Why the Bowerie? Our Stuyvesant Relationship

JAY-STUYVESANT Relationships.
EARLY JAY BURIALS: The Jay Vault

The Jay who first came to what was to become the United States was AUGUSTE in 1687. As a young man he had returned from an Asian tour on one of his fathers boats just after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes into the port of La Rochelle. His family had been forced to flee. He was saved by a half Huguenot/half Catholic Aunt and smuggled aboard a vessel bound for Charleston, South Carolina. He moved to New Amsterdam and settled as a trader and married ANNA MARIKA BAYARD in 1697.

Anna BAYARD’s paternal grandmother was ANNA STUYVESANT, the sister of the early leader of New Amsterdam, PETER (Petrus) STUYVESANT. He had married Anna’s husband, SAMUEL BAYARD, sister JUDITH BAYARD. Samuel BAYARD had died in Holland in 1646 and the next year Anna with her four children sailed to New Amsterdam to join her brother Peter. There was a strong connection with the Stuyvesant family which may be why a burial vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard at St Marks in the Bowerie became the resting place for JAY family members until it was moved to Rye in 1807.

Anna Stuyvesant remarried but outlived her second husband. She died in 1683, ten years after her brother Peter who had been buried in a vault under the family chapel in the Stuyvesant orchard in the Bowerie. This was to become the site of St Mark’s in the Bowerie church. She probably was buried in this vault.

This may have been the start of the Jay Family vault. Anna Stuyvesant BAYARD brought four children to New Amsterdam. Balthazar, Nicholas, Petrus, and Catherine. The oldest, Balthazar married in 1664, Marietje Lookermans. It was their daughter ANNA MARIE BAYARD who married AUGUSTE JAY in 1697. Anna Marie died in 1726 and was interred in the Vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard in the Bowerie. Her husband Auguste died in 1751 and was also buried in the “family” vault. I believe they were the first “JAYs” to be interred in the St Marks vault.

During the Revolution, New York was occupied by English troops and no burials took place. The son of Auguste Jay and father of John Jay, Peter and his wife Mary Van COURTLANDT died in Fishkill and Pougkeepsie during this time and were buried in a vault near Fishkill.

After the Revolution John and Sarah Livingston moved back to New York and were involved with Trinity Church about 1784. Also their oldest son Peter Augustus went to Trinity. In 1795 Jay became Governor of New York and moved in his second term to the new state Capitol in Albany. He retired from that post at the end of his second term to live in Bedford in 1801.

There were several Jay burials during the period of 1780 and 1806. Three children of Peter and Mary Van Courtland were buried. In 1791 Anna Marika Jay was buried. She with Peter were the two children blinded by small pox in their youth. In 1799 Frederick Jay died. He was probably buried here along with his first wife who had died in 1791. In 1801 Augustus Jay died and was buried. He was the son with a learning disability. Finally Sarah Livingston Jay, John Jay’s wife, died in 1802 and was buried in the family vault.

During this time the Stuyvesant property in the Bowerie underwent change. In 1793 the great grandson of Peter Stuyvesant, also Petrus, sold the family chapel and land to the Episcopal church for $1.00. A new church was designed and built on the same site as the family chapel. St Mark’s in the Bowerie was consecrated in 1799.

It was soon after that, that the family decision was made to set aside a tract of land in the East Meadow on the Rye Estate as a burial plot. Changes were happening at St Mark’s which may have necessitated this. New York City was undergoing street planning grid changes and construction of 10th street was planned at St Mark’s for about 1810. This may have made continued use of the Jay Vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard impossible.

In 1804, Goldsboro Banyer, the infant son of Marie Jay Banyer died soon after childbirth and it was decided to have him buried in the East Meadow of the Rye Estate.This burial was followed by his father in 1806 and then young sister in 1808. The contents of the vault at St Mark’s was moved about 1806.

There is some question if there was one vault or two. AUGUSTE and his wife Anna Marie BAYARD may have been buried in the Stuyvesant vault. The cemetery in Rye was open to the descendants of Peter Jay so Auguste probably would not have been moved. It is also unclear where the Jay Vault was other than in the Stuyvesant Orchard near what is now St Mark’s in the Bowerie. It is also possible that the second vault was Peter and Mary from Fishkill.

Burials
Fourth Generation
Peter Jay MUNRO died at age 5 in 1797
Mary MUNRO died at age 6 in 1802

Third Generation
Anna Maricka Jay. Died in Rye in 1791
Margaret “Polly” Barclay. Died in NY in 1791. First wife of Fady Jay.
Frederick Jay died 1799 in NY
Augustus Jay. Died in Rye in 1801
Sarah Livingston Jay. Died in Bedford in 1802

Probable Burials
First Generation. Doubt they were moved
Augustus Jay. Died New Rochelle in March 1751
Anna Maria BAYARD died New Rochelle in Feb 1726

Second Generation Question if this was the second vault moved.
Peter Jay. Died in Poughkeepsie in 1783. Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck
Mary Van Courtlandt. Died in Fishkill 1777 Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck

History of JAY family in Manhattan

Part of our early JAY New York City history is the small area we lived in and how inter dependent we were of each other. It tracks the changes that happened on Manhattan Island as it grew from a small DUTCH colony to the huge American city of today. It also shows the relationships between the Jay, Styuvesant, Bayard, Clarkson, Van Courtlandt, Livingston, and de Peyster families and how marriages resulted in property changes.

AUGUSTUS JAY was the first Jay to come to this country, escaping Religious persecution in France. He first arrived in Charleston South Carolina and moved North settling in the DUTCH colony of what was then New Amsterdam. He was able to work under the wealthy Philipse family as a trader. In 1697 he married ANNA Maricka BAYARD. Her grandmother was Anna Styuvesant BAYARD, the sister of the then Governor Peter STYUVESANT. This was a very good marriage for Augustus!

In 1720 Auguste Jay obtained property in lower Manhatten on Broad St and Stone St. I believe from the BAYARD family. This was East of Broadway, below Wall St and South of Trinity Church. He lived there with his wife and children and I believe died there. His wife died a few years before him. I believe they both were buried in the Styuvesant Orchard near St Mark’s in the Bowery.

The name of Augustus occurs frequently in the city records, and some lots bought by him in 1712, on the northwest corner of Broad and Stone streets, are still held in the family. Here he erected a large two-story dwelling-house, with a front of Holland brick, with a courtyard paved with Bristol stones, and there he resided until his death, in 1780.

Peter Styuvesant who arrived as Dutch Governor in 1645 lived in the Governors Mansion near the tip of Manhattan. In 1651 he purchased the large tract of land above the Dutch colony for a farm that has become the Bowery of today. He built a house on what is now 11th Street between 2nd and 3rd Ave and built a chapel there. Under this he was buried and it was the start of the Styuvesant Vault. This became St Mark’s Church in the Bowerie, the oldest Episcopal Church in the City and still very active as part of the East Village.

Our connection to the Bowerie was through Peter Styuvesant’s sister ANNA who had come with her three children from Holland in 1647 to be near her brother after her first husband SAMUEL BAYARD had died in Holland. Her son Balthazar married Marietje Lookermans, also of a distinguished merchant family, and their daughter ANNA Maria married Augustus Jay.

This Bayard Styuvesant connection explains why the JAY Family vault was in the cemetery part of the Styuvesant Orchard, not at Trinity Church. ANNA Styuvesant BAYARD was buried with her brother and probably Baltahzar and Marietje BAYARD in the Styuvesant vault. ANNA Maria and AUGUSTUS Jay were probably the first to be buried in the Jay Vault.

AUGUSTUS and Ann Marie son PETER lived and worked in New York and was brought up in the house on Broad and Stone Street. He became a successful trader and married Mary Van COURTLANDT in 1728. This was also a very fortunate marriage. Mary Van COURTLANDT ‘s father was Mayor of the City, Jacobus Van CORTLANDT who was a descendant of Oloaf Van Courtland and the start of Van COURTLANDT Manor. His wife was Edie Philps DeVries, whose mother, Margaret Hardeboeck was the RICHEST woman in the colonies and a very active trader and purchaser of land.

From this marriage Van COURTLANDT land would add to the Jay property. Peter Jay was given the Dock Ward by the Van Courtlandt which is now 64 Pearl Street. Land in Bedford would later come to John Jay. (26 Pearl st would be owned by Gen Matthew Clarkson.)

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St Mark’s and Jay Vault

Sharon and I spent part of this afternoon talking with Roger Walters at St Mark’s. He is very much involved in the churches past, but they have few records before the mid 1800’s! We both agreed that Anna Stuyvesant was our connection to St Mark’s. The Jay Vault was probably in the Stuyvesant Orchard which is now 11th Street, and this is the reason it was moved to Rye.

The church is charming, with a very active rector and growth. Service is in the round. Nice place to visit!

Addendum. I found a map from 1815 that shows St Mark’s on the corner of 11th St and second Ave with St Marks Cemetery across second Ave. The Cemetery has disappeared and that must have been where the Jay Family Vault was.

The JAY CEMETERY: The FAMILY PLOT: The Jay Vault at St Mark’s in the Bowerie

JAY-STUYVESANT Relationships.
EARLY JAY BURIALS: The Jay Vault

The Jay who first came to what was to become the United States was AUGUSTE in 1687. As a young man he had returned from an Asian tour on one of his fathers boats just after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes into the port of La Rochelle. His family had been forced to flee. He was saved by a half Huguenot/half Catholic Aunt and smuggled aboard a vessel bound for Charleston, South Carolina. He moved to New Amsterdam, settled as a trader and married ANNA MARIKA BAYARD in 1697.

Anna BAYARD’s paternal grandmother was ANNA STUYVESANT BAYARD, the sister of the early Mayor of New Amsterdam, PETER (Petrus) STUYVESANT. He had married Anna’s husband’s sister JUDITH BAYARD. Samuel BAYARD had died in Holland in 1646 and the next year Anna with her four children sailed to New Amsterdam to join her brother Peter. There was a strong connection between the BAYARD and  STUYVESANT family. Peter Stuyvesant had purchased for himself the area now called the Bowerie. His home and chapel where at third ave and 10th st. This family connection may be why a burial vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard at St Marks in the Bowerie became the resting place for JAY family members.

Anna Stuyvesant remarried but outlived her second husband. She died in 1683, ten years after her brother Peter. He had been buried in a vault under his family chapel in the Bowerie. This was to become the site of St Mark’s in the Bowerie church. She was buried in this vault. Her son Balthazar who died in 1705, was probably buried in the Stuyvesant vault but this is not documented. 

I am not sure when the decision to build the Jay Family vault in the garden near the chapel was made. Anna Stuyvesant BAYARD brought four children to New Amsterdam. Balthazar, Nicholas, Petrus, and Catherine. The  Question if this wtheoldest, Balthazar married in 1664, Marietje Lookermans. It was their daughter ANNA MARIE BAYARD who married AUGUSTE JAY in 1697. Anna Marie died in 1726 and was interred in a Vault in the Stuyvesant Orchard in the Bowerie. Her husband Auguste died in 1751 and was also buried in the “family” vault. I believe they were the first “JAYs” to be interred in the Stuyvesant garden. I am not sure what happened between 1750 and 1780. I have no record of burials.

During the Revolution, New York was occupied by English troops and no burials took place. PETER JAY, the only son of Auguste Jay and father of JOHN JAY, died in Pougkeepsie during this time and was buried in a vault owned by Gysbert Schenck near Fishkill with his wife MARY Van COURTLAND who had died a year before. The entire family had been forced to leave Rye during the revolution and stayed first in Fishkill and then in Poughkeepsie. 

After the Revolution the remaining  family moved back to the Rye house. In 1795 Jay became Governor of New York and moved in his second term to the new state Capitol in Albany. He retired from that post at the end of his second term to live in Bedford in 1801.

A Jay Family vault in the Stuyvesant garden was used during the period of 1780 and 1806. Children or wives of children of Peter and Mary were interred. In 1791 daughter Anna Marika Jay was buried. She with “blind” Peter were the two children blinded by small pox in their youth. In 1799 their youngest son Frederick Jay died. He was interred along with his first wife, Polly Barclay, who had died in 1791. Frederick had been involved in the care of the family during the period they had left Rye.  In 1801 Augustus Jay died. He was the son with a learning disability. Finally Sarah Livingston Jay, John Jay’s wife, died in 1802 and was interred in the family vault.

There were probable interments of children who died. This would include Jacobus (1731-1731) Frederick (1744-1744) and Mary (1749-1752). Also son Sir James Jay had a son Peter Augustus Jay that died in childhood. (1784-1786)

During this time the Stuyvesant property in the Bowerie underwent change. In 1793 the great grandson of Peter Stuyvesant, also Petrus, sold the family chapel and land to the Episcopal church for $1.00. A new church was designed and built on the same site as the family chapel. St Mark’s in the Bowerie was consecrated in 1799.

It was soon after that that the family decision was made to set aside a tract of land in the East Meadow on the Rye Estate as a burial plot. Changes were happening at St Mark’s which may have necessitated this. New York City was undergoing street planning grid changes and construction of 10th street was planned at St Mark’s for about 1810. The garden was going and the Jay Vault needed to be moved. Also all the other burial sites in the garden were moved. 

In 1804, Goldsboro Banyer, the infant son of Marie Jay Banyer died soon after childbirth and it was decided to have him buried in the East Meadow of the Rye Estate.This burial was followed by his father in 1806 and then young sister in 1808. The contents of the vault at St Mark’s was moved about 1806.

There is some question if there was one vault or two moved to Rye. AUGUSTE and his wife Anna Marie BAYARD may have been interred in a separate vault and children who died interred in this.  John Jay had declared the cemetery in Rye open to the descendants of his father, PETER JAY. Had Auguste and his wife been the original burials in a Jay Vault?  If so they would have been moved. Was there a second vault? This was moved. Were father Peter and Mary also moved to Rye from Gysbert Schenck vault? I can find no evidence for a vault from Gysbert Schenk in existence in the Fishkill area. It would seem that with the move of the contents of the Jay Vault from the Bowerie and the importance of the decendecy from Peter Jay to be eligible for cemetery burial that Peter and Mary  were also moved. 

Burials
Third Generation
Anna Maricka Jay. Died in Rye in 1791
Margaret “Polly” Barclay. Died in NY in 1791. First wife of Fady Jay.
Frederick Jay died 1799 in NY
Augustus Jay. Died in Rye in 1801
Sarah Livingston Jay. Died in Bedford in 1802

First Generation. Probably the first interments in the Stuyvesant garden.
Augustus Jay. Died New Rochelle in March 1751
Anna Maria BAYARD died New Rochelle in Feb 1726

Second Generation: Very likely moved.to Rye
Peter Jay. Died in Poughkeepsie in 1783. Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck
Mary Van Courtlandt. Died in Fishkill 1777 Buried in vault of Gysbert Schneck.

Other
Eva Van COURTLANDT, infant daughter of Frederick Van COURTLANDT and Frances JAY, Peter Jay’s sister in 1733. She was born in 1732.

JAY-Van CORTLANDT relationships

JAY-Van CORTLAND relationships

Family intermarriage occurred among the early Families that settled in the New Amsterdam region. This was very apparent between the Jay Family and the Van Cortlandt Family.

The first Jay settler was Auguste,(1665-1751) who had been forced to leave France when he returned on one of his father’s ships to a post edict of Nantes France He was able to escape France with the help of an aunt and ended settling in New Amsterdam. He became a merchant and married Anne Marika Bayard, a descendant of Anna Stuyvesant. They had four children that survived infancy and married and had children. This becomes the basis of the Jay Family in what was to become the United States.

Judith Jay* married Cornelius Van Horne
Marie Jay married Pierre Vallete
Francina Jay* married Frederick Van Cortlandt*
Peter Jay** married Mary Van Cortlandt**

The Judith Jay and Cornelius Van Horne marriage produced two children who married: Cornelius and Augustus. Cornelius Van Horne married Elizabeth Van Norden. Descendants of her family were to purchase the Jay house and property in Rye in 1805. Augustus Van Horne married his first cousin, Anna Marie Van Cortland. She was the daughter of Frederick Van Cortlandt who married his aunt, Judith sister Francina Jay. They had one daughter Elizabeth who married Thomas Stratfield Clarkson. Their daughter Elizabeth Stratfield Clarkson married her cousin, the son of Uncle General Matthew Clarkson, Matthew. He married his cousin the youngest daughter of Peter Augustus Jay and his aunt Mary Rutherford Clarkson, a daughter of General Matthew Clarkson, Sarah Matilda Jay. They had one child Banyer who was one of the original trustees of the Jay Cemetery and with his wife is buried there. ??Confused?? See the chart!

Their second daughter Mary, married Pierre Vallete and no intermarriages occurred!

Their third daughter, Francina Jay, married the son of Jacobus and Eve Van Cortlandt, Frederick Van Courtlandt.

Their fourth child, a son, Peter Jay married the sister of Frederick, daughter of Jacobus and Eva VC, Mary Van Cortlandt. Peter Jay was a successful merchant in New York, who bought the property in Rye and moved the family there in 1745. It is this family that we are most interested in.

The first Van Cortlandt settler was Oloff (1600-1684) His second
son Jacobus (1658-1739) who in 1700 was Mayor of the City of New York, married Eve Phillipse. They had four children, three daughters and one son. Their family became intertwined with the Jay Family with marriage of their son Frederick to Francina Jay and their daughter Mary to her brother Peter.

Margareta Van Cortland* married Abraham de Peyster
Frederick Van Cortlandt* married Francina Jay*
Anne Van Cortlandt married John Chambers
Mary Van Cortlandt* married Peter Jay*

Margareta Van Cortlandt and Abraham de Peyster had six children. Their oldest daughter Catherine married John Livingston, the brother of William Livingston, the father of Sarah Livingston Jay, the wife of John Jay.

Frederick Van Cortland married Francina Jay and lived in the Van Cortland House in Yonkers. (This has become the area in the Bronx, Van Cortland Park) They had five children, two daughters and two sons who married and had children.

James Van Cortlandt married Elizabeth Culyer
Augustus Van Cortland married Helen Barclay. Their daughter Helen married James Morris whose son Augustus married Harriet Munro.
Anna Marie Van Cortlandt* married Augustus Van Horne* her first cousin. Their mothers, Francina Jay and Judith Jay were sisters. They had one daughter who married Thomas Stratfield Clarkson as outlined above.
Eva Van Cortlandt* married Henry White. They had one daughter, Margaret White* who married her cousin Peter Jay Munro.* the only child of Eve Jay and Henry Munro. They had nine children that survived infancy. Two of their children had inter family marriages between Jay and Van Cortland descendants.

Anne Van Cortland married Judge John Chambers. She was close to Eve Jay, and introduced her to Harry Munro at Trinity Church where he was a guest preacher.

Mary Van Cortlandt* married Peter Jay* and they had seven children. As noted they bought the property in Rye NY and moved the family there in 1745.

Eve Jay married Henry Munro and had one child Peter Jay Munro. As mentioned Peter married his cousin Margaret White and had nine children. Two of these children, Harriet and Henry married into the Van Cortlandt family.
Harriet Munro married Augustus Frederick Morris. His father was James Morris and his mother was Helen Van Cortlandt, the daughter of Augustus Van Cortlandt. Augustus Morris changed his name to his mothers Van Cortlandt. Their children were all named Van Cortlandt.
Henry Munro married Anne Bayley. Their daughter Mary White Munro married James Bruen. They had several children.
Augustus Jay
Sir James Jay with Anne Erwin
Peter “blind” Jay
Anna Marika Jay (blind)
John Jay married Sarah VanBrugh Livingston, the daughter of Gov William Livingston and Susana French. They had six children. John Jay was involved in several branches of Government during his life and was a Founding Father of the United States. His oldest son, Peter Augustus married into the Clarkson Family. His wife, Mary Rutherford Clarkaon, father was General Matthew Clarkson. Peter Augustus and Mary youngest daughter Sarah Matilda Jay married cousin Matthew Clarkson, son of the General.
Frederick Jay married twice but had no children.

The Revolution and Frederick Jay

Birth 19 Apr 1747 in New York City, New York
Death 14 Dec 1799 in New York City

FADY JAY, the youngest child of Peter Jay and Mary Van Courtland Jay, was born two years after the birth of hIs older brother John.

FREDERICK JAY(pj3/9), Peter and Mary Jay’s ninth child, was born and raised on the Rye farm. He followed his father’s profession and became a merchant. His first marriage was to Margaret Barclay, whose father was rector of St Peters church in Albany. She descended from the De Lancey family who were the political opposing group to the Livingston’s, and in New York were opposed to the Revolutionary movement. Frederick (Fady) was locally active during the time of the revolution. He served on the Committee for Safety for Rye, and was a member of the New York Battalion of Independent Foot Companies, known as “The Corsicans”. From 1777 to 1783 he was a member of the Assembly from New York. During the Revolution, when Rye was “no man’s land” he moved his parents and family from Rye to Fishkill to stay with him. His first wife died in 1791 after he had returned to New York. They had no children. He remarried the niece of brother “Blind” Peters wife Euphemia Dunscomb. He was probably buried in the family plot in the Bowery.

There is less information on his life than the other children. He played a leading family role during the Revolution period 1776 to 1783, when he became responsible for his mother and father and older sisters and brothers when Rye became very dangerous for them to live in and he needed to move them to a safer spot. His older brother John at this time was with his wife Sarah in Spain. Their oldest son Peter Augustus had been left with both Livingston and Jay grandparents.

Frederick Jay (1747–1799), the younger brother of John Jay, served a mercantile apprenticeship to his cousin James Abraham De Peyster, a New York city merchant, including a stint as De Peyster’s agent in the Dutch East Indies. After further experience in trade in Curaçao, he opened a mercantile firm in New York in 1773.

Before the Revolution he had been trained as a merchant and first worked in New York City with his cousin, and then in 1773 opened his own company. It was also in 1773 that he married Margaret (Polly) Barclay.

. His first marriage was to Margaret Barclay, whose father was rector of St Peters church in Albany. She descended from the De Lancey family who were the political opposing group to the Livingston’s, and in New York were opposed to the Revolutionary movement. Frederick (Fady) was locally active during the time of the revolution. He served on the Committee for Safety for Rye, and was a member of the New York Battalion of Independent Foot Companies, known as “The Corsicans”. From 1777 to 1783 he was a member of the Assembly from New York
New York City was captured by the British in 1777 and he and his wife were forced to leave. In a letter to his brother John in 1777 sent from Fishkill, he talks about being in Kent, CT to find a place for the family. John and Sarah had just had their first child Peter Augustus Jay that would be left with his grandparents while the Jay’s were sent to Spain and then Paris.

Fish Kill, 18th July, 1777. Dear John: Both your letters are come to hand—I have been to Kent & provided Accommodations for the Family in case of a retreat. I have done every thing in my power to get your Books removed, but in vain; not a waggon or Cart to be hired at any rate, the People here being busy in their Harvests. [148] I shall speak to Coll. Hughes to day for two Continental teams; if he has them, I make no doubt he ’ll be ready to assist us.—The peas are not yet come to hand. The Family as usual, except Peggy who has been ill with a fever ever since you left us, which is the reason of my not writing to you sooner. Genl. Sullivan with 2000 Continental Troops are now encamped in the Town of Fishkill; this affair makes the old Gentleman imagine that the Enemy will certainly attempt the River. I could wish he was as easy about the matter as myself—Mr. Platt of Kent informs me that there is a Farm of about 160 Acres with a Comfortable House to be sold near him for about £700, Lawful [money]. Would it not be better to purchase it than have the family in different houses; had I the money of my own, the farm should be mine. The old Gentleman I believe would soon come into the measure if you was to give him only a hint about it. I am Your Afft. Brother Fred Jay.

Fishkill was chosen as the initial place for the family to escape to and they were given room in the house owned by Theodore Van Wyck. In a letter to John he expresses his dismay at being then forced to move to Kent and very worried about the cost of such a move.

Fish Kill, 29 July, 1777. Dear Johnny, I have received your letter of the 21 Inst:—The evacuation of Ticonderoga is very alarming; I wish it may soon be made to appear in a less gloomy light. [157] Hitherto Fady has not been able to succeed in providing waggons to remove your Books to Kent.—My thoughts have been much imployed of late about removing from hence in case of need, but the more I consider of it the more I am perplexd., for my present state of health admits of my undergoing no fatigue. Besides I conceive my going to Kent will be attended with an immense expence, for there I can hire no Farm to raise necessarys for my numerous Family, but must lodge them in different Houses and buy daily food &c for them, I suppose at the same exorbitant rate that is extorted from the distressed in other parts of the Country; so that unless I can get a Farm in order to raise so much as will in some measure answer the expence of the Necessarys of life, I am very apprehensive it will have too great a tendency to our ruin, for we may long continue in our present distressed situation before a Peace takes place. I am indeed at a loss what steps to take and therefore I could wish you were nearer at hand to consult with you and Fady what to do. Hitherto my present abode appears to me as safe as elsewhere, and it may be most prudent to continue here till we know what rout the Regulars take & their success if any they have; but in the mean time it may be best to remove some of my most valuable things by way of precaution, which we’ll consider of when you come here. If we can purchase another Waggon it shall be done. Johnny Strang was here about a fortnight or three weeks ago when we was expectg. the Regulars were about coming up the River; he then proposed to send a box or two he has of yours at his Father’s to Salem, and promised to remove them from there in case of need & said he would be very careful of them. Nancy is now unwell & Peggy is very sick with an intermitting fever ever since her return from Albany. I am yr. affecte. Father Peter Jay.

They all stayed with Theodorus almost two years in his house near Fishkill.

Notes from Van Voorhis Book: _Born 1702_ _Lived in the old stone house down the lane at Swartoutville._ _Col. John Brinckerhoff. A promiment [sic] citizen of the colonies prior to the Revolution. He joined the American Army. A soldier & a patriot. He was the intimate friend of General Washington. His confidential adviser during the dark days of the War for Independence. His home was the head‑quarters of Gen Washington. Who spent a night & day there in secret correspondence with Comt_ Rochambeau the French minister. The time of the anxiety respecting the arrest of Major Andre. As soon as the darkness of the second night shielded them from observation; they departed upon horses. Through the Highlands. in time to arrest the ‑‑British Spy The Brinckerhoff house erected 1738. Was torn down.
Dr. Doros Van Wyck made it his home with his father-in-law, Co., John Brinckerhoff.During the Revolution, it was occupied jointly with the Jay family, including the distinguished partriot, Governor and Chief Justice John Jay. It was from this home that John Jay set off on his mission to France to aid in negotiating the Treaty of Peace with England.

It is hard to recognize now how difficult their life must have been. The revolt against England created extreme contrasts in living in the East. For those supportive of the Revolution, New York City had become dangerous for their lives. Fady had a growing merchant business which had to be left. Rye was in between the patriots and revolutionaries. Gangs of “Cowboys” and “Skinners” prowled the area and stole pillaged and burned whatever they wanted. The stable farm of Peter Jay had become an unsafe area to be in, and the provisions from the farm would end. Meanwhile the Revolution was on. The British had badly defeated the American forces on Brooklyn and had taken control of New York City. They had ships in the river and were on the verge of taking control of the Hudson from New York to Albany. Washington was fighting with a rag time untrained group. His basic strategy soon became to run and try and win fast battles. The dependency on British currency had ended and a new system of Banking was long off. Luckily for the Jays the troops and battles moved South and the military connection between New York and Albany did not happen. Also the large British force moving down Lake Champlain toward Albany died in Saratoga.

Fishkill was reasonably safe, in fact for a period it was the Capitol of New York State. What Fady was doing during this time we have little information. He unlike his brother wrote few letters, which JJ complained about.

Theodorus VanWyck had married the widow of Petrus Du Bois, my GGG Grandfather, Mary Coert Voorhes (Du Bois). I am descended from the youngest child of Petrus and Mary, Cornelius who moved to New York City and became a very successful merchant.

Mary Van Courtland Jay was very ill at the time of the move from Rye and she died in Fishkill in 1777. She was buried in the vault of Gysbert Schneck. In April of 1781 the family were robbed of all their possessions from the Fishkill house. This event was very disconcerting to father Peter and because of it Faddy decided to move the family to Poughkeepsie. It was in Poughkeepsie in 1782 that father Peter Jay died and he was also interred in the vault of Gysbert Schneck. We are still looking for the location of this vault!!

With the death of Peter, “Blind” Peter inherited the Rye house. It must have been soon after this that the family decided they could leave Poughkeepsie and move back to Rye. By 1783 the British had left New York City and it had become the Capitol of the new Union.
At the time of his father’s death in 1782 he inherited the Rye property. He lived in the house with his “retarded” older brother Augustus, his sister Eve Munro and her small child, and his blind sister Anna Maricka. To help him with the care of this family a happy marriage was arranged with Mary Duyckinck in 1789, when he was 55 and she was 53 years old. She was descended from a noted portrait painter and apparently was the original of the “aunt” in the spy story written by George Fenimore Cooper. In fact she was referred to as “Aunt Jay” in Coopers letters.

Eve Jay Munro, after the Revolution left Albany and moved with her son Peter Jay Munro back to Rye and lived with Peter et al. She was difficult for the family and John and Sarah took over the care of her son. He became a successful lawyer in New York.

John and Sarah Jay had moved back to New York City. He had inherited land from his mother’s family in Katonah which became the site of his retirement home into which they moved in 1803 when he had ended his second term as Governor. In 1783 he was Secretary for Foreign Affairs and in 1789 became the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. In 1795 he was elected Governor of the State of New York and moved to the Governors House in NYC and then in his second term moved to Albany.

Fady and his wife Polly Barclay also moved back to New York City. At the time of his fathers death Fady had inherited property in East Bay and they probably lived at 64 Pearl Street.

The house and lot of Peter Jay in “Dock Ward” is now No. 64 Pearl street. This was given by Jacobus Van Cortlandt, in his will, to his daughter Mary, who married Peter Jay. This was a water lot, which was extended by later grants from the city. The part left to Frederick Jay was south of Front street. —

Polly died in 1791 suddenly of a “stroke”. Her unanticipated death was very sudden and a matter of concern to all. Sir James had been sent for but arrived after she had died. In 1794 he married Euphame Dunscomb, the first cousin of his brother Peters wife. Letters from Sarah Jay show that this was not an “approved” marriage! Fady died in 1799 at age 52 and was probably buried in the family vault. His second wife lived until 1817 and was buried in the Jay Cemetery.

Where oh where is Peter Jay

Where oh Where is Peter Jay??

I have been questing the final resting place of Peter and his wife Mary Van Courtland the mother and father of John Jay with little success!

Peter JAY and his wife Mary Van COURTLANDT were buried in the private vault of Gysbert Schneck in Fishkill New York in 1782 (Peter) and 1777 (Mary). This we know from the book, “Memorials of Peter Augustus Jay”. But where oh where are they??

Peter Jay and family had left Rye in 1776, when it became no man’s land during the Revolution and unsafe with Cowboys and Skinners during the Revolution. They first moved to Fishkill and lived in the house of Theodore Van WYCK, MD who had married Mary Coert Voorhes, the widow of my GGGgrandfather Petrus Du Bois at that time.

(Mary and Petrous youngest son was Cornelius who moved to New York City and is my GGGrandfather. His son Henry Augustus married the daughter of Peter Augustus Jay, Catharine Helena Jay, which is how I get into the act!)

Mary VC Jay died in the house in Fishkill in 1777. The house in Fishkill was robbed soon after and the family lost most of their property. This caused Fady to move the family to Poughkeepsie where they stayed until the dangers in Rye were over. John and Sarah Jay were in Spain and Peter Augustus Jay was mostly in New Jersey with his Livingston grandparents, although he was a frequent visitor to Fishkill and Poughkeepsie.

“House of Col John Brinkerhoff/Theodore Van Wyck
Notes from Van Voorhis Book: _Born 1702__Col. John Brinckerhoff. A prominent [sic] citizen of the colonies prior to the Revolution. He joined the American Army. A soldier & a patriot. He was the intimate friend of General Washington. His confidential adviser during the dark days of the War for Independence. His home was the head‑quarters of Gen Washington. Who spent a night & day there in secret correspondence with Comt_ Rochambeau the French minister. The time of the anxiety respecting the arrest of Major Andre. As soon as the darkness of the second night shielded them from observation; they departed upon horses. Through the Highlands. in time to arrest the ‑‑British Spy The Brinckerhoff house erected 1738. Remains unaltered. At Swartoutville._”

“Dr. Doros Van Wyck made it his home with his father-in-law, Co., John Brinckerhoff.During the Revolution, it was occupied jointly with the Jay family, including the distinguished partriot, Governor and Chief Justice John Jay. It was from this home that John Jay set off on his mission to France to aid in negotiating the Treaty of Peace with England.”

I do not know where Fady or Frederick moved the family to in Poughkeepsie. The family at that time was father Peter Jay, the two blind children, Peter and Anna Marika, Augustus, and servants. Fady was married to Margaret “Polly” Barclay. Peter Jay was in declining health and he died in Poughkeepsie in 1782. There is documentation that he also was buried in the Vault of Gysbert Schenck but where is it!!!

With the death of Peter Jay, the Rye house was inherited by “Blind” Peter and the family must have returned to Rye about 1783.

Fady inherited property in the East Bay and probably left Poughkeepsie about the same time. His first wife Polly Barclay died in NYC in 1791. Faddy remarried in 1794, the first cousin of his older brother “Blind” Peter’s wife. This marriage was not popular with the family! Fady died in New York in 1799 and I do not have evidence of where he was buried. Probably the family vault.

This is a lot more information than the story probably needs, but the whereabouts of the Vault of Gysbert Schenck has been a family mystery.

My wife and I decided to take a trip to Fishkill this summer in part to see if we could find where they were buried.

It is just off the Taconic where it meets Interstate 84 and crosses the Hudson on the Hamilton Fish Bridge, (another cousin!,) at Newburgh. Still a quiet town with a strong sense of its history. It for a short while early in the Revolution was the capital of New York State, and as part of its history was a center where Washington, Jay and other of our Revolutionary leaders met. Spies et al. It has been changed by IBM, a prison, and a huge trucking storage center!

Much of my Du Bois ancestry is here. My original to this country ancestor was Peter Du Bois who immigrated to Fishkill from Leyden, Holland, and started the Dutch Reform Church there. He is buried in their cemetery! Also my mothers family go back to Van Wycks who were original settlers of Fishkill.

However no Gysbert Scheneck! Also the old house of Theodore Van Wyck had been torn down. It had badly deteriorated and was on property owned by IBM. We did find in Hopewell Junction which is an adjoining town a Vault, but full of Van Wycks! No Peter Jay.

We made contact with several people who had a big interest in Fishkill and it’s surroundings history which may give us some clues, but there seems to be no record of a vault of Gysbert Schneck. Could he be in Poughkeepsie?

So we are still looking! Another blog may follow!

JJ