have been interred in a separate vault and children who died interred in this.  John Jay had declared the cemetery in Rye open to the descendants of his father, PETER JAY. Had Auguste and his wife been the original burials in a Jay Vault?  If so they would have been moved. Was there a second vault? This was moved. Were father Peter and Mary also moved to Rye from Gysbert Schenck vault? I can find no evidence for a vault from Gysbert Schenk in existence in the Fishkill area. It would seem that with the move of the contents of the Jay Vault from the Bowerie and the importance of the decendecy from Peter Jay to be eligible for cemetery burial that Peter and Mary  were also moved. 

Burials
Third Generation
Anna Maricka Jay. Died in Rye in 1791
Margaret “Polly” Barclay. Died in NY in 1791. First wife of Fady Jay.
Frederick Jay died 1799 in NY
Augustus Jay. Died in Rye in 1801
Sarah Livingston Jay. Died in Bedford in 1802

First Generation. Probably the first interments in the Stuyvesant garden.
Augustus Jay. Died New Rochelle in March 1751
Anna Maria BAYARD died New Rochelle in Feb 1726

Second Generation: Very likely moved.to Rye
Peter Jay. Died in Poughkeepsie in 1783. Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck
Mary Van Courtlandt. Died in Fishkill 1777 Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck.

Other
Eva Van COURTLANDT, infant daughter of Frederick Van COURTLANDT and Frances JAY, Peter Jay’s sister in 1733. She was born in 1732.

JAY-Van CORTLANDT relationships

JAY-Van CORTLAND relationships

Family intermarriage occurred among the early Families that settled in the New Amsterdam region. This was very apparent between the Jay Family and the Van Cortlandt Family.

The first Jay settler was Auguste,(1665-1751) who had been forced to leave France when he returned on one of his father’s ships to a post edict of Nantes France He was able to escape France with the help of an aunt and ended settling in New Amsterdam. He became a merchant and married Anne Marika Bayard, a descendant of Anna Stuyvesant. They had four children that survived infancy and married and had children. This becomes the basis of the Jay Family in what was to become the United States.

Judith Jay* married Cornelius Van Horne
Marie Jay married Pierre Vallete
Francina Jay* married Frederick Van Cortlandt*
Peter Jay** married Mary Van Cortlandt**

The Judith Jay and Cornelius Van Horne marriage produced two children who married: Cornelius and Augustus. Cornelius Van Horne married Elizabeth Van Norden. Descendants of her family were to purchase the Jay house and property in Rye in 1805. Augustus Van Horne married his first cousin, Anna Marie Van Cortland. She was the daughter of Frederick Van Cortlandt who married his aunt, Judith sister Francina Jay. They had one daughter Elizabeth who married Thomas Stratfield Clarkson. Their daughter Elizabeth Stratfield Clarkson married her cousin, the son of Uncle General Matthew Clarkson, Matthew. He married his cousin the youngest daughter of Peter Augustus Jay and his aunt Mary Rutherford Clarkson, a daughter of General Matthew Clarkson, Sarah Matilda Jay. They had one child Banyer who was one of the original trustees of the Jay Cemetery and with his wife is buried there. ??Confused?? See the chart!

Their second daughter Mary, married Pierre Vallete and no intermarriages occurred!

Their third daughter, Francina Jay, married the son of Jacobus and Eve Van Cortlandt, Frederick Van Courtlandt.

Their fourth child, a son, Peter Jay married the sister of Frederick, daughter of Jacobus and Eva VC, Mary Van Cortlandt. Peter Jay was a successful merchant in New York, who bought the property in Rye and moved the family there in 1745. It is this family that we are most interested in.

The first Van Cortlandt settler was Oloff (1600-1684) His second
son Jacobus (1658-1739) who in 1700 was Mayor of the City of New York, married Eve Phillipse. They had four children, three daughters and one son. Their family became intertwined with the Jay Family with marriage of their son Frederick to Francina Jay and their daughter Mary to her brother Peter.

Margareta Van Cortland* married Abraham de Peyster
Frederick Van Cortlandt* married Francina Jay*
Anne Van Cortlandt married John Chambers
Mary Van Cortlandt* married Peter Jay*

Margareta Van Cortlandt and Abraham de Peyster had six children. Their oldest daughter Catherine married John Livingston, the brother of William Livingston, the father of Sarah Livingston Jay, the wife of John Jay.

Frederick Van Cortland married Francina Jay and lived in the Van Cortland House in Yonkers. (This has become the area in the Bronx, Van Cortland Park) They had five children, two daughters and two sons who married and had children.

James Van Cortlandt married Elizabeth Culyer
Augustus Van Cortland married Helen Barclay. Their daughter Helen married James Morris whose son Augustus married Harriet Munro.
Anna Marie Van Cortlandt* married Augustus Van Horne* her first cousin. Their mothers, Francina Jay and Judith Jay were sisters. They had one daughter who married Thomas Stratfield Clarkson as outlined above.
Eva Van Cortlandt* married Henry White. They had one daughter, Margaret White* who married her cousin Peter Jay Munro.* the only child of Eve Jay and Henry Munro. They had nine children that survived infancy. Two of their children had inter family marriages between Jay and Van Cortland descendants.

Anne Van Cortland married Judge John Chambers. She was close to Eve Jay, and introduced her to Harry Munro at Trinity Church where he was a guest preacher.

Mary Van Cortlandt* married Peter Jay* and they had seven children. As noted they bought the property in Rye NY and moved the family there in 1745.

Eve Jay married Henry Munro and had one child Peter Jay Munro. As mentioned Peter married his cousin Margaret White and had nine children. Two of these children, Harriet and Henry married into the Van Cortlandt family.
Harriet Munro married Augustus Frederick Morris. His father was James Morris and his mother was Helen Van Cortlandt, the daughter of Augustus Van Cortlandt. Augustus Morris changed his name to his mothers Van Cortlandt. Their children were all named Van Cortlandt.
Henry Munro married Anne Bayley. Their daughter Mary White Munro married James Bruen. They had several children.
Augustus Jay
Sir James Jay with Anne Erwin
Peter “blind” Jay
Anna Marika Jay (blind)
John Jay married Sarah VanBrugh Livingston, the daughter of Gov William Livingston and Susana French. They had six children. John Jay was involved in several branches of Government during his life and was a Founding Father of the United States. His oldest son, Peter Augustus married into the Clarkson Family. His wife, Mary Rutherford Clarkaon, father was General Matthew Clarkson. Peter Augustus and Mary youngest daughter Sarah Matilda Jay married cousin Matthew Clarkson, son of the General.
Frederick Jay married twice but had no children.

The Revolution and Frederick Jay

Birth 19 Apr 1747 in New York City, New York
Death 14 Dec 1799 in New York City

FADY JAY, the youngest child of Peter Jay and Mary Van Courtland Jay, was born two years after the birth of hIs older brother John.

FREDERICK JAY(pj3/9), Peter and Mary Jay’s ninth child, was born and raised on the Rye farm. He followed his father’s profession and became a merchant. His first marriage was to Margaret Barclay, whose father was rector of St Peters church in Albany. She descended from the De Lancey family who were the political opposing group to the Livingston’s, and in New York were opposed to the Revolutionary movement. Frederick (Fady) was locally active during the time of the revolution. He served on the Committee for Safety for Rye, and was a member of the New York Battalion of Independent Foot Companies, known as “The Corsicans”. From 1777 to 1783 he was a member of the Assembly from New York. During the Revolution, when Rye was “no man’s land” he moved his parents and family from Rye to Fishkill to stay with him. His first wife died in 1791 after he had returned to New York. They had no children. He remarried the niece of brother “Blind” Peters wife Euphemia Dunscomb. He was probably buried in the family plot in the Bowery.

There is less information on his life than the other children. He played a leading family role during the Revolution period 1776 to 1783, when he became responsible for his mother and father and older sisters and brothers when Rye became very dangerous for them to live in and he needed to move them to a safer spot. His older brother John at this time was with his wife Sarah in Spain. Their oldest son Peter Augustus had been left with both Livingston and Jay grandparents.

Frederick Jay (1747–1799), the younger brother of John Jay, served a mercantile apprenticeship to his cousin James Abraham De Peyster, a New York city merchant, including a stint as De Peyster’s agent in the Dutch East Indies. After further experience in trade in Curaçao, he opened a mercantile firm in New York in 1773.

Before the Revolution he had been trained as a merchant and first worked in New York City with his cousin, and then in 1773 opened his own company. It was also in 1773 that he married Margaret (Polly) Barclay.

. His first marriage was to Margaret Barclay, whose father was rector of St Peters church in Albany. She descended from the De Lancey family who were the political opposing group to the Livingston’s, and in New York were opposed to the Revolutionary movement. Frederick (Fady) was locally active during the time of the revolution. He served on the Committee for Safety for Rye, and was a member of the New York Battalion of Independent Foot Companies, known as “The Corsicans”. From 1777 to 1783 he was a member of the Assembly from New York
New York City was captured by the British in 1777 and he and his wife were forced to leave. In a letter to his brother John in 1777 sent from Fishkill, he talks about being in Kent, CT to find a place for the family. John and Sarah had just had their first child Peter Augustus Jay that would be left with his grandparents while the Jay’s were sent to Spain and then Paris.

Fish Kill, 18th July, 1777. Dear John: Both your letters are come to hand—I have been to Kent & provided Accommodations for the Family in case of a retreat. I have done every thing in my power to get your Books removed, but in vain; not a waggon or Cart to be hired at any rate, the People here being busy in their Harvests. [148] I shall speak to Coll. Hughes to day for two Continental teams; if he has them, I make no doubt he ’ll be ready to assist us.—The peas are not yet come to hand. The Family as usual, except Peggy who has been ill with a fever ever since you left us, which is the reason of my not writing to you sooner. Genl. Sullivan with 2000 Continental Troops are now encamped in the Town of Fishkill; this affair makes the old Gentleman imagine that the Enemy will certainly attempt the River. I could wish he was as easy about the matter as myself—Mr. Platt of Kent informs me that there is a Farm of about 160 Acres with a Comfortable House to be sold near him for about £700, Lawful [money]. Would it not be better to purchase it than have the family in different houses; had I the money of my own, the farm should be mine. The old Gentleman I believe would soon come into the measure if you was to give him only a hint about it. I am Your Afft. Brother Fred Jay.

Fishkill was chosen as the initial place for the family to escape to and they were given room in the house owned by Theodore Van Wyck. In a letter to John he expresses his dismay at being then forced to move to Kent and very worried about the cost of such a move.

Fish Kill, 29 July, 1777. Dear Johnny, I have received your letter of the 21 Inst:—The evacuation of Ticonderoga is very alarming; I wish it may soon be made to appear in a less gloomy light. [157] Hitherto Fady has not been able to succeed in providing waggons to remove your Books to Kent.—My thoughts have been much imployed of late about removing from hence in case of need, but the more I consider of it the more I am perplexd., for my present state of health admits of my undergoing no fatigue. Besides I conceive my going to Kent will be attended with an immense expence, for there I can hire no Farm to raise necessarys for my numerous Family, but must lodge them in different Houses and buy daily food &c for them, I suppose at the same exorbitant rate that is extorted from the distressed in other parts of the Country; so that unless I can get a Farm in order to raise so much as will in some measure answer the expence of the Necessarys of life, I am very apprehensive it will have too great a tendency to our ruin, for we may long continue in our present distressed situation before a Peace takes place. I am indeed at a loss what steps to take and therefore I could wish you were nearer at hand to consult with you and Fady what to do. Hitherto my present abode appears to me as safe as elsewhere, and it may be most prudent to continue here till we know what rout the Regulars take & their success if any they have; but in the mean time it may be best to remove some of my most valuable things by way of precaution, which we’ll consider of when you come here. If we can purchase another Waggon it shall be done. Johnny Strang was here about a fortnight or three weeks ago when we was expectg. the Regulars were about coming up the River; he then proposed to send a box or two he has of yours at his Father’s to Salem, and promised to remove them from there in case of need & said he would be very careful of them. Nancy is now unwell & Peggy is very sick with an intermitting fever ever since her return from Albany. I am yr. affecte. Father Peter Jay.

They all stayed with Theodorus almost two years in his house near Fishkill.

Notes from Van Voorhis Book: _Born 1702_ _Lived in the old stone house down the lane at Swartoutville._ _Col. John Brinckerhoff. A promiment [sic] citizen of the colonies prior to the Revolution. He joined the American Army. A soldier & a patriot. He was the intimate friend of General Washington. His confidential adviser during the dark days of the War for Independence. His home was the head‑quarters of Gen Washington. Who spent a night & day there in secret correspondence with Comt_ Rochambeau the French minister. The time of the anxiety respecting the arrest of Major Andre. As soon as the darkness of the second night shielded them from observation; they departed upon horses. Through the Highlands. in time to arrest the ‑‑British Spy The Brinckerhoff house erected 1738. Was torn down.
Dr. Doros Van Wyck made it his home with his father-in-law, Co., John Brinckerhoff.During the Revolution, it was occupied jointly with the Jay family, including the distinguished partriot, Governor and Chief Justice John Jay. It was from this home that John Jay set off on his mission to France to aid in negotiating the Treaty of Peace with England.

It is hard to recognize now how difficult their life must have been. The revolt against England created extreme contrasts in living in the East. For those supportive of the Revolution, New York City had become dangerous for their lives. Fady had a growing merchant business which had to be left. Rye was in between the patriots and revolutionaries. Gangs of “Cowboys” and “Skinners” prowled the area and stole pillaged and burned whatever they wanted. The stable farm of Peter Jay had become an unsafe area to be in, and the provisions from the farm would end. Meanwhile the Revolution was on. The British had badly defeated the American forces on Brooklyn and had taken control of New York City. They had ships in the river and were on the verge of taking control of the Hudson from New York to Albany. Washington was fighting with a rag time untrained group. His basic strategy soon became to run and try and win fast battles. The dependency on British currency had ended and a new system of Banking was long off. Luckily for the Jays the troops and battles moved South and the military connection between New York and Albany did not happen. Also the large British force moving down Lake Champlain toward Albany died in Saratoga.

Fishkill was reasonably safe, in fact for a period it was the Capitol of New York State. What Fady was doing during this time we have little information. He unlike his brother wrote few letters, which JJ complained about.

Theodorus VanWyck had married the widow of Petrus Du Bois, my GGG Grandfather, Mary Coert Voorhes (Du Bois). I am descended from the youngest child of Petrus and Mary, Cornelius who moved to New York City and became a very successful merchant.

Mary Van Courtland Jay was very ill at the time of the move from Rye and she died in Fishkill in 1777. She was buried in the vault of Gysbert Schneck. In April of 1781 the family were robbed of all their possessions from the Fishkill house. This event was very disconcerting to father Peter and because of it Faddy decided to move the family to Poughkeepsie. It was in Poughkeepsie in 1782 that father Peter Jay died and he was also interred in the vault of Gysbert Schneck. We are still looking for the location of this vault!!

With the death of Peter, “Blind” Peter inherited the Rye house. It must have been soon after this that the family decided they could leave Poughkeepsie and move back to Rye. By 1783 the British had left New York City and it had become the Capitol of the new Union.
At the time of his father’s death in 1782 he inherited the Rye property. He lived in the house with his “retarded” older brother Augustus, his sister Eve Munro and her small child, and his blind sister Anna Maricka. To help him with the care of this family a happy marriage was arranged with Mary Duyckinck in 1789, when he was 55 and she was 53 years old. She was descended from a noted portrait painter and apparently was the original of the “aunt” in the spy story written by George Fenimore Cooper. In fact she was referred to as “Aunt Jay” in Coopers letters.

Eve Jay Munro, after the Revolution left Albany and moved with her son Peter Jay Munro back to Rye and lived with Peter et al. She was difficult for the family and John and Sarah took over the care of her son. He became a successful lawyer in New York.

John and Sarah Jay had moved back to New York City. He had inherited land from his mother’s family in Katonah which became the site of his retirement home into which they moved in 1803 when he had ended his second term as Governor. In 1783 he was Secretary for Foreign Affairs and in 1789 became the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. In 1795 he was elected Governor of the State of New York and moved to the Governors House in NYC and then in his second term moved to Albany.

Fady and his wife Polly Barclay also moved back to New York City. At the time of his fathers death Fady had inherited property in East Bay and they probably lived at 64 Pearl Street.

The house and lot of Peter Jay in “Dock Ward” is now No. 64 Pearl street. This was given by Jacobus Van Cortlandt, in his will, to his daughter Mary, who married Peter Jay. This was a water lot, which was extended by later grants from the city. The part left to Frederick Jay was south of Front street. —

Polly died in 1791 suddenly of a “stroke”. Her unanticipated death was very sudden and a matter of concern to all. Sir James had been sent for but arrived after she had died. In 1794 he married Euphame Dunscomb, the first cousin of his brother Peters wife. Letters from Sarah Jay show that this was not an “approved” marriage! Fady died in 1799 at age 52 and was probably buried in the family vault. His second wife lived until 1817 and was buried in the Jay Cemetery.